Home Home
Sign up | Login

Author Archive

Spreading the Word on the Geeko – Support is Back!

May 21st, 2014 by

openSUSE Booth
Spreading the word about our project has again become a little bit easier. As announced during the Opening Keynote at oSC14 the reimbursement program for locally produced materials is BACK!

We would like to thank Jim Henderson, who will lead the team, Shawn Dunn, and Alexandros Vennos for volunteering their time to manage the requests. The program is funded with up to $200 US per event with a limit of $2000 US per quarter. The initiative is no limited to events as in small local conferences. If you need material for a local LUG meeting or if you can produce material for a “permanent” display of openSUSE in a University or other public place of interest use this program.

promoting openSUSE

How does it work?

The process is outlined in the wiki and will share the Travel Support Program application. Basically you will need to submit a request through the application prior to the time of need. The team will evaluate the information and get back to you in a reasonable amount of time. The team may also decide that it may be worth sending out a booth box instead of producing material locally. If you accept the booth box the request will be handled for you if booth boxes are available at the time. After you have approval you can go ahead and produce the material for the event/promotion campaign. Once the event is completed provide a report, blog post on lizards or your own blog for example and submit your receipts. That’s it. For permanent displays, the “event” is obviously “never” over, thus you’d just submit your receipt after you setup the display (hang up the posters), send along a picture and some advertisement, possibly on social media and that’s it.

We tried to keep things as simple as possible while still assuring that there’s some verifiable bang for the buck for our project. After all having posters hanging in someone’s basement does not hep us find more users or contributors.
Geeko's at the booth

What else?

A word on the booth boxes and larger events. A list of events where we would like to have people represent our project is in the works and will soon appear on the wiki. Booth boxes for those events have been set aside. Keep an eye out for an announcement about the events list and a call for advocates to represent the project. As a hint, OSCON is happening from July 20-24 in Portland Oregon and we have no one yet organizing a local team to show off openSUSE.

The local production reimbursement program is live and you can start using it today. As we are just starting out there are bound to be some rough edges, thus please be patient, provide as much feedback as possible about the process and the handling of things to allow everyone involved to improve the initiative for everyone that might want to take advantage of it.

Go and spread the word about openSUSE and Have a lot of fun…

Aufbruchstimmung…..Here is what you missed at oSC14

May 2nd, 2014 by

oSC14 took place in Dubrovnik, Croatia, attracting a large number of Geekos to give and attend talks, organize and attend workshops and have fun at the parties. Compared to previous conferences the attendance at oSC14 was unfortunately on the lighter side of things but never the less we all had a great time. Since oSC13 we certainly had our trials and tribulations which we have left behind us and the mood was extremely positive with everyone being ready to move forward. The many hallway discussions had people discussing the new booth boxes, the progress on openQA and the staging model for Factory development. We shared articles on the event already, had 13K viewers on Bambuser and here we try to provide a bit of a closing overview! (more…)

openSUSE Summit Was Geeko Awesome

November 18th, 2013 by

Orlando - not so sunny

Our openSUSE Summit 2013 has just finished here in Orlando. We were hosted in a Mexican themed hotel in the area of Disney World, with our own special area setup nicely for our presentations and workshops. The location was a nice new touch for the geeko friends to reconnect and collaborate, if only because there was a large number of lizards all around here!

Weather wasn’t very loving down here in Florida, USA but being in such a family-like get together, it didn’t really matter. (more…)

Sneak Peek openSUSE 13.1: What we have for GNOME Users

October 29th, 2013 by
GNOME Shell GNOME 13.1

Clean GNOME Shell

Welcome to our third Sneak Peek of what is coming in openSUSE 13.1! You’ve already learned about the new Cloud features and YaST having been ported to Ruby and  it’s time to talk about… our desktops! We kick this off with GNOME 3.10.

Sticking with our philosophy for shipping the latest and the greatest, openSUSE 13.1 will offer GNOME 3.10 at installation. A great deal has changed since 3.6, and many new features have been added. The GNOME experience is now more coherent and complete with the addition of new apps and the polishing of Gnome-Shell. GNOME has become a solid desktop environment, beautiful to work in and suitable for every kind of daily operation. (more…)

GSoC 2013 – Half Way Through

August 19th, 2013 by

GSoc 2013 logo
We have reached the half way stage of the Google Summer of Code 2013, and it has been an exciting journey so far. A lot of good work has been done this summer on a variety of projects. This year, we have co-participated with ownCloud, Balabit (syslog-ng) and Hedgewars under the openSUSE umbrella. Here follows a summary of the work that has been done so far, along with the experiences of the students.

AppArmor Profile Tool

Kshitij Gupta is developing profile tools for AppArmor, which involves writing the perl tools and core modules in python. He is being mentored by Christian Boltz. The tools are expected to be completed on time, since they are built on the core modules. Kshitij labels working on the GSoC project as a ‘phenomenal’ time.
comments in action in OBS

OBS Discussion System

Shayon Mukherjee is building a discussion system for the Open Build Service, under the guidance of Henne and Adrian. The results have been pretty good so far. According to Shayon, they have built the functionality for the users to be able to post comments on projects, packages and requests in the Open Build Service. They are really excited and believe its a great functionality, and that users of the OBS will benefit greatly from it. Before GSoC ends, they plan to make it possible for users to edit/delete comments via Hermes, the openSUSE notification system. He adds that he has learned a lot in the last month about a complicated, full stack web app.

The initial result of the application can be found in action here.
OSEM

OSEM

Stella (differentreality) is working on Open Source Event Management Tool(OSEM), mentored by Theo Chatzimichos, and Matt Barringer. We saw her work in action at the openSUSE Conference and we’re all wondering how she managed to combine working on OSEM with organizing the event… On the other hand, the practical needs were driving OSEM development and this of course leads to a very good application and more fun.

User Management Application on ownCloud

Raghu Nayyar is writing the User Management Application for ownCloud. He has written the front end on AngularJS and is currently working on syncing it with the backend. He will also be working on the front end of the files application, which forms a major part of ownCloud. He is being mentored by Jan Christoph Bochardt and Posselt Bernhard.
owncloud Music app

Music App for ownCloud

Morris Jobke is working on the Music App for ownCloud, based on a RESTful API. Morris plans to add support for playlist management and the music filtering. He is being mentored by Jorn Friedrich Dreyer and Posselt Bernhard.

Syslog-ng MySQL destination:

Gyula Petrovics is writing the MySQL Destination driver for syslog-ng. The idea is to insert syslog messages into a MySQL database. Gyula is being mentored by Victor Tusa.
hedgewars going strong

Hedgewars Campaign Mission

Periklis Ntanasis is creating a new Hedgewars Mission campaign. He is about halfway from the end, and is quite satisfied with the end result so far. He is being mentored by kyber (nemo) from Hedgewars

Other Projects:

The other projects in action for Google Summer of Code are:

  • Github Code Review for CLI, by Xystushi, under bamboo
  • Automatic Resizing of LVM Volumes by Akif Khan, under Dinar Valeev
  • IaaS Cloud Framework for software packaging and documentation by intijk, under Robert Schweikert
  • syslog-ng redis destination by tichy, under Gergely Nagy

So far, it has been an awesome ride, with the coding work going at full swing. Now, the students must Geeko up to scrub code, write test cases and finish the documentation tasks. The Soft Pencils Down’ date is September 16, followed by the ‘Firm Pencils Down’ date on 23rd September.

Article contributed by Saurabh Sood

Announcing the openSUSE Summit 2013

July 15th, 2013 by

While everyone is certainly looking forward to the upcoming openSUSE Conference in Thessaloniki, Greece (only a few days away) it is not too early to cast our view just a bit into the future and also get excited about our second openSUSE Summit. Especially for those on the west side of the big pond, a.k.a. The Atlantic, that may not be able to trek to Greece to join fellow Geekos the openSUSE Summit offers a great opportunity to meet fellow Geekos, hang out, chat, hack and Have a lot of Fun…. As in the previous year the openSUSE Summit will immediately follow SUSECon.

The openSUSE Summit will take place at the Disney Corronado Springs Resort in Buena Vista, Florida (just outside Orlando) from November 15 to November 17, 2013. Those registering prior to November 1st will get free access to the remaining session of SUSECon that take place on Friday November 15. (more…)

Geeko Pumping Iron Session – openSUSE ARM Hackathon

March 19th, 2013 by

opensuse-arm
Now that openSUSE 12.3 is out, the openSUSE ARM Team want to step up a gear. As the cycle was shorter than normal, there are a few wrinkles that need to be ironed out and also a whole heap of new things that can be added. After some discussion at FOSDEM, it was decided to hold a Hackathon to address these items. The Hackathon will take place on 8 to 12 April, both at the SUSE offices in Nuremberg as well as online for those that can’t attend in person. (more…)

openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 2 released

December 18th, 2012 by

A month’s work since Milestone 1 shows that the new Release Team are hitting their stride, as they have reviewed and checked in more than 470 updated packages, far more than early milestones in previous releases.

Desktops and apps

The biggest update is in LibreOffice, which jumps from 3.5.4 to 3.6.3. This new version of the office suite fixes a lot of annoying bugs and improves DOCX compatibility. Also this release includes a lot of new functionality, like adding the Lanczos image algorithm for resizing, which reduces aliasing in resized images. In Calc, there are several new functions, like support for color scales and data bars in XLSX and ODS document formats. Please check the release notes for a full description of the main fixes and new features.

In a change to policy, KDE 4.10 Beta 2 has been added to Factory already. Usually only finished KDE releases are added, but since more KDE team developers are working on Factory, it made sense to perform early integration and testing in Factory now. So, if everything goes as planned, the final version of openSUSE will arrive in March including KDE 4.10.0 or 4.10.1 (expected in the first week of March). This new version of KDE increases the Qt Quick usage in Plasma Workspaces. In 4.10, additional desktop components are implemented using this declarative technology instead of C++ for greater stability and easier theming. Okular now uses less memory when zooming in on big PDFs, and a new indexer replaces the last Strigi components, allows faster and more reliable indexing of documents. You can expect much more functionality and bug fixing in the final release of KDE 4.10.

Other KDE changes include kwebkitpart 1.3, which adds Access Key support, automatic scrolling and manual spell checking support for forms, as well as on demand plugin loading; and appmenu-qt joins the standard installation, allowing application menus to be shown at the top of the screen or in a menu button on the window border.

After a period of stabilization work, GNOME 3.6.3 found its way into this milestone. The GNOME interface for PackageKit is at version 3.6.1, which fixes a segfault error when a distribution upgrade is available. This GNOME version is better integrated with systemd, and has a new “Airplane Mode”, that switches off all radios, including Bluetooth.

Claws Mail has been updated to 3.9. This little GTK email client and news reader is known for being fast, extensible and easy to configure. It adds IMAP server side search, has several speed-ups and optimizations, a better GnuPG integration and more than thirty bug fixes.

Platform

The GNU C library was updated. glibc 2.17 improves ARM and multi-arch subsystems, and adds fixes for crypto bugs. DBUS 1.6.8 includes new service ownership rule possibilities, and many security, bugs, and performance fixes.

Another updated package is QEMU, which goes from 1.2.0 to 1.3.0. With QEMU we can easily create and run virtual machines. This new version improves  live migrations of virtual machines. That means that we can now stop a virtual machine and continue the execution in another place without noticeable problems. QEMU 1.3.0 adds many newly virtualized devices and chipsets.

LLVM is one of those cool projects that everyone knows, but few can exactly say what it is. Fascinate Xmas parties with the knowledge that LLVM is a set of libraries that allow aggressive optimizations of a intermediate ad-hoc language (known as LLVM IR) and the compilation of this language to a specific architecture and processor. Clang is a C / C++ / Objective-C compiler that translate the high level language to this IR language, and is a really fast compiler. If this description interests you, then you’ll be pleased to know that M2 updates LLVM/Clang to 3.2rc2. This version of LLVM improves the Clang diagnostics, this means that we will have better error messages that explain more clearly what mistakes we are making. LLDB is the new command line debugger for LLVM/Clang. It uses the Clang parser for the C++ debugger. And there is a lot of new functionality in the optimizer, like a new high-level loop optimizer and the automatic parallelizer.

Mono 3 now has a complete C# 5.0 compiler, with all the async functionality enabled, and adds interesting optimizations in the garbage collector (mainly for SMP systems) and in the runtime library. This is a big version change, so may cause breakage with Mono 2.10 code.

This milestone comes with a 3.6 kernel, but don’t despair, packages for 3.7 are already cooking.

Distribution

libzypp 12.5 includes new package management transaction logging features.

As part of the SuSEconfig removal work, permissions now applies changes following installation or upgrade, to ensure new permissions are effective regardless of package installation order.

 

Report: Successful openSUSE GSOC

September 28th, 2012 by

This summer, openSUSE had a great experience for the fifth time participating in the Summer of Code. While working on the list of ideas for GSoC projects, we decided to encourage students to apply not only for openSUSE-specific projects, but also for projects that would be useful to our upstreams and to other distributions. We love working with other organizations, and that is why we always try to push for more collaboration.

Nine of our students successfully completed their projects, and we’d like to share what they’ve done. (more…)

openSUSE and GSOC 2012: Good to Go!

April 26th, 2012 by

GSOC Geeko 2012
Google published the list of 12 students proposals that have been accepted for Google Summer of Code 2012 for openSUSE. It means that 12 students will be able to work full-time on changing the world this summer! (more…)