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Archive for February, 2012

Rest in peace, daemon.

February 29th, 2012 by

Our fellow and long time openSUSE contributor Marco “daemon” Michna has passed away last week.

He was a friend to many of us, and will be sorely missed.

Our condolences and sympathy go out to his family and friends.

Daemon, dear friend, rest in peace.

openSUSE & GSOC 2012

February 29th, 2012 by

GSOC 12 logo with openSUSE Geeko
openSUSE as a project always looking to improve and grow and this is one of those opportunities: Google Summer of Code!

Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is a program that offers students an paid opportunity to write code for several open source projects. The purpose is to benefit open source projects and encourage young developers to hack and learn. Both have a lot to gain in the end, experience and code. Google funds these students as well as the project.
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Continue the openSUSE Weekly News

February 24th, 2012 by

After three years of hard work the chairman of the openSUSE Weekly News team, Sascha Manns has given up his chair. We have recieved many questions about the future of the Weekly News so we thought to write a little bit about this topic.
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12.1 update repository changes

February 20th, 2012 by

Teams from the openSUSE Buildservice and openSUSE Maintenance worked together since weeks now to integrate openSUSE distribution maintenance support into the Buildservice on build.opensuse.org.

There were a lot of changes and a lot of places had to be adapted, but finally they got it working: maintenance updates for openSUSE 12.1 are now handled inside the openSUSE Buildservice without further need of SUSE internal scripts (well: we still will have some of them running as backup for a while now).

As a lot of people were involved in this task and a lot of code has been written, some smaller bugs might still be included, even if everyone tries to avoid failures. One of the most visible bugs was the unsigned 12.1 update repository from 2012-02-18 until 2012-02-19: the reason was a sync script that tried to pull the repository from a wrong location where the signing was not yet done with the new setup.  We apologize for the trouble and irritation caused and really appreciate all the reports from our users about that broken repository – as this shows the high amount of interest and knowledge about the security impact such an unsigned repository has.

Development of openSUSE 12.2 started!

February 17th, 2012 by

With the release of Milestone 1, the development of openSUSE 12.2 has started! We’re pleased to announce that Milestone 1 contains many minor updates, like a new Firefox version but also major things like new artwork and KDE 4.8.

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openSUSE at FOSDEM

February 8th, 2012 by
busy booth

Busy time at the booth

openSUSE brought lots of fun to FOSDEM in Brussels, Belgium. We’re all exhausted now from selling beer, t-shirts, hats and giving demonstrations of openSUSE with GNOME Shell, KDE, Plasma Active, openSUSE-on-ARM (running XFCE) and countless other things. Yet we did want to tell you about FOSDEM before we go catch up on sleep! (more…)

GNOME Accessibility Hackfest (interview)

February 7th, 2012 by

A few weeks ago in A Coruña, Spain a Hackfest around GNOME Accessibility took place hosted by Igalia . openSUSE found the opportunity to make some questions to the people involved and then learn a bit more about this interesting Project. Our interviewers were Alejandro Piñeiro Iglesias, Joanmarie Diggs and Juanjo Marín.

 

1 – What is ATK and AT-SPI in simple words?

AT-SPI is the acronym for Assistive Technology Service Provider Interface. Its main purpose is to provide a means for an assistive technology to interact with an application. For instance, the Orca screen reader wants to present newly-inserted text, such as a new instant message, to the user. Therefore Orca asks AT-SPI to inform it whenever text gets inserted. When Orca is told what text has just been inserted, it can present that new text to the user in speech and in braille. Similarly, Orca presents each newly-focused object to the user as the user navigates via the keyboard. Orca can do this because AT-SPI tells it each time a new object gains focus.

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