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openSUSE Summit Was Geeko Awesome

November 18th, 2013 by

Orlando - not so sunny

Our openSUSE Summit 2013 has just finished here in Orlando. We were hosted in a Mexican themed hotel in the area of Disney World, with our own special area setup nicely for our presentations and workshops. The location was a nice new touch for the geeko friends to reconnect and collaborate, if only because there was a large number of lizards all around here!

Weather wasn’t very loving down here in Florida, USA but being in such a family-like get together, it didn’t really matter. (more…)

Sneak Peek openSUSE 13.1: What we have for GNOME Users

October 29th, 2013 by
GNOME Shell GNOME 13.1

Clean GNOME Shell

Welcome to our third Sneak Peek of what is coming in openSUSE 13.1! You’ve already learned about the new Cloud features and YaST having been ported to Ruby and  it’s time to talk about… our desktops! We kick this off with GNOME 3.10.

Sticking with our philosophy for shipping the latest and the greatest, openSUSE 13.1 will offer GNOME 3.10 at installation. A great deal has changed since 3.6, and many new features have been added. The GNOME experience is now more coherent and complete with the addition of new apps and the polishing of Gnome-Shell. GNOME has become a solid desktop environment, beautiful to work in and suitable for every kind of daily operation. (more…)

GSoC 2013 – Half Way Through

August 19th, 2013 by

GSoc 2013 logo
We have reached the half way stage of the Google Summer of Code 2013, and it has been an exciting journey so far. A lot of good work has been done this summer on a variety of projects. This year, we have co-participated with ownCloud, Balabit (syslog-ng) and Hedgewars under the openSUSE umbrella. Here follows a summary of the work that has been done so far, along with the experiences of the students.

AppArmor Profile Tool

Kshitij Gupta is developing profile tools for AppArmor, which involves writing the perl tools and core modules in python. He is being mentored by Christian Boltz. The tools are expected to be completed on time, since they are built on the core modules. Kshitij labels working on the GSoC project as a ‘phenomenal’ time.
comments in action in OBS

OBS Discussion System

Shayon Mukherjee is building a discussion system for the Open Build Service, under the guidance of Henne and Adrian. The results have been pretty good so far. According to Shayon, they have built the functionality for the users to be able to post comments on projects, packages and requests in the Open Build Service. They are really excited and believe its a great functionality, and that users of the OBS will benefit greatly from it. Before GSoC ends, they plan to make it possible for users to edit/delete comments via Hermes, the openSUSE notification system. He adds that he has learned a lot in the last month about a complicated, full stack web app.

The initial result of the application can be found in action here.
OSEM

OSEM

Stella (differentreality) is working on Open Source Event Management Tool(OSEM), mentored by Theo Chatzimichos, and Matt Barringer. We saw her work in action at the openSUSE Conference and we’re all wondering how she managed to combine working on OSEM with organizing the event… On the other hand, the practical needs were driving OSEM development and this of course leads to a very good application and more fun.

User Management Application on ownCloud

Raghu Nayyar is writing the User Management Application for ownCloud. He has written the front end on AngularJS and is currently working on syncing it with the backend. He will also be working on the front end of the files application, which forms a major part of ownCloud. He is being mentored by Jan Christoph Bochardt and Posselt Bernhard.
owncloud Music app

Music App for ownCloud

Morris Jobke is working on the Music App for ownCloud, based on a RESTful API. Morris plans to add support for playlist management and the music filtering. He is being mentored by Jorn Friedrich Dreyer and Posselt Bernhard.

Syslog-ng MySQL destination:

Gyula Petrovics is writing the MySQL Destination driver for syslog-ng. The idea is to insert syslog messages into a MySQL database. Gyula is being mentored by Victor Tusa.
hedgewars going strong

Hedgewars Campaign Mission

Periklis Ntanasis is creating a new Hedgewars Mission campaign. He is about halfway from the end, and is quite satisfied with the end result so far. He is being mentored by kyber (nemo) from Hedgewars

Other Projects:

The other projects in action for Google Summer of Code are:

  • Github Code Review for CLI, by Xystushi, under bamboo
  • Automatic Resizing of LVM Volumes by Akif Khan, under Dinar Valeev
  • IaaS Cloud Framework for software packaging and documentation by intijk, under Robert Schweikert
  • syslog-ng redis destination by tichy, under Gergely Nagy

So far, it has been an awesome ride, with the coding work going at full swing. Now, the students must Geeko up to scrub code, write test cases and finish the documentation tasks. The Soft Pencils Down’ date is September 16, followed by the ‘Firm Pencils Down’ date on 23rd September.

Article contributed by Saurabh Sood

Announcing the openSUSE Summit 2013

July 15th, 2013 by

While everyone is certainly looking forward to the upcoming openSUSE Conference in Thessaloniki, Greece (only a few days away) it is not too early to cast our view just a bit into the future and also get excited about our second openSUSE Summit. Especially for those on the west side of the big pond, a.k.a. The Atlantic, that may not be able to trek to Greece to join fellow Geekos the openSUSE Summit offers a great opportunity to meet fellow Geekos, hang out, chat, hack and Have a lot of Fun…. As in the previous year the openSUSE Summit will immediately follow SUSECon.

The openSUSE Summit will take place at the Disney Corronado Springs Resort in Buena Vista, Florida (just outside Orlando) from November 15 to November 17, 2013. Those registering prior to November 1st will get free access to the remaining session of SUSECon that take place on Friday November 15. (more…)

Geeko Pumping Iron Session – openSUSE ARM Hackathon

March 19th, 2013 by

opensuse-arm
Now that openSUSE 12.3 is out, the openSUSE ARM Team want to step up a gear. As the cycle was shorter than normal, there are a few wrinkles that need to be ironed out and also a whole heap of new things that can be added. After some discussion at FOSDEM, it was decided to hold a Hackathon to address these items. The Hackathon will take place on 8 to 12 April, both at the SUSE offices in Nuremberg as well as online for those that can’t attend in person. (more…)

openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 2 released

December 18th, 2012 by

A month’s work since Milestone 1 shows that the new Release Team are hitting their stride, as they have reviewed and checked in more than 470 updated packages, far more than early milestones in previous releases.

Desktops and apps

The biggest update is in LibreOffice, which jumps from 3.5.4 to 3.6.3. This new version of the office suite fixes a lot of annoying bugs and improves DOCX compatibility. Also this release includes a lot of new functionality, like adding the Lanczos image algorithm for resizing, which reduces aliasing in resized images. In Calc, there are several new functions, like support for color scales and data bars in XLSX and ODS document formats. Please check the release notes for a full description of the main fixes and new features.

In a change to policy, KDE 4.10 Beta 2 has been added to Factory already. Usually only finished KDE releases are added, but since more KDE team developers are working on Factory, it made sense to perform early integration and testing in Factory now. So, if everything goes as planned, the final version of openSUSE will arrive in March including KDE 4.10.0 or 4.10.1 (expected in the first week of March). This new version of KDE increases the Qt Quick usage in Plasma Workspaces. In 4.10, additional desktop components are implemented using this declarative technology instead of C++ for greater stability and easier theming. Okular now uses less memory when zooming in on big PDFs, and a new indexer replaces the last Strigi components, allows faster and more reliable indexing of documents. You can expect much more functionality and bug fixing in the final release of KDE 4.10.

Other KDE changes include kwebkitpart 1.3, which adds Access Key support, automatic scrolling and manual spell checking support for forms, as well as on demand plugin loading; and appmenu-qt joins the standard installation, allowing application menus to be shown at the top of the screen or in a menu button on the window border.

After a period of stabilization work, GNOME 3.6.3 found its way into this milestone. The GNOME interface for PackageKit is at version 3.6.1, which fixes a segfault error when a distribution upgrade is available. This GNOME version is better integrated with systemd, and has a new “Airplane Mode”, that switches off all radios, including Bluetooth.

Claws Mail has been updated to 3.9. This little GTK email client and news reader is known for being fast, extensible and easy to configure. It adds IMAP server side search, has several speed-ups and optimizations, a better GnuPG integration and more than thirty bug fixes.

Platform

The GNU C library was updated. glibc 2.17 improves ARM and multi-arch subsystems, and adds fixes for crypto bugs. DBUS 1.6.8 includes new service ownership rule possibilities, and many security, bugs, and performance fixes.

Another updated package is QEMU, which goes from 1.2.0 to 1.3.0. With QEMU we can easily create and run virtual machines. This new version improves  live migrations of virtual machines. That means that we can now stop a virtual machine and continue the execution in another place without noticeable problems. QEMU 1.3.0 adds many newly virtualized devices and chipsets.

LLVM is one of those cool projects that everyone knows, but few can exactly say what it is. Fascinate Xmas parties with the knowledge that LLVM is a set of libraries that allow aggressive optimizations of a intermediate ad-hoc language (known as LLVM IR) and the compilation of this language to a specific architecture and processor. Clang is a C / C++ / Objective-C compiler that translate the high level language to this IR language, and is a really fast compiler. If this description interests you, then you’ll be pleased to know that M2 updates LLVM/Clang to 3.2rc2. This version of LLVM improves the Clang diagnostics, this means that we will have better error messages that explain more clearly what mistakes we are making. LLDB is the new command line debugger for LLVM/Clang. It uses the Clang parser for the C++ debugger. And there is a lot of new functionality in the optimizer, like a new high-level loop optimizer and the automatic parallelizer.

Mono 3 now has a complete C# 5.0 compiler, with all the async functionality enabled, and adds interesting optimizations in the garbage collector (mainly for SMP systems) and in the runtime library. This is a big version change, so may cause breakage with Mono 2.10 code.

This milestone comes with a 3.6 kernel, but don’t despair, packages for 3.7 are already cooking.

Distribution

libzypp 12.5 includes new package management transaction logging features.

As part of the SuSEconfig removal work, permissions now applies changes following installation or upgrade, to ensure new permissions are effective regardless of package installation order.

 

Report: Successful openSUSE GSOC

September 28th, 2012 by

This summer, openSUSE had a great experience for the fifth time participating in the Summer of Code. While working on the list of ideas for GSoC projects, we decided to encourage students to apply not only for openSUSE-specific projects, but also for projects that would be useful to our upstreams and to other distributions. We love working with other organizations, and that is why we always try to push for more collaboration.

Nine of our students successfully completed their projects, and we’d like to share what they’ve done. (more…)

openSUSE and GSOC 2012: Good to Go!

April 26th, 2012 by

GSOC Geeko 2012
Google published the list of 12 students proposals that have been accepted for Google Summer of Code 2012 for openSUSE. It means that 12 students will be able to work full-time on changing the world this summer! (more…)

SUSE Hackweek 7 – Next Week

September 22nd, 2011 by

One of the ways SUSE and its developers contribute to openSUSE is through Hackweek: – a week long sprint permitting developers to work on something entirely of their own design or wishes as long as it is FOSS-related. Started in 2007, it has become a regular part of SUSE’s development. This is in keeping in line with the openSUSE Project’s goal of being more than just an organization that benefits itself. We believe in a project that benefits the greater good of free and open software.SUSE Hackweek Logo

Some 150+ developers will have free reign to work on new applications or make improvements to other software projects. Hackweek also permits developers to push away from the grind of deadlines and “must fix” bug fixing (unless it’s a critical customer situation) which can be at times stressful and tedious.

So, how does this relate to the larger openSUSE community? First, some ideas come directly from openFATE, the openSUSE tracker for wish-list items and ways to help guide development of the distro: You can see the list of proposed Hackweek projects here, which will surely grow in the next few days.

Second, nothing blocks people outside the SUSE staff from participating. Most importanly, it shows that SUSE is an innovative distribution whose contributions make open source better for everyone.

And third, it follows openSUSE’s motto: Have a lot of fun ! Hackweek has it’s own motto: “No Motto, do what you want, but do it!”

We asked Jürgen Weigert and Pavol Rusnak, developers from SUSE, to explain how they participate

Q: How does someone from the openSUSE community participate Can they also have their own project?

Jürgen: Yes, they can work together with others (check openFATE for a list) or do their own project.

Pavol: But for doing their own project they don’t have to wait for Hackweek, right? :-)

Q: Can you give some examples of projects which were started from Hackweek ?

Pavol: SAT-solver used in zypper by Michael Schroeder, Fifth Leg font by Jakub Steiner, SUSE Paste by Michal Hrušecký and cnetworkmanager by Martin Vidner.

Jürgen: Polka by Cornelius Schumacher, YaSTroid by Stephen Shaw.

Q: What will you work on during this coming Hackweek ?

Jürgen: Make EyeFI sdcard work with Linux – see Fate#312811

Pavol: Rewrite spec-cleaner into Ruby – see Fate#312823

Q: What other projects are planned for this upcoming Hackweek ?

Pavol: Getting Enlightenment 17 into Factory, various openQA additions, Continuous YaST testing in Jenkins and much much more!

Jürgen: Also hackers need catering and thus we will have food provided in the common area – and the common meal is also a great chance to discuss Hackweek projects face to face. The camera team will go around and record videos and upload those to blip.tv and YouTube. Also, there’s a rumor about some nice surprise. :-)

Q: For developers what is the most satisfying part of Hackweek ?

Jürgen: Switching topics to something completely different and extend my comfort zone by looking at new areas. This year it’s wireless, an area I never touched before as developer.

Pavol: Yeah, I think working on something unknown, unexplored is always exciting and challenging

Q: How does the openSUSE and the larger open source community benefit ?

Jürgen: Quite often it’s scratching my own itches – and if something is successful, it might become a successful open source project. I’ve seen some people interested in projects like Bretzn or ARM support for openSUSE that will benefit openSUSE directly. Some people which are surprised by the late announcement of this Hackweek have said that they will just have a look into the upcoming beta of openSUSE 12.1 – getting familiar with new technologies like systemd, report bugs and improve the distribution.

Pavol: Lots of the projects that are started during Hackweek are directly integrated into the following openSUSE release. Also if they are usable by others they are adopted by other distributions as well or merged directly into upstream which is cool!

Q: Are there any awards or competitions during Hackweek ?

Pavol: Previous years we had a small group of judges that went through the finished Hackweek projects in openFATE and awarded three developers with nice gadgets. I expect it will be similar this year, but I am not sure.

Jürgen: Yes – for those that register their projects in FATE. Details will be announced later.

Q: Is there anything else the larger openSUSE community should know about ?

Jürgen: The infrastructure teams will also participate in Hackweek and thus not make major changes – and also might not review openSUSE:Factory submissions directly. Please let them know if you run into serious issues.

Pavol: If you see a project in openFATE which you like, tell us so in the comments or vote for the feature. Also if you have some nice idea, feel free to put it in openFATE, maybe some undecided developer will find it interesting and implement it.

Q: Thanks for the interview.

Both: Thank you and have a lot of fun!

So, stay tuned for the results of Hackweek where everyone has a lot of fun!

article submitted by Peter Linnell

openSUSE 12.1 Beta taking more time to become good

September 21st, 2011 by

Last Friday Stephan Kulow, our openSUSE Release Manager, started a discussion on Factory mailing list about show-stoppers for the 12.1-Beta release scheduled for 2011-09-22.
It became clear that Factory still needs some polishing to become a useful Beta for large numbers of testers to try out..

Particularly, one of the reasons is the challenges relating to the switch to use systemd by default, which means that it is also Man in construction hat working on pipesused during install and first boot (which has the special configuration stuff).  And between the timing of last week’s openSUSE Conference and next week’s planned Hackweek, the Factory team agreed it is better to take the time to ensure a release that meets the level of quality that our openSUSE Distro is known for.

You can read more on this thread via our mailing list archive here.

This means, the Beta will be up to two weeks later than planned, and we’ll be sure to let you know as soon as it is ready for download.  On the bright side, this also means you have more time to prepare for the Beta Pizza Party in your home area.  And our final release date for openSUSE 12.1 is still targeted for November 11th.