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What’s up on KDE repositories

April 4th, 2014 by

Dear KDE Users,

Maybe you have heard already about it from another openSUSE mailing list, a blog post or through our openSUSE community page on Google+, but the KDE repositories have been changed since last Tuesday. Below you will find the changes that were done based on the release of KDE 4.12.4.

Why was this changes needed

Based on a small discussion in the opensuse-kde mailinglist and feedback on our survey, we concluded that the majority is in favor of creating a single repository where we track the current KDE release.

Where are my old KDE repositories

The name for this repository will be KDE:Current and will initially be build for oS 12.3 and oS 13.1.

After the release of the KDE:Current repo, the repositories KDE:Release:XY have been cleaned and removed. Initially KDE:Current will be delivered with 4.12.4 as that the KDE 4.13 release is scheduled for mid April.

Also the repository KDE:Extra and KDE:Unstable:Extra will change as that some of the building targets (KDE:Release:XY) are disappearing and be replaced with KDE:Current.

Where should I find the new KDE repositories

The KDE Repository page KDE repositories has been updated to reflect the changes. We would like to ask those that have been working on the localization of this page in other languages, to
update their pages as well.

Regards,

Raymond

FreeDesktop Summit about to start

March 27th, 2014 by

Next week, from Monday the 31st of March to the 4th of April, developers from the major Linux Desktops (GNOME, KDE, Unity and RazorQt) will meet again in Nuremberg for the second FreeDesktop Summit.

The summit is a joint technical meeting from developers working on ‘desktop infrastructure’ on the major Free Desktop projects and the event aims to improve collaboration between the projects by discussing specifications and the sharing of platform-level components.

Like last year, the event is supported by SUSE, which is offering the venue, the hotels and some help with organization.

Check the report from last year to get an idea of what this event is about.

Sneak Peek openSUSE 13.1: What we have for Plasma Desktop Users

November 4th, 2013 by

Release Geeko Biting KDEA few days ago we featured a GNOME Sneak Peek and today it is time for the Blue camp! Whereas GNOME is still going through radical changes, KDE has been in incremental mode for quite a while, polishing their Plasma Desktop, Netbook interfaces and developing the new Plasma Active interface for touch devices. In this article we’ll introduce Plasma, providing a background to the choices behind Plasma and then review some of the major changes for this release. (more…)

Sneak Preview I: openSUSE 12.3 for Desktop Users

March 6th, 2013 by

release counterIn less than two weeks, openSUSE 12.3 will be on your doorstep. Or rather, on the mirrors, ready for use. If you are curious to know what is coming, this first sneak preview is for you! We’ll talk about what’s new on the desktop: GNOME, KDE, XFCE and Enlightenment as well as the applications. Enjoy! (more…)

Sneak Peek: GNOME in openSUSE 12.2

September 4th, 2012 by

openSUSE 12.2 is the second openSUSE release to include GNOME 3. GNOME 3.4 continues the rapid pace of evolution and consolidation set by GNOME 3.2 on openSUSE 12.1. This article is a sneak peek of what will be released tomorrow, the 5th of September!

(more…)

Sneak Peek: openSUSE 12.2 and KDE

September 4th, 2012 by

openSUSE comes with the 4.8 series of the KDE workspaces, applications and platform. This release, as you can read in the announcements is mostly focused on improving the user experience.

Starting up

booting opensuse_small Booting up openSUSE, you notice the nice new splash screen as well as the short boot times, courtesy of Plymouth and an improved systemd. But you’ll notice speed everywhere: this openSUSE release ships with Linux 3.4.6, a kernel release with a nice number of improvements to the storage layer. Moreover, openSUSE is build with GCC 4.7 and glibc 2.15, bringing speedups all over the system. You’ll notice this especially in the performance of low-level tools like the command line and GUI versions of zypper, our package manager. Especially relevant for the desktop is the inclusion of Qt 4.8.1 which makes your applications noticeably more responsive. The version of KWin part of KDE 4.8 comes with its own share of optimizations, with much more efficient painting. In short, boot up in openSUSE 12.2 and feel the speed! (more…)

openSUSE in Fosscomm 2012

May 22nd, 2012 by

Once again, the Greek openSUSE community was present and rocked in the Free open source software communities meeting, which took place this year in the beautiful town of Serres. We had 5 talks and 1 workshop.

  • The openSUSE Project-talk (Kostas Koudaras)
  • Yast-talk (Kostas Koudaras-Stathis Agrapidis)
  • openSUSE Medical-talk (Stathis Iosifidis)
  • OwnCloud-talk (Stathis Iosifidis but originally registered from Chris Loukas)
  • OBS-workshop (Stathis Agrapidis)
  • Gnome Extensions-talk (Stathis Iosifidis)
  • Animal Shelter Manager-talk (Stathis Iosifidis) (more…)

GNOME Accessibility Hackfest (interview)

February 7th, 2012 by

A few weeks ago in A Coruña, Spain a Hackfest around GNOME Accessibility took place hosted by Igalia . openSUSE found the opportunity to make some questions to the people involved and then learn a bit more about this interesting Project. Our interviewers were Alejandro Piñeiro Iglesias, Joanmarie Diggs and Juanjo Marín.

 

1 – What is ATK and AT-SPI in simple words?

AT-SPI is the acronym for Assistive Technology Service Provider Interface. Its main purpose is to provide a means for an assistive technology to interact with an application. For instance, the Orca screen reader wants to present newly-inserted text, such as a new instant message, to the user. Therefore Orca asks AT-SPI to inform it whenever text gets inserted. When Orca is told what text has just been inserted, it can present that new text to the user in speech and in braille. Similarly, Orca presents each newly-focused object to the user as the user navigates via the keyboard. Orca can do this because AT-SPI tells it each time a new object gains focus.

(more…)