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Open-Bugs-Day on Sunday the 20th of February

February 16th, 2011 by

As you all know, we’re closing in on the Final Release of openSUSE 11.4…

and so in this last window for bug-fixing we need your help! The testing team is looking for volunteers to help with bugs in bugzilla on the Open-Bugs-Day at Sunday the 20th of February. Participants are going through the bugs that currently exist for 11.4 in bugzilla, close what is fixed and confirm what still needs some work. It’s all part of a final push for a great 11.4 release, with us clearing out what is fixed, the developers can focus their energies on fixing bugs instead of clicking around in bugzilla! We will meet, hang out and coordinate during the Open-Bugs-Day in the IRC channel #opensuse-testing on the Freenode network and anyone using openSUSE is welcome to help. Read on to learn more about how you can make a difference.

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openSUSE Bug Day on Saturday, November 27th

November 22nd, 2010 by

At the last openSUSE project meeting and after the discussion about zombie bugs on the opensuse-project mailing list, a small team of volunteers agreed to organize a Bug Day and being available to guide new contributors. Come to the #opensuse-bug channel on the freenode network at Saturday 27.11.2010, we’ll be glad to have you join the fun!

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All play and no work makes Geeko a peppy lizard!

October 14th, 2010 by

The conference social event takes place at the 21. Octover, 19:00 in the Lizard Lounge at Maxfeldstrasse 5, 90409 Nürnberg

OSC2010 Sneak Peaks – Bernhard Wiedemann: Automated Testing

September 22nd, 2010 by
The openSUSE Conference brings together users, contributors and friends of the openSUSE project from 20th to 23rd October in Nuremberg, Germany. Over four days, more than seventy talks and workshops explore the theme of ‘Collaboration Across Borders‘ in Free and Open Source software communities, administration and development. The conference is the yearly get-together of the openSUSE project to give its people a chance to meet face to face, talk to and inspire each other. It takes place in the Berufsförderungswerk Nuremberg in the beautiful surroundings of the Franconian metropole. Everybody interested is welcome to join and enjoy the program which starts each day at 9am, the admission is free.



The openSUSE Conference 2010 Sneak Peaks will introduce some speakers and talks to you. This time we explore the automatism’s inside our testing team together with Bernhard Wiedemann.

Bernhard! How many ISOs did you boot today? :-)

Hi Henne! None today, as factory is slow providing new ones. But I ran three ISOs yesterday, finding a new segfault.

Ah darn, I thought you would spit out an interesting high number!

But the total number of runs since I started counting in April is already quite impressive!

wc -l video/runlog.txt
1525 video/runlog.txt

So this is what you do and this is what you talk is about right? You came up with a neat way to test our distribution. But before we explore that how about you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I am who I am. A geek, a programmer, a father, a husband… sometimes even a poet and a philosopher. Thinking is one of the hardest things to do, this is probably why so few people do it.

Where are you from and how did you come to the openSUSE testing team?

Ick bin eeen Berliner” to use a famous quote. To the testing team I came by coincidence as so many great things in live. I saw the message from Holgi (the founder of the testing team) on the forums when he was looking for members.

Could you explain to us what testing exactly means?

When we started the Testing Core Team (the “Core” is intended to let people know that others can and should do testing as well) I only had a vague idea of what testing could be. One part is systematic testing. e.g. Larry Finger has been trying all encryption modes of wireless lan in combination with static and dynamic address assignment… but then there is the other testing which is just “using” beta releases and reporting issues because some issues are only spotted when you really try to use software.

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OSC2010 Sneak Peaks – Vincent Untz: Explaining GNOME 3

September 15th, 2010 by
The openSUSE Conference brings together users, contributors and friends of the openSUSE project from 20th to 23rd October in Nuremberg, Germany. Over four days, more than seventy talks and workshops explore the theme of ‘Collaboration Across Borders‘ in Free and Open Source software communities, administration and development. The conference is the yearly get-together of  the openSUSE project to give its people a chance to meet face to face, talk to and inspire each other. It takes place in the Berufsförderungswerk Nuremberg in the beautiful surroundings of the Franconian metropole. Everybody interested is welcome to join and enjoy the program which starts each day at 9am, the admission is free. The openSUSE Conference 2010 Sneak Peaks will introduce some speakers and talks to you.

Today we feature the talk “Explaining GNOME 3″ from Vincent Untz.


Hey Vincent, glad to have you on this series. Let’s talk (about) the talk. First of all I would like you to introduce yourself to the, likely, small crowd of people who don’t know you yet. Who are you and what do you do?

For the very few people who don’t know me (I estimate there are only a few billions out there), I’m Vincent. The two important things to know about me are that I’m French and I love ice cream. And when I’m not eating ice cream, I also contribute to free software! I work on openSUSE and on GNOME, and apparently, I can also work on both at the same time, when I work on GNOME in openSUSE :-) Thanks to Novell, I can contribute on my work time since I’m a member of the openSUSE Boosters.

… and here we are, thinking you only eat baguettes!

So, obviously, I don’t know if your baguette comment will end up in the interview. But if it does, I have to mention that ice cream and baguettes do not mix well.

Everything will end up in the interview, so behave! :) Okay given the title of your talk, Explaining GNOME 3, i take it it will be about explaining gnome 3 right? What needs explaining there?

Ah, I guess, one thing to know about me too is that I submit talks with titles, without knowing what I’ll talk about ;-) So it could well be that “Explaining GNOME 3″ turns out to be about something completely different. That being said, I might keep the submitted topic since GNOME 3 is a big step for the GNOME project, and what we are trying to achieve is not always crystal clear from the outside. There are at least two parts of the talks that I can think of right now, which will likely be of interest to the audience:

  1. Why does the GNOME project need to do GNOME 3, instead of keeping the 2.x way forever? After all, GNOME 2.x is all about evolutionary steps, and that’s something we could keep doing.
  2. The vision of what we want GNOME 3 to be. People do not always see the long-term vision of a project, and clarifying it does help understand the changes we’re implementing.

A third part that we feel is important is explaining GNOME Shell: it’s a big move where people feel it will directly affect their interaction with the computer

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We’re a happy family – The Boosters are hiring!

August 5th, 2010 by

The openSUSE Boosters are a team of people helping developers of the openSUSE project to take off. It consists of people with skills ranging from low level C hackery over Ruby on Rails mastering to graphical design or project management. The team picks milestones and works on them in a agile fashion. They always follow their mantra: Grow community by enabling community

The openSUSE Boosters team is looking for an experienced software engineer to join their efforts.

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Conference Meeting

July 28th, 2010 by

This meeting is meant to discuss organization of the openSUSE Conference. The goal for this meeting is to bring everybody up to speed on the conference organization. We discuss what has been done by whom and what needs to be done by whom.

New wiki, what now?

July 12th, 2010 by

We just switched to the new wiki. So here it is. And now? Let me explain what you can do to help!

Create your user page

Every user of the wiki has a personal page and we did not transfer any of them. We wanted to use this opportunity to brush them up and standardize them. Your userpage should be your first task in the new wiki. If your username is Geeko, just go to http://en.opensuse.org/User:Geeko and press “create”.  After that load the userpage teamplate by pressing on the “Load” button. Then fill out the form and you will get a nice standardized userpage!

You can also of course transfer your old userpage. Just go to http://old-en.opensuse.org/User:Geeko to find the content.

Report Missing Pages

Can’t find your page? Think we missed something? Just report the page to the opensuse wiki team! We will try our best to help you getting it back!

Transfer Missing Pages

Want to get your hands dirty? Dive right into the new wiki and learn how it works on the Wiki Portal or the previous posts on this blog. After you did that and know all the new wiki Kung-fu you go and find the pages you think are missing on http://old-en.opensuse.org. Now you have two options, either use the Special:Export page on the old wiki and the Special:Import on the new wiki if you want to transfer the article with all of its history or you just copy and paste the article if the history is not that important.

Otherwise just

Keep Calm And Carry On

The devil is in the details – What changes on monday for the wiki oldtimers?

July 8th, 2010 by

A couple of days ago I gave you the big picture on what will happen to en.opensuse.org on Monday when we switch to the new wiki. Now let me go into the nitty gritty details of the change to the new wiki. I especially want to focus on the changes important for the people who are familiar with the old wiki. Here we go.

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openSUSE Wiki – Episode II: A new hope

July 5th, 2010 by

You hear it in the bushes since quite some time, rumors spread and people whisper about it: A new wiki for the openSUSE project is coming very soon! The openSUSE Wiki team is in the last preparations to launch the new wiki on

Monday the 12th of July

As with all shiny new things the new wiki is different than the old one. But different how? You can sum that up in one word: Structure

The current wiki, online since the start of the openSUSE project in 2005,  grew wild into something that is not maintainable anymore. This is because content in it is in no way structured and we use it as a simple information dump. We don’t have any rules on how to present information or how to connect it to related bits and everybody is just adding pages. It makes adding content very easy but it neglects completely the biggest group of users of this wiki: the readers. On a normal day we have 10 people adding and 78.000 reading content. Yet we do very little to ensure that those 78.000 people find what they are looking for.

This is about to change. We, the openSUSE Wiki Team,  sat down and thought about the wiki. What is it and for whom is it for? Why can’t we maintain it? What are the most common complaints? And how can we solve this with the resources we have? We had a very lively discussion about this in the winter and afterward started to explore the options we have. We tried and discussed a lot methods, rules and mediawiki extensions. We came to the conclusion that we need to structure the content for the user-groups we have, provide better means of navigation than simple links, work on standardized templates and make sure that the most prominent content is of a acceptable quality.

Structure

The content in the new wiki is separated by topic in a couple of namespaces. Most prominently the main namespace (with no prefix) for the presentation of the latest openSUSE Distribution, think of it as the product brochure, for people who are new to openSUSE and maybe to Linux in general. The support database’s SDB: namespace for people who have a problem with the openSUSE distribution and seek written instruction on how to solve it. And the openSUSE community’s openSUSE: namespace to collaboratively write on documentation for their projects and teams. With namespaces we ensure that the right content in the right form reaches the right users.

Navigation

Navigation happens now through portals. Portals are entry points for a specific topic, similar to the main page. They provide an overview over a topic and guide readers to the content they seek which is either another portal or an individual article. Also categorization is very important so we can automatically generate overview pages and navigational structures. With these rules for navigation we ensure that our readers find the content we produce.

Styling

Styling of content happens through templates. There are 2 kinds, templates for a specific kind of article like the general article template, like the one for Portals or for support database articles and templates for styling of recurring content in articles like introduction and info boxes, hints and instructions or external sources and items. With these rules about styling we ensure that people understand the content we produce.

Quality assurance

Prominent namespaces (currently: Main & Portals) in the new wiki are subject to a quality assurance (QA) process to ensure articles meet the required quality. This QA process happens via a system which provides the opportunity to have several revisions of articles in parallel and one approved by the openSUSE Wiki Team. It does not limit creation of new content, but allows only quality content to be shown by default. With this process we ensure that first time visitors get drawn into page and stay.

Preview

You can see the current state of our preparations at our temporary location http://wiki.opensuse.org. Have fun exploring it and please don’t hesitate to contact us with ideas or problems on our mailinglist opensuse-wiki@opensuse.org.