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openSUSE Wiki – Episode II: A new hope

July 5th, 2010 by

You hear it in the bushes since quite some time, rumors spread and people whisper about it: A new wiki for the openSUSE project is coming very soon! The openSUSE Wiki team is in the last preparations to launch the new wiki on

Monday the 12th of July

As with all shiny new things the new wiki is different than the old one. But different how? You can sum that up in one word: Structure

The current wiki, online since the start of the openSUSE project in 2005,  grew wild into something that is not maintainable anymore. This is because content in it is in no way structured and we use it as a simple information dump. We don’t have any rules on how to present information or how to connect it to related bits and everybody is just adding pages. It makes adding content very easy but it neglects completely the biggest group of users of this wiki: the readers. On a normal day we have 10 people adding and 78.000 reading content. Yet we do very little to ensure that those 78.000 people find what they are looking for.

This is about to change. We, the openSUSE Wiki Team,  sat down and thought about the wiki. What is it and for whom is it for? Why can’t we maintain it? What are the most common complaints? And how can we solve this with the resources we have? We had a very lively discussion about this in the winter and afterward started to explore the options we have. We tried and discussed a lot methods, rules and mediawiki extensions. We came to the conclusion that we need to structure the content for the user-groups we have, provide better means of navigation than simple links, work on standardized templates and make sure that the most prominent content is of a acceptable quality.

Structure

The content in the new wiki is separated by topic in a couple of namespaces. Most prominently the main namespace (with no prefix) for the presentation of the latest openSUSE Distribution, think of it as the product brochure, for people who are new to openSUSE and maybe to Linux in general. The support database’s SDB: namespace for people who have a problem with the openSUSE distribution and seek written instruction on how to solve it. And the openSUSE community’s openSUSE: namespace to collaboratively write on documentation for their projects and teams. With namespaces we ensure that the right content in the right form reaches the right users.

Navigation

Navigation happens now through portals. Portals are entry points for a specific topic, similar to the main page. They provide an overview over a topic and guide readers to the content they seek which is either another portal or an individual article. Also categorization is very important so we can automatically generate overview pages and navigational structures. With these rules for navigation we ensure that our readers find the content we produce.

Styling

Styling of content happens through templates. There are 2 kinds, templates for a specific kind of article like the general article template, like the one for Portals or for support database articles and templates for styling of recurring content in articles like introduction and info boxes, hints and instructions or external sources and items. With these rules about styling we ensure that people understand the content we produce.

Quality assurance

Prominent namespaces (currently: Main & Portals) in the new wiki are subject to a quality assurance (QA) process to ensure articles meet the required quality. This QA process happens via a system which provides the opportunity to have several revisions of articles in parallel and one approved by the openSUSE Wiki Team. It does not limit creation of new content, but allows only quality content to be shown by default. With this process we ensure that first time visitors get drawn into page and stay.

Preview

You can see the current state of our preparations at our temporary location http://wiki.opensuse.org. Have fun exploring it and please don’t hesitate to contact us with ideas or problems on our mailinglist opensuse-wiki@opensuse.org.

Get Boostered at LinuxTag 2010

June 8th, 2010 by
Get boostered at the LinuxTag

LinuxTag is starting tomorrow. Swing by Berlin and get a lift from the openSUSE Boosters.

openSUSE@LinuxTag 2010

May 4th, 2010 by

LinuxTag 2010 is around the corner. There will be openSUSE Rock ‘N’ Roll from June 9 to 12 at the Berlin Fairgrounds! We just received word that our project got accepted for a booth and that we have 13 talks in the program of the free conference.

Conference Programm

The talks with openSUSE people involved range from SUSE Studio to HA for openVPN and spread from Wednesday to the very crowded Saturday. Here is a complete list.

SUSE Studio – Easily create software appliances for the cloud and moreWith James Tan.

In this presentation, James will show how quick and easy it is to create, test, and deploy appliances using SUSE Studio.

Libyui – Universal User Interface Development Library - With Katarina Machalkova.

This talk will introduce libyui internals and guide the user from developing a very simple “Hello World” program to creating a complex application in one of the language bindings.

MonoDevelop – Eine freie IDE für GTK- Mike Krüger

This talk will introduce to Monodevelop and GTK#. You will see some demonstrations of the concepts of an IDE.

High availability setup of openVPN – With Lars Vogdt and Martin Caj

This paper starts with a short overview of the involved Services (DRBD, Pacermaker, openVPN, LDAP) and shows the detailed dependencies and configuration options of those services to make the openVPN access a high availability service.

Ruby on Rails in der openSUSE.org Infrastruktur – With Thomas Schmidt

This talk will give you an insight into the methods of development and maintenance of the openSUSE systems based on Ruby on Rails.

RANSRID – Redundant Array of Non- Striped Really Independent Disks – With Matthias Hopf

How to store low frequency accessed files with lower power consumption and lower failure rate than RAID.

Open Source und Film – das Kino wird frei – With Sirko Kemter

This talk gives an overview about the world of open source movies and shows the different chances to finance such projects.

Kernel Mode Setting – a Change in Paradigms for the Graphics Driver Stack – With Egbert Eich

This talk is to give an overview over KMS, it’s benefits and it’s implementation both from the kernel and from the user space point of view.

The road to GNOME 3.0 – With Vincent Untz and Johannes Schmid

In this talk, we will explain the successes and limitations of GNOME 2.x that lead to the decision to start the new 3.0 effort, and we will study the planning methods that are used to release GNOME 3.0 in a way as painless as possible — both for distributors and users.

Distribution Image building with KIWI – With Christopher Hofmann

This talk briefly introduces the KIWI image system and shows how to create images based on openSUSE.

The live A-Z Guide to openSUSE Contribution – With Henne Vogelsang and Vincent Untz

From A like Artwork (we guess you already heard of Vincents ninjaesque GIMP techniques) to Z like ZYPP, the linux software management engine. If you always wanted to know how you contribute back to a distribution, this is your chance to learn how.

The Free Software Hell And How To Escape It РWith Adrian Schr̦ter and Henne Vogelsang

After it is possible for users of software to easily escape the famous dependency hell with smart and user-friendly package managers this talk will show you how free and open source software developers can escape the next circle – The Free Software Distribution Hell.

WebYaST – remote Web based system management – With Ladislav Slezak

This talk presents WebYaST which is the Web interface for the YaST system management tool.

Booth Setup


We are currently working on a Booth setup which includes a showroom of the latest developments in our beloved distribution which will be around release candidate one (RC1) during that time and we plan to release and show the next generation Build Service. The booth will also feature hack sessions for contributors, or people who want to become one, lead by the openSUSE Boosters. In these up and close hack sessions, with a small number of participants, a Booster will teach you all about a way to contribute to openSUSE and/or open source in general. Topics include hacking your first plasmoid, rolling your first package in the build service, fixing your first openSUSE bug or building your first distribution with KIWI.

So grab your laptop and make yourself ready to go to Berlin! Oh and if you are interested in helping to plan or man our booth, have ideas for a hack-session we could do or in general want to get in touch with us about LinuxTag don’t miss the openSUSE Project Meetings every other Wednesday on IRC. Looking forward to see you there.

Number Two Always Tries Harder: openSUSE Milestone 2

February 17th, 2010 by

Milestone 2Late last month we released the first milestone of openSUSE 11.3, now we follow up with the second. Milestone 2 is part of the milestones where we track new releases in the open source universe and test the building of our various distribution images with them. While milestone 1 introduced various pre-release versions of free and open source projects (KDE 4.4 RC1, OpenOffice 3.2 Beta4 or VirtualBox 3.1 beta 1) into our development distribution openSUSE Factory, this milestone is characterized by final releases of those projects. We are also preparing everything to switch to GCC 4.5.0 as the default compiler. Currently our staging version of Factory already builds with it and our compiler people document/fix the most serious issues, they aim at milestone 3 for the switch. To learn more about the benefits of GCC 4.5.0 check the Development Tools section below. As you can see, although we are steadily moving forward, there is still a lot to come!

Go on to read about the detailed changes that happened in the various areas…

(more…)

Project Meeting

February 9th, 2010 by

Participants of the openSUSE Project will meet in the channel #opensuse-project on the freenode IRC network and everyone is welcome to join in and participate! This meeting is meant to discuss the latest developments in and around openSUSE.

You can find and edit the agenda and read the meeting minutes on past meetings on our meeting page in the openSUSE wiki

Its here! openSUSE 11.3 Milestone 1

February 1st, 2010 by

Download Now!Its here! The first openSUSE 11.3 Milestone. This is the first step toward the next openSUSE release. The most important goal of this first milestone is to test the build interactions between newly added features in openSUSE Factory, also known as “get the snapshot to build”. It is in no way feature complete or ready for daily usage. There is no code freeze for any component yet, so many major changes are still to come.

This 11.3 Milestone build will give you a first glimpse of the direction we are pushing the distribution. Read more to learn about the major changes that happened since the release of openSUSE 11.2.

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openSUSE @ FOSDEM 2010

January 19th, 2010 by

It is that time of the year again!

FOSDEM, the Free and Open Source Software Developers' European Meeting

FOSDEM will take place at the first weekend in February (6th/7th) in Brussels and we’re going to attend. There is a buttload of tracks, devrooms and lightning talks to visit. Including, but not limited to: Security, Scalability, Monitoring, Distributions, KDE, GNOME, Ruby on Rails, X.org, LiMux, csync, GeeXboX and so on and so on. You should check the Schedule. Of course also the famous exhibition exhaust pipe hallway will be back once more with project booths ranging from CAcert to Zarafa Community.

Our project will attend mostly in the individual project’s devrooms and together with CentOS, Debian, Fedora and Mandriva in the distribution mini-conference that will happen. Of  course we also have a booth to show off and hand out promo DVD”s of the greatest distribution on this planet. We hope you seize this opportunity to meet, learn from, get inspired by and shape the community that will gather at the the best Free Software and Open Source event in Europe!

openSUSE Conference: Social Events

September 9th, 2009 by

The openSUSE Conference isn’t just an opportunity to work together — it’s also an opportunity to play together. During the conference, we’ll have several activities for attendees to get together and have a lot of fun!

Conference Social Event

joes tavern
Work Hard, Play Harder! – That will be the motto for Thursday Night. We’ll convert part of the Novell Office into Joe’s Tavern and everybody from the conference is invited to join us for some ice-cold Stuff and Flaming Joe’s! The party will get going at 7PM. Food, drinks and entertainment will be provided. See the “How to get there” page on, guess what, how to get there. The Office is also on the Conference Map.

When: Thursday the 17th of September, 7 PM
Where: Joe’s Tavern, Maxfeldstrasse 5, 90409 Nürnberg
 
 
 
 

Creative Commons Short Film Nights

kommkinoMovies free to copy and distribute. Movies that can be shared both with friends and with the Internet community. For many that’s hard to believe, but it’s reality. Thanks to Creative Commons, which is established as both an alternative and a complement to the traditional ways of commercial distribution when it comes to media. The Creative Commons night at the KommKino Nuremberg will show that the CC-model is also working for the distribution of short films. Together with the openSUSE Conference the KommKino will show short movies and music videos licensed under Creative Commons-licenses on Friday and Saturday. Everyone who brings an USB-Stick, external harddrive or notebook will be able to take the movies home. The movies start at 9:15 PM, admission is free. The KommKino is very close to the Main Railway Station. See the Conference Map and the “How to get there” page for directions.

When: Friday the 18th of September, 9:15 PM
Saturday the 19th of September, 9:15 PM
Where: KommKino, Königstrasse 93, 90402 Nürnberg

Get Going. openSUSE:Contrib ready!

December 17th, 2008 by

It’s alive! In an effort to bring another joy of contributing to the openSUSE distribution a new team, process and package repository just recently saw the light of day: openSUSE:Contrib

Contrib logo

The openSUSE:Contrib repository is an extension of the openSUSE distribution. The goal is simple: making maintainership of packages in the openSUSE distribution possible for everyone. Currently with openSUSE Factory it is “only” possible to do code-contribution in the form of patches sent through the collaboration features of the openSUSE Build Service. While that is fine it is missing an important motivation bit: responsibility. Having responsibility for a piece of software inside a Linux distribution is a demanding but rewarding task and it is also the one task that is essential to the whole distribution business because that’s what a distribution is, a collection of packages. No matter if you create a nice desktop wallpaper or hack on a system service, if you want it to end up on the distribution you have to squeeze it into a package and use the whole process around that. With openSUSE:Contrib it is now possible for everyone to do that for the openSUSE distributions. So if you have experience in RPM packaging and you miss a piece of software in the openSUSE distribution join the openSUSE:Contrib team to scratch that itch. For starters you should read the openSUSE:Contrib wiki page and subscribe yourself to the openSUSE:Contrib mailing list. See you around!

New Mailing Lists Available

April 16th, 2008 by

Hey ho, we have a few new mailing lists available.

To discuss openSUSE usage on the different virtualization products like Qemu/KVM, XEN or VirtualBox subscribe to opensuse-virtual. If you are one of our many users from the Czech Republic (nazdar lidi!) you should subscribe to opensuse-cz and discuss openSUSE with other users there. A little while ago we created opensuse-features that broadcasts every change related to openSUSE in the feature database, opensuse-nl for users from the Netherlands and some new translation lists: German, Spanish, Russian, Slovakian and Hungarian. For more information on how to use these lists or what other mailing lists we have head over to the Mailinglist page on our wiki.