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Novell Open Audio: openSUSE 10.3

October 5th, 2007 by

As part of a Novell Open Audio series on openSUSE, they will be interviewing various openSUSE developers to find out more about the project, particular involvements and new technologies in the distribution. Today’s interview features a talk with Martin Lasarsch, an openSUSE evangelist. He extensively goes over the changes in openSUSE 10.3, highlighting all the nice improvements along the way.

The episode also features a talk with no fewer than 10 of the core openSUSE developers, as they provide insight into the openSUSE releases and how things like the numbering of our releases work.

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4 Responses to “Novell Open Audio: openSUSE 10.3”

  1. Oleg

    It was a fun interview. Excellent job managing 15 people!

    I do think though that it would be nice to have code names for openSUSE releases. Take, for example, a new release of GroupWise – Bonsai. I’m not sure if it’s going to be GroupWise 7.5 or 8.0, but GroupWise Bonsai release sounds better, plus I can easy associate new features with this particular version. I know that interface is improved, I know that it would have notification feature plus more, plus more….

    The same could work for the openSUSE. We should have a road map with some code names. Maybe community could provide some input. I think it should be something positive, fun and reassuring.

    Frequently, openSUSE uses green color in its distribution so let’s come up with slogans for a new release. Something like: It’s greener on the other side! Come visit and see it for yourself.

  2. chika

    i agree there must be a slogan for each release, just like ubuntu.
    it is easy to remember than 10.3….
    let’s say GG “GREAT GREEN”

    wonder when will i get the dvd + repository of 10.3 on kambing.ui.edu?

  3. KENNETH RICHARDS

    The AMD 64 DVD iso does not seem useable according to K3b .

  4. eingmt

    i think sticking to vrsion numbers is still good. cuz i don’t like the system of giving each new version a new name. if it’s for major kernel changes, ok, then the codename thing would be a good idea. but releasing newly named(!) systems 5 times a year sucks…