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Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: A Plethora of Improvements

October 2nd, 2007 by

With this last article the Sneak Peeks series comes to an end for this release. But don’t worry: it’s tightly packed with an extra share of information on the latest openSUSE 10.3 goodies! Today we’re going through all those things that either didn’t get the chance to have their own article, or are extra convenient small improvements that haven’t been properly covered. As you will know, it is all those extra little things that really contribute to a great user experience on the Linux desktop.

Today we’ll be taking a look at: the new updater applet; redesigned network card module; OpenOffice 2.3; Xfce; the new Kontact; Giver, an easy file sharing tool; KIWI, a system image generator; and much more! We’ll also be getting some closing thoughts from Andreas Jaeger, director of openSUSE, to find out about plans for the future and community contributions.

openSUSE Updater as an Upgrade Tool too

RPM “updates” are specifically defined to refer to RPM patches; for example, as issued in the openSUSE 10.3 Update Repository. RPM package “upgrades” refer to any newer, full RPM package, as you would see in Packman or the openSUSE Build Service.

In openSUSE 10.2, the openSUSE updater acted as just that — simply an updater, providing you with all the official RPM updates. In openSUSE 10.3 however, it provides you with he option of acting like both an updater and an upgrader. All you need to do is enable a simple option. Just right-click on the tray applet and select Configure Applet…

Right-Click on openSUSE Updater

Then enable the option “Show available upgrades when backend provides them” option, and then upgrades will be shown in openSUSE updater, under the Upgrades tab:

opensuse-upgrader.png

Simple!

Guru Repository Merging into Packman

Pascal Bleser (yaloki) has long since been one of the most prominent, helpful, and commited openSUSE community developers, providing the whole community with thousands of extra packages in his Guru repository — undoubtedly the second-most-popular 3rd-party repository.

Packman has typically been the most popular openSUSE community repository, providing many RPMs and multimedia software. Although Pascal has been a packman packager for some time, it is only with openSUSE 10.3 that he has decided to fully merge all of his packages into Packman or the openSUSE Build Service (OBS). His popular Amarok rebuilds have already been moved into Packman for openSUSE 10.3 users. Other OBS repositories such as KDE:Community will have more of his packages integrated into it soon, too.

For openSUSE users that means one repository less to add, and hence makes the openSUSE experience even smoother.

Xfce 4.4.1

openSUSE is all about choice — giving you the option of any desktop environment you require, which of course includes the lightweight Xfce desktop environment.

Users can select to have Xfce installed from the DVD (which contains the packages), or even with the KDE or GNOME CDs, which will grab them from the Internet. If you already have an installed and running system you can easily select to additionally have Xfce installed by using YaST.

Simply head over to YaST -> Software Management; from here, change the Search filter to Patterns (as shown below). Then you just select to install the Xfce Desktop Environment pattern:

select-patterns1.png    yast-list_thumb.png

Obligatory Xfce in openSUSE 10.3 screenshot:

Xfce in openSUSE 10.3

openSUSE Community Translations

Users have been able to directly contribute to the distribution with translations for some time, but it is only in openSUSE 10.3 that community users can lead and be in charge of all translations, including all tier1 languages (Spanish, German, French, etc). So far all the localization teams have done a great job, as is reflected in the openSUSE Localization Portal in the Statistics area.

If you think that you could help with translating openSUSE into your language, please do take a look at the Localization Guide.

Redesigned Network Card Module

Among other things, the openSUSE User eXperience team has been working on improving usability in the YaST network card module. After conducting a large network card survey the new module was launched into factory with a different organisation, making it easier to accomplish all tasks. The new one is simpler, clearer, and better reflects the more common situations and usage of the network card module:

OpenOffice.org 2.3

OpenOffice.org developers, which includes many SUSE developers, have been working hard over the past few months to get the new 2.3 release out. With every release it consistently proves to be the most comprehensive office suite available, with countless fixes and features.

ooo.png

As always, openSUSE 10.2, 10.1 and 10.0 OpenOffice.org 2.3 packages are available in the OpenOffice.org:/STABLE build service repository.

Community Repositories

Another YaST module recently added is the wonderful Community Repositories module which provides you with a nice list of the main official openSUSE repositories, popular repositories from the openSUSE Build Service, and other repositories added by the community from other locations. This makes it trivial to add extra repositories, or to restore your repository list if you ruined your current one.

Note that it should be used with care, however; you should only add an extra repository when you need it and when you know what it will provide. Adding many repositories will slow down your package manager’s start-up time and adding repositories that you don’t know about can ruin your system!

KDEPIM Enterprise Branch

openSUSE 10.3 will also contain the KDE Personal Information Manager (Kontact) from the new Enterprise branch. This version contains a whole bunch of fixes and a few handy new features such as the Favourite Folders container:

Kontact - Personal Information Manager

This new feature makes life a lot easier for those who have many folders around the place and want to always be able to quickly access their favourite ones.

Giver – Easy Local File Sharing

Another tremendously helpful application that came as the result of Hack Week was a nice new application called Giver. This little application docks into your system tray, and when you open it up you can see a list of all the users on your network who have Giver open:

Giver - Easy File Sharing

To transfer images, files or even folders, all you have to do is drag it onto the person you want to send it to. They will get a small dialog asking them to accept or decline receiving the file:

Giver - Notification

..and then if they accept, it’ll pop up right onto their desktop. Simple!

Giver requires absolutely no extra configuration to get it up-and-running. All you have to do is start the application on the computers that you want to be able to send stuff to, and it will do all the rest. Another nice touch is that you also have the option of adding pictures to your user entry, as is displayed above.

KIWI — Roll Your own System Images

One of the most significant ongoing projects in openSUSE is KIWI — a tool for building all kinds of system images. The eventual plan is to integrate KIWI with the openSUSE Build Service, but it offers a huge range of capabilities even right now.

Unlike other system image tools, KIWI is completely configurable and has a very clean design. You can specify exactly the packages that you want, and you can build a full range of images including Live CDs, Installer Images, virtualisation systems like QEMU/VMware and Xen images, network (pxe) images and more. It is even now used as the base for LTSP in openSUSE.

KIWI now even has a nice graphical front-end in the form of the Image Creator YaST module, which means you can create images without using the shell at all.

YaST2 KIWI KIWI - Pattern Selection

This makes it much easier to select exactly the packages you want, add in extra patterns, or change any configurations.

All the Latest Free and Open Source Software

As usual, openSUSE 10.3 will of course come with all the usual latest free and open source software. Take a look at the Product_Highlights/10.3 page on the wiki to get a quick run-down.

openSUSE 10.3 is coming!

openSUSE 10.3 will be released this Thursday, the 4th of October, so stay tuned for the official announcement, which will be right here at news.openSUSE.org!

 

Talk with Andreas Jaeger

I caught up with former project manager and current director at openSUSE, Andreas, to find out about openSUSE and the future.

What kind of things does your position as director involve?

On the one hand the usual management stuff like tutoring people, planning products and budgets. Currently my highest priority is trying to help the team to get openSUSE 10.3 released. This includes testing of the distribution – I’m writing this from an openSUSE 10.3 RC2 system – including doing some extra tests like for the bootloader, advising on what next steps to do, discussing technical problems, getting extra help to test and fix the last pieces, advising on the schedule and reviewing marketing material for 10.3.

In general I’ll try to look at the project overall and work with internal and external stake holders on how to make the openSUSE project successful. One step is our opening of a position for an openSUSE chief evangelist.

I’ve been also involved with forming the first openSUSE board and once 10.3 is out, we will move forward with it and enact the Guiding Principles as well.

Could you tell us a little bit about the team’s plans for openSUSE in the future?

The project has three main areas, so let me say something for each of them:

Distribution:
One major step is cleaning up the distribution so that we can build it completely in the build service. Our next version will be called openSUSE 11.0.

We will soon start discussing ideas on what to do. We’re just working on a YaST survey to get feedback on what users think about our systems management – and what we shall do for the future. A few features have been postponed from 10.3, others have been found while testing the betas. It will contain the latest stable software as usual including GNOME 2.22 and KDE 4.0.

We also have to do some changes under the hood, e.g. the switch to GCC 4.3 will need quite some changes in packages that many users will not notice at all.

Communication:
I really like what has been done with the web pages redesign, the team has done a great job. Now it’s time to fill those pages with valuable content. We have also many localized wikis but would welcome some more – and could use help for some of the existing ones.

Build Service:
The greatest challenge is empowering external community members so that they can as easily contribute to the distribution as currently internal community members do. This involves changes to the openSUSE Build Service and also changes to the tools used. I’ll give some details in the next section.

We also want to make it easier for others to setup their own build service – this includes good documentation and official releases.

Particularly for openSUSE 10.3, there have been some great new development contributions from the community like the Package Search, 1-Click-Install, LTSP, webpin, and Compiz Fusion packages. What things in the future will make it even easier for the community to get involved?

For development, we concentrate on the openSUSE build service. Currently we have an internal build system and the external buildservice but this is a one way system since Adrian has to sync the packages out to the external build service (and automatically to the factory distribution). My highest priority is to make it easier that community members can maintain packages so that they will end without many manual steps in the factory distribution. Adrian and Klaas have written about the source handling on the build service mailing list.

We are also working on enhancing KIWI so that everybody can create custom images – both Live images as well as installation images. This will allow users to do their own distributions or add-on products like the Education AddOn CD that is worked on for 10.3.

Thanks!

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63 Responses to “Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: A Plethora of Improvements”

  1. Darkelve

    Thank you OpenSUSE team! I think I am going to greatly enjoy 10.3 and maybe have some fun building my own ‘spin’ for/on OpenSUSE 10.3 =)

    • Morten Rene

      I’m looking forward to installing opensuse 10.3. Thanks to the opensuse team.

  2. Olivier

    On applications like Giver, it’s a bit pointless if it doesn’t work with anything on windows or MacOS or does it ?

    • Andreas

      On applications like Giver, it’s a bit pointless if it doesn’t work with anything on windows or MacOS or does it ?

      You can get the giver source code and port it. It’s there and open.

      For protocols like Windows File Sharing, it’s a bit pointless if they don’t open the specs or code. (also, NTFS, Active Directory, .doc)

  3. Guðmundur Bjarni Jónsson

    I just want to thank everyone involved with opensuse for this fantastic operating system. Keep up the good work :)

  4. BartOtten

    This is the revanche for 10.1……10.3 rocks!

  5. Darkelve

    “On applications like Giver, it’s a bit pointless if it doesn’t work with anything on windows or MacOS or does it ?”

    I also had that thought, I think it would be great if giver could be made to work ‘seamlessly’ (as they like to call it) on other platforms too.

    It all depends on your setup I guess.

    • Francis Giannaros

      Obviously it’s not pointless because believe it or not some houses have more than one Linux setup. Though it would be nice if it worked on Windows, too, yes.

  6. openSUSE continues to make me wonder why in the world it’s not the most popular distro… I guess we need to get the word out :)

    Outstanding job guys… everything looks great. Giver looks really cool :)

  7. ra100

    I´d like to ask about subpixelhinting.
    Will it work in openSUSE 10.3 also?
    Thanks.

  8. We are those features of the updater unavailable in gnome? when i click preference this option doesn’t shows up :(

    • Francis Giannaros

      The option’s still there, just labeled differently: “List 3rd party updates” or something similar, which should be the required behaviour.

  9. Erunno

    Well, like most people here I’m eagerly looking forward to 10.3 but where there is light there are also shadows:

    The GNOME updater applet doesn’t show you which package upgrades will be installed, opening the details only shows the updates. I haven’t found out yet how to check which packages have been installed in the GUI.

    The second giver screenshot shows a GTK+ notifier / popup bubble. I thought that we got rid of GTK+ applets when the zen updater got the boot but it looks like nobody could be arsed to write a proper Qt / KDE frontend. Are we going the Ubuntu way by treating KDE like a second class citizen?

    The community repository of repositories is really strange. Why was only Games (action) included? What about Games (adventures) for popular applications like ScummVM for instance? A 10.3 OpenOffice repository doesn’t exist at all but it’s still an option. And the lack of a KDE4 repository is really surprising.

    Apart from that there are still some bugs which still persist on my RC2 system. Out of curiosity I gave the GNOME flavour a try and there are still some real showstoppers: Both Totem and Banshee don’t work due to some problems with the gstreamer backend. The updater applet freezes after applying the updates. During the initialisation of the software management the flashing progress bars tend to steal the focus from the current application.

    If problems like this will persist until Thursday expect some bad press from both reviewers and curious first-time users. Maybe a delay for one week would be in order (together with RC3) to iron out some of these bugs.

    • Francis Giannaros

      > The GNOME updater applet doesn’t show you which package upgrades will be installed, opening the details only shows the updates. I haven’t found out yet how to check which packages have been installed in the GUI.

      False. The option is just labeled differently (see above).

      > The second giver screenshot shows a GTK+ notifier / popup bubble. I thought that we got rid of GTK+ applets when the zen updater got the boot but it looks like nobody could be arsed to write a proper Qt / KDE frontend.

      Giver was the result of a _hack week_ project by a GNOME developer. It’s not enabled by default in the distribution, but on the online repository, and I though tit was a nice addition so I mentioned it. I’m sorry that you expect the developer to have implemented a Qt+ front-end in their hack week, but the whole point of the week was to do something that _they_ want to. That said, writing a Qt+ app with the same functionality should be reasonably trivial.

      > Are we going the Ubuntu way by treating KDE like a second class citizen?

      I wish people would stop trying to always jump the gun as soon as they think a feature is lacking from the X desktop environment. openSUSE is not Ubuntu, or any other distribution for that matter. openSUSE brings a _great_ GNOME delivery now, but that doesn’t mean its KDE is lacking — openSUSE has more KDE developers at it than any other distribution, and they’re constantly driving innovative KDE technologies (see the KDE 4 article).

      > Why was only Games (action) included? What about Games (adventures) for popular applications like ScummVM for instance?

      The community list was made by community suggestions. If people in the openSUSE community didn’t suggest it, no-one making the list knew about it and hence it wasn’t added. This list is grabbed from an online location and hence is independent of the distribution as it can be changed any time. If you would like to see some repos, please tell us about it in bugzilla! :-)

      > Apart from that there are still some bugs which still persist on my RC2 system. Out of curiosity I gave the GNOME flavour a try and there are still some real showstoppers: Both Totem and Banshee don’t work due to some problems with the gstreamer backend. The updater applet freezes after applying the updates. During the initialisation of the software management the flashing progress bars tend to steal the focus from the current application.

      I tried GNOME and didn’t see _any_ of those issues in GM, so you can hope for the best :-)

      > If problems like this will persist until Thursday expect some bad press from both reviewers and curious first-time users. Maybe a delay for one week would be in order (together with RC3) to iron out some of these bugs.

      10.3 has been declared gold now and it will be released this Thursday! :)

      • Erunno

        >False. The option is just labeled differently (see above).

        Pardon me, but what? The GNOME applet doesn’t show package upgrades (meaning NON-updates) neither in the default nor in the details view. And in case there’s actually an option to see which package upgrades will be installed it is so well hidden that it warrants a GUI redesign.

        >Giver was the result of a _hack week_ project by a GNOME developer. It’s not enabled by default in the distribution, but on the online repository, and I though tit was a nice addition so I mentioned it. I’m sorry that you expect the developer to have implemented a Qt+ front-end in their hack week, but the whole point of the week was to do something that _they_ want to. That said, writing a Qt+ app with the same functionality should be reasonably trivial.

        The explanation sounds acceptable but it wouldn’t look so much out of place if they’d at least chosen to make screenshots in GNOME.

        >The community list was made by community suggestions. If people in the openSUSE community didn’t suggest it, no-one making the list knew about it and hence it wasn’t added. This list is grabbed from an online location and hence is independent of the distribution as it can be changed any time. If you would like to see some repos, please tell us about it in bugzilla! :-)

        You mean nobody checked whether the repositories exist (OpenOffice for 10.3)? And even if noone suggested it KDE4 was pretty much a no-brainer.

        >I tried GNOME and didn’t see _any_ of those issues in GM, so you can hope for the best :-)

        I checked the bug database and for each problem with my installation I mentioned there’s already a bug filed so I’m not the only one who encountered them. I’m having trouble believing that you don’t have the focus stealing bug / design flaw at least.

        >10.3 has been declared gold now and it will be released this Thursday! :)

        *shrug* Too bad, if openSUSE wants to compete with Ubuntu it will have to try harder.

        • Francis Giannaros

          > Pardon me, but what? The GNOME applet doesn’t show package upgrades (meaning NON-updates) neither in the default nor in the details view.

          You can’t see _which ones_ in the updater applet itself, but you can in YaST after you hit “Details” (if you select the right option). This was a design decision, quite evidently.

          > The explanation sounds acceptable but it wouldn’t look so much out of place if they’d at least chosen to make screenshots in GNOME.

          I was in KDE at the time, I’m sorry that you took such great offense to me taking the screenshot in KDE instead of GNOME, but the application works in either desktop environment.

          > You mean nobody checked whether the repositories exist (OpenOffice for 10.3)? And even if noone suggested it KDE4 was pretty much a no-brainer.

          Why would you want to add the OOo repository list now? openSUSE 10.3 has the latest version, and hence listing it would be pretty pointless. For KDE4, I still don’t know why you’re so upset about this since the list can be changed _at any time_.

        • Erunno

          >You can’t see _which ones_ in the updater applet itself, but you can in YaST after you hit “Details” (if you select the right option). This was a design decision, quite evidently.

          Nope, it doesn’t although I agree that this is (for me) the expected behaviour. “Details” show you which updates (!) will be installed, not upgrades. There have been several package upgrades in the last couple of days and none was shown in “Details”. If this is NOT the intended behaviour I guess that I stumbled upon another bug.

          >Why would you want to add the OOo repository list now? openSUSE 10.3 has the latest version, and hence listing it would be pretty pointless. For KDE4, I still don’t know why you’re so upset about this since the list can be changed _at any time_.

          About OOo: That’s not the point. The item is in the list and the repository doesn’t exist (yet) and therefore gives an error when trying to add it. About KDE4: I’m not angry, I find it only odd especially when considering that openSUSE is usually on the forefront of making recent KDE4 snapshots available in a convenient way.

        • Jukka

          The Gnome updater applet would be much more usable, if it displayed the updates. Besides this, it would be nice to have the same functionality like the KDE-Applet. As i figured out, you can not include upgrades in the GNOME version, while you can in the KDE version.

          Also for me, the Gnome updater-applet freezes after performing upgrades.

          Besides this, for me, 10.3 is the best Linux distro I have ever experienced. GREAT WORK!

          Thank you.

        • Jukka

          I have to add that the Gnome updater applet does not only freeze. I discovered that it does not apply any updates at all.

  10. glimpze777

    yipeee..bye bye ubuntu!

  11. R. J.

    I’ve been using 10.3 since the beta’s and love it, haven’t had any problems yet. But I do hate, and I mean HATE Kmail, can the large KDE team that works on opensuse please do something with it, please. Give us a e-mail client that sets the linux distro’s apart. Honestly, look at the new apple mail program, look at the new windows live mail, and even thunderbird. Kmail is a dinosaur, we can’t do html emails, can not insert photo’s. E-mail, especially for business is vital, and still we have a pre-historic email client in kamil, and the development team that works on it wanting to not ad such things and keeping it pure and free from html, when that is exactly the direction email clients are going, because that is the direction the public want. So please, give us a real e-mail client. I’m sorry what has been put out is crap. A favorites folder is so stupid, now we can have a folder in a silly little box just above the folders, what a waste of screen space. How about Opensuse create a kmail poll on what people want in their email client. I love 10.3, but i feel on KDE, kmail is a real crapper. It’s kind of like KDE4, the major let down so far is the kopete team don’t plan on a new release for kde4, just porting the current one to it, bla.

    Please, give us a better email client, please.

    • Grósz Dániel

      KMail handles HTML mails.

    • Henry S..

      I’m just guessing, but I think the problem with HTML in Kmail is because there isn’t
      a WYSIWYG editor for KDE. I don’t know whatever happened to the plans for WYSIWYG
      in Quanta…but if there was a kpart HTML editor, it could be dropped right in. I
      just don’t think that it ever worked well with KHTML. I believe that I read that
      WebKit makes WYSIWYG possible. So if KDE switches to WebKit, it may get a WYSIWG
      editor.

      Note, most of the above is compiled memories from the last 5 years…so it may
      be horribly inaccurate.

      • Grósz Dániel

        I am the only one who has a Formatting (HTML) item in the Options menu in KMail composer and a VPL Editor in the View menu in Quanta +? (The latter is, indeed, buggy.)

  12. shmook

    I use Kmail everyday (in Kontact), and I agree that there are some issues… above all the UI freezing, which is the most hated bug in KDE for years now: http://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=41514 . Several other bugs on the “most hated” list are also kmail-related. So it would really be nice to have an alternative to Kmail, which integrates into Kontact.

  13. Sunil

    This is too cool!! I was introduced to OpenSUSE by my friend and was the first linux distro. I was hooked from then, I’m still hooked. Nice job Novell team :)

  14. ry.lytt@gmail.com

    It would be great to integrate optional md5 generation/checking for folders, ie: right-click/create_md5 to make an .md5 text file in the folder, then later, right-click/check_md5 to verify the folder’s integrity against this file (perhaps after virus scare, corrupt disk etc.) If other distro’s copied it, it would be universal, and a small exe could be made for win too, and they could all work together, so you could always check your data for integrity. The .md5 file could be burned to cds etc within it’s directory, and the disk checked by just inserting it into a pc running any distro.

    Just an idea for next release!

  15. Arijit, from India

    Thank you Opensuse team,

    Opensuse v10.3 is really awesome. Everybody praising it. I don’t want to repeat the same words. I will say only one thing to show you guys how much happy I am,
    “Opensuse made me to reject Ubuntu and jump into the opensuse ship. Opensuse is simply the best Linux distribution right now, at least for me”.

    A big thank you and congratulations from bottom of my heart.
    All I can give back to you that I’ll promote opensuse as much as I can.

  16. I have been a die hard fan of opensuse from version 9. After using opensuse/suse I just cant adjust with any other distro or operating system. Opensuse seriously rocks and I cant understand why it is not at the top list (I don’t like ubuntu and cant understand why it is on the top list). The best of opensuse/suse releases where 9.1, 9.2 and 10.2 (other release had some glitches still good releases) but now i hope 10.3 would be the best of all. I could see some serious works done by the opesuse team under the hood and also many usability improvements. Waiting for the release. Congrats to all the opensuse team for their fabulous work.

  17. Andrzej

    I’m really looking forward to this release if you compare the progress that has been made form 9-10-10.1-10.2. and now 10.3 im really looking forward this release… I hope that all the bugs were iron out from the RC candidate had some problems with wireless… Though I am wondering if the default theme from SUSE 10.2 was changed… The blue is really getting to be very boring and ugly… I love the variety of wallpapers included but it would be nice to give users some new themes and icons, if not in this release, then maybe in the next one.
    Cheers!!
    Thanks

  18. Tom

    Just installed 10.3 on my medion laptop, works nice! one cd kde installation. everything works nice, only thing not working is my wireless out of the box. The ipw2200 was autodetected so this was nice, but I had to use a cable connection to download the acerhk module which is needed for networking to work(to turn of the radio kill switch or something). with that module loaded, it’s all very easy to setup my wpa2 encrypted wireless network. It really rocks guys! and compiz also works very good here. congratulations!

  19. Guys 10.3 looks awasome but I hope that the Atheros drivers are better in the final release than the RC1 release.
    Had no end of dramas getting my NetGear WG311T V3 card woring in 10.3 which was a breeze in 10.2.

    I had to force the kernel modules to be installed then everything worked no issues until i did a kernel update and then wirelss networking broke. The Atheros drivers available were for a kernel more recent than that which was released with RC1 so I hope that the final release vesin does not suffer from this issue.

    Other than that, this release seems to be really solid and a credit to the OpenSuSE team who have worked their butts off to get this one out the door. Looking forward to downloading on Saturday (Oz time)after the inital rush has subsided :-) Congrats to all!!!

  20. singh

    Guys, when is it going to be available on the public servers? I have waited far too long for it and can’t wait any more to lay my hands on it.

  21. Joshua

    10-4-2007 :)

    Now just waiting for it to be available i guess :)

  22. bob

    hi, i’m new here.

  23. Stir Zoltan

    Can’t wait to install the new release! And one other thing. I seen that everyone is comparing openSUSE to Ubuntu. How long will it take for you guys to realise that openSUSE is NOT Ubuntu?!

  24. Velocity

    Erunno –
    You are a complete moron. Go fiddle with your ubuntu oh and the crappy design of the let’s say “GnuSolaris” otherwise known as the failed Nexenta.
    Opensuse is to good for you man.
    And as far as competing with opensuse or SuSe for that matter? do not make me piss my pants laughing. Suse was here long long before Ubuntu and will be here long after. With that said as well it is now as far as *nix is concerened the best damn os out there. If you have a problem with that, take the other 50+ crappy *nix new distros and combine them into one and still not have anything close to something as decent as OpenSuse. Seriously, newbie stop talking crap.
    I have used FreeBsd and other BSD DISTRO’S SINCE 94.Not to mention linus using 30%+ of BSD’S code to make his linux kernel. Which is fine. He did a great job. The first well known linux was a fight between slack, Red Hat, and then mandrake came along and stormix and a few others. But when SuSe hit , form the start it rocked. It came from the dust up to a bad ass os working it’s way to the top. Are you going to tell me that some Ubuntu linux is ever going to be simply better then Opensuse and for that matter any of the other os’s that had blood sweat and tears? Hell No! Ubuntu is a copy cat from a mixture of distros. that is all

    • Eddie Wilson

      Its people like you who give OpenSuse a bad name. If you want to promote the distro then do it by telling of the merits of this distro, which are many, and not by using childlike stupid comments. Its time for you to grow up a little.

  25. Velocity

    Erunno
    Seriously, newbie stop talking crap.
    I have used FreeBsd and other BSD DISTRO’S SINCE 94.Not to mention linus using 30%+ of BSD’S code to make his linux kernel. Which is fine. He did a great job. The first well known linux was a fight between slack, Red Hat, and then mandrake came along and stormix and a few others. But when SuSe hit , form the start it rocked. It came from the dust up to a bad ass os working it’s way to the top. Are you going to tell me that some Ubuntu linux is ever going to be simply better then Opensuse and for that matter any of the other os’s that had blood sweat and tears? Hell No! Ubuntu is a copy cat from a mixture of distros. that is all

  26. thewitch

    I tried the last RC and I was specifically looking for the ability to be able to use Virtualbox with the connection to the USB ports.

    It was rumoured to be there… but it wasn’t – at the time.

    Is the release version of 10.3 going to have the ‘USB proxy’ service enabled so that those of us who rely on VM’s having proper access to our hardware will be able to use them correctly.

    This is a big stumbling block – because I have to use a VM for some graphics/media programs that just will not run under wine or crossoveroffice – so I have to use Mint 3.0/3.1 for this purpose. I would far rather use OpenSUSE because the Yast system is streets ahead of any of the other configuration systems I ever made use of.

    So… USB proxy there and enabled? Or do I have to consign 10.3 to just being a file server?

    PS – I’m a user, not a developer or a programmer… so don’t tell me all I have to do is to recompile the kernel – that needs skills I haven’t got and it would probably need a nice interface somewhere within Yast to make it a workable idea!

    • Niv KA

      USB in VirtualBox is only in the non opensource version… the version included with 10.3 is the OSS version, so you don’t have it… someone correct me if I’m wrong.

      • thewitch

        I quite agree with you on that point – but you’ve missed the point I was making.

        Real users don’t fall into the trap of only using the OSS versions of software – the facility is there in the non-OSS version and when you have to be able to access the USB ports, you need that facility. It’s not a case of ‘tough luck’ – the USB proxy facility that makes the USB ports available is supposed to be in the kernel… so why on earth is it not enabled? That service isn’t non-OSS – it’s kernel level – and should be on!

        It’s not just VirtualBox that needs it – VMware Server can also access the USB ports and it works fine on other distributions where they have enabled the service.

        I run both VirtualBox and VMware Server – and I can’t do it on OpenSUSE, which I would far rather do. It’s a very polished distro and works like a dream for most things – I recommend it to my friends, colleagues and clients… but if they’re ever going to need state of the art drivers for things like printing and need to run a VM to run the windows apps that won’t run under wine etc… – that the point where I advise them to use another distro because OpenSUSE would be a waste of time.

        My score for OpenSUSE now stands at 9/10 for basic office use and file serving… – and 1/10 for the things I need for the real world – as in running my business. That duty falls on a distro where I can make full use of the facilities I need because in my business I need the best drivers to be able to produce accurate proofs for clients – and at the moment, the only way I can do that is to use industry standard apps with the printer manufacturers drivers and run them in the VM.

        Sorry guys – you could have made a system that worked properly – I’ll stay with 10.2 as it’s already installed – and wait and see if you can get it right in the next release!

  27. benefici

    I was soooo excited…. and now I’m so disappointed.
    The 10.3 release is just not ready yet.
    Installation: time zone setup is buggy (cannot set time, TZ offset is wrong), reboot during installation does not umount HD -> some changes are not flushed from cache (reiserfs playing back transactions on restart).
    Design is, well, not nice. Mouse cursor too small, Yast icons ugly, green colors to strong. I know, tastes are different
    NVidia driver one-click installation, supposedly “the easy way”, simply fails (solution to me was to update the kernel first and reboot, also, I had to start sax2 manually with -m 0=nvidia)
    Compiz fusion one-click installation fails -> repository seems to be missing or not setup correctly
    Yast sw setup starts faster, but search seems to be a lot slower than before

    On the plus side, the newer version of Kopete can handle my webcam. I’ll try running it under 10.2 and wait with the 10.3 upgrade.

  28. Anonymous

    awesome work guys, but where is it?

  29. Dich

    Generally – gorgeous distro (being with Suse since 5.2).

    But may I ask why was this “upgrade” feature added to an “updater applet” instead of plugging it in Yast?
    Right now this bloody applet tells me there are 408 packages to be upgraded, and if I select ALL it freezes, and if I select only bunches it complains about unresolved dependencies. In Yast one can fix these dependency problems, and here you have to start from scratch, even if 99% of the packages you selected didn’t have ANY problems. Also, being asked for the root password everytime is kind of annoying, perhaps makes sense to have the “trusted” user list (yep, ubuntu way) who are allowed to update?

    And it’s Oct 4 already, I can see the iso images in the repositories, yet none is enabled. You’re just teasing us! :)

  30. Anonymous

    huh huh, oh. th.. there you are. Just had to put my spectacles on, you gave me such a fright. There I was just pottering around, god knows how long you may have been there watching me. I must ask, what are your intentions? why did you not say anything to indicate your presence here? Well I’ve got work to do here, would you kindly leave, and next time, well….

  31. Velocity

    Comment by Anonymous
    2007-10-04 12:08:55
    huh huh, oh. th.. there you are. Just had to put my spectacles on, you gave me such a fright. There I was just pottering around, god knows how long you may have been there watching me. I must ask, what are your intentions? why did you not say anything to indicate your presence here? Well I’ve got work to do here, would you kindly leave, and next time, well….
    ———————————————

    Can i have some of your percocet. I am watching everyone. It is my Job!

  32. Chris

    I hope this version has the rt2500 drivers fixed. I have skipped the 10.X series so far because of the non support of this chipset (for wireless cards including linksys).

  33. eingmt

    thank you, openSuSE team, i tried nearly all other distributions and none of them work on my hardware, you did a great job since 7.2

  34. tom

    Is it possible to upgrade from suse 10.0 to opensuse 10.3 seamlessly?

  35. kiran

    Seems like a wonderful distro put together. Solid like it always has been and a pleasure to use. I really don’t understand why some people get into the ubuntu vs opensuse thing. Its such a pointless debate. Anyway congratulations to the Opensuse team for such a cool job!

  36. Edwin

    I’m downloading 10.3 now and am convinced that it will be great, like all others previous releases. I’m with SuSE ever since release 6.1…

    I have been using 10.2 on my Toshiba Satellite Pro laptop, and there are some issues with the graphics driver. Even the driver provided by AMD has issues, like getting a scrambled screen when switching over to console (and back wouldn’t go as well).

    Furthermore, my Toshiba has a SD card reader which can’t be accessed, and the sound controls (obviously designed for Windoze) can’t be used as well.

    Is there going to be any real laptop support?

  37. Tyron

    Hi guys,

    I am really new to Linux, I have used K/Ubuntu and openSUSE-10.2 I found SUSE a really easy door in to the Linux world, it right from the easy install and usability of the system. I am only using Windows at the moment as my one problem was I wireless card was not supported at all. I can’t wait until 10.3 finishes downloading I’m sure it will work now and I can do MOST of PC stuff using SUSE instead of windows. It always seemed to run faster and consume way less battery power. Which is what we all want, Right? SO… KUDOS to the SUSE team!!!

    Also I don’t believe we should be here complaining about things in this or any other distro! ITS FREE and open source. So if you don’t like something fix it yourself!! Or if you have no idea how to (like me) then maybe you should just be thankful that the SUSE team actually give a crap about what you think and they take their surveys into consideration when creating a new release!! They put their own time in to these projects (mostly) and don’t really have to listen to a thing you whinge about. But they do…

    Once again… KUDOS and thank you.

    Tyron

  38. Aguasanta

    Are SuSe people working on a live-cd or live-dvd installable? When they go to work on it?

  39. scott

    Powersave still has major issues with standard CPU support for managing processor CPU and preventing overheat

    In 10.2 Powersave could not manage an Intel P4 HT 3.2 and now it cannot manage an AMD Athlon(tm) 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 4800+ in 10.3

    Powersave and particularly CPU Frequency Management needs attention

    Log Notification follows:

    05/12/07 08:36:23 multivac-1 powersaved[6323] WARNING (CpufreqManagement:51) No capability cpufreq_control

    05/12/07 08:36:23 multivac-1 powersaved[6323] WARNING (CpufreqManagement:51) No capability cpufreq_control

  40. scott

    Opensuse updater can NOT resolve dependencies on a default installation of the X86_64 software. I can understand issues of resolving dependencies on complex changes away from default, however failing to resolve default installation dependencies is very poor.

    2 Problems: Problem: No valid solution found with just resolvables of best architecture. Problem: atom:samba cannot be installed due to missing dependencies Problem: No valid solution found with just resolvables of best architecture. With this run only resolvables with the best architecture have been regarded. Regarding all possible resolvables takes time, but can come to a valid result. Solution 1: Make a solver run with ALL possibilities. Regarding all resolvables with a compatible architecture.