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openSUSE ARM Gets new Raspberry Pi Images

September 9th, 2013 by
Raspberry Pi in action

Sadly, the sticker doesn’t fit…

Over the weekend, Bernhard Wiedemann has been working on new armv6 based images for the Raspberry Pi. It is built using a set of alternative build scripts aiming to make the building of the image easier. He’s put the scripts as well as an image online, you can get it from oSC or here (image) and here (scripts). If you’re playing around with Raspberry Pi and want to create images for your device(s), this is for you!

The Image and Building It

As Bernhard explains on his blog, the image he created is only 82mb compressed, so it is pretty minimalistic. The image also contains the scripts he created for building under /home/abuild/rpmbuild/SOURCES/.

If you’re interested in playing with the building itself, creating custom images, the following commands will get you going:
osc co devel:ARM:Factory:Contrib:RaspberryPi altimagebuild
cd devel:ARM:Factory:Contrib:RaspberryPi/altimagebuild
bash -x main.sh

He notes: If you have 6GB RAM, you can speed things up with export OSC_BUILD_ROOT=/dev/shm/arm before you do.

This package doesn’t build in OBS or with just the osc command as it requires root permissions for some steps. That is why you have to run it by hand and let it do its magic. The under-250-lines of script will go through the following steps:

  1. First, osc build is used to pull in required packages and setup the armv6 rootfs.
  2. Second, mkrootfs.sh modifies a copy of the rootfs under .root to contain all required configs
  3. And finally, mkimage.sh takes the .root dir and creates a .img from it that can be booted

Bernhard claims that: “this can build an image from scatch in three minutes. And my Raspberry Pi booted successfully with it within 55 seconds.

Todo and Open Issues

He also points out some remaining open issues:

  • the repo key is initially untrusted
  • still uses old 3.1 kernel
  • build scripts have no error handling

Compared to the old image, this one has some advantages:

  • It is easier to resize as the root partition is the last one
  • Compressed image is much smaller
  • Reproducible image build, so easy to customize
  • It is armv6 with floating point support, so could be faster
  • We have 5200 successfully built packages from openSUSE:Factory:ARM

If you wanted to play with building images for the Raspberry Pi, this might well be the easiest way doing so! And as always, merge requests are very much welcome.

Have a lot of fun

Winter is Coming, Get Your Code Inside!

September 5th, 2013 by

WinterIsComingFinal

    It is already September! Haven’t you noticed? Bad weather is coming, it will be freezing soon!

According to the roadmap, Full Feature Freeze will be upon openSUSE Factory on September the 19th. On that day, openSUSE 13.1 Beta will see the harsh light of day.

But already, the Toolchain and Base System are deeply frozen and only leaf packages have time left to scurry in. Two weeks, to be exact, 14 days and it will be Winter in Factory. Time to get your package updates in before they freeze in the cold! Read on to learn how to make it happen. (more…)

Help Wanted: openSUSE Review Team

August 28th, 2013 by

Package review image

The openSUSE Review Team is interested in adding 1 to 2 new members to the team.  This person will review submissions to opnSUSE Factory that will improve the quality of the product and add great new functionality to the already awesome openSUSE distribution.  Details of the tasks performed by the members of the Review Team can be seen on the openSUSE Review Team wiki page and the associated openSUSE Factory Submissions portal.

Ideally we want to add a non-SUSE employee from the community, but all qualified candidates will be considered.  (Dominique “Dimstar” Leuenberger would really appreciate some more non-SUSE folks on the team.  Who can blame him?!)

A qualified candidate would display the following characteristics:

a) works well with the Review Team and the openSUSE (and greater Linux) community
b) considerable expertise with RPM packaging
c) considerable expertise with openSUSE packaging methods and standards
d) reasonable awareness of Linux security concerns
e) an appreciation for quality controls and the value of solid, quality software
f) an availability to routinely perform these tasks for the community.  Typically a few hours per week divided over several days during the week.
g) willing to apply the rules to everybody; primary goal is to safeguard quality, not friendship :)    You’re even allowed to decline coolo’s request!

Applications will be considered until 9 September 2013.

If you’re interested, please send email to the Review Team via review@opensuse.org.  In your email, tell a little about yourself, particularly about the “a” through “g” qualifications listed above.

Oh, and don’t forget to have fun.

Upcoming openSUSE 13.1 will be kept Evergreen

August 26th, 2013 by

logo evergreen
The openSUSE Evergreen has just announced that the upcoming openSUSE 13.1 will be the next Evergreen release. This means that the Evergreen team will continue to provide openSUSE 13.1 with with security updates and important bugfixes after the usual 18 month maintenance cycle until it has had a total life time of at least three years.

What is Evergreen?

The openSUSE Evergreen team was started to keep openSUSE releases alive by issuing security and stability fixes after the regular 18-month lifespan of openSUSE releases. The team has kept selected releases maintained for an additional 18 to 30 months. The first Evergreen release was openSUSE 11.1. Current releases in the Evergreen maintenance program are openSUSE 11.2 to be maintained until November 2013 (a total of 4 years) and 11.4 to be maintained until July 2014 (reaching almost three-and-a-half).

You can find more information about Evergreen and how to keep your openSUSE release alive on the Evergreen wiki page.

Have a lot of fun!

openSUSE Milestone 4

August 12th, 2013 by

128px-Icon-yast
openSUSE Milestone 4, and final Milestone before starting the Beta process, is out for everyone to test. The process has worked out normally and although this Milestone came a few hours after it was planned, the process remains steady. openSUSE 13.1 is expected to be released in November of 2013 just in time for our second annual openSUSE Summit. The summit will provide an excellent opportunity for you to meet the people who took your contributions and made them part of the final openSUSE product. There will be plenty to talk about and it is also a good opportunity for you to present on what your worked on for 13.1. Do not miss the fun! (more…)

openSUSE 12.1 EOL, 13.1 Milestone 2 released!

June 11th, 2013 by

12_1vs13_1For those of you waiting for (or working on) openSUSE 13.1, we have good news: milestone 2 is now out for you to download. As to be exptected, the inclusion of newer software versions is the highlight of this release. Broken in M1 and fixed now are automake, boost, and webyast. But first, let’s talk openSUSE 12.1: it is no longer maintained. (more…)

openSUSE Kicks Off Development with Milestone 1

May 17th, 2013 by

13.1-Milestone1
openSUSE is pleased to announce that the newest Milestone for the upcoming version of openSUSE 13.1. is available for testing. As early version, it is expected that this Milestone is not fully functional or very stable and we welcome bug reports and fixes for the issues. This is the first in a series of upcoming updates to the distribution that will end with the final release of 13.1 projected by November of 2013. As usual with an alpha release, the most prominent changes in openSUSE 13.1 Milestone 1 come from the upgrades that packages are going through.

Major updates

Some major updates below:

  • GNOME 3.6 > 3.8.1
  • apache2 2.2.22 > 2.4.3
  • digikam 3.0.0 > 3.1.0
  • giflib 4.1.6 > 5.0.3
  • icecream 0.9.7 > 1.0.0
  • kernel 3.7.10 > 3.9.0
  • libreoffice 3.6.3.2.4 > 4.0.2.2.1
  • ocaml 3.12.1 > 4.00.1
  • qemu 1.3.0 > 1.4.0
  • qt-creator 2.6.2 > 2.7.0
  • ruby 1.9.3 > 2.0
  • systemd 195 > 202
  • wpa_supplicant 1.1 > 2.0
  • xorg-x11-server 1.13.2 > 1.14.1

Most Annoying Bugs

The list of most annoying bugs is still short. We’re looking towards you to help us make that list bigger! We need to find out what’s wrong so we can fix it. You can report bugs with this link. The process of reporting bugs involves a couple of steps that you can take in order to contribute with the distribution. Reporting bugs and problems with the packages is essential for openSUSE to retain its stability. Please review our sections on how to contribute to factory, and submitting bug reports.

You’re more than welcome to organize some bug-finding-and-squashing sessions! Take a look at previous efforts in our last beta-pizza-party!

Planned Changes

Some time ago, the team posted a suggested list of changes for openSUSE 13.1. The idea behind this is to accept the changes provided by the community and at the same time meet specific team goals. Please keep in mind that this list is subject to change but it helps when understanding where the next release of openSUSE would like to go.

For the base system, planned changes include updating GCC to version 4.8 and working on the latest integrations for the Linux Kernel. On booting there was a discussion looking to completely move to SYSTEMD and dropping SYSVINIT. Replacing MKINITRD with Dracut.

On the KDE environment the planned list includes making PHONON support GSTREAMER 1.0 and replacing Kopete, largely unmaintained now, to KDE Telepathy. Gnome is also looking to change a few things in 13.1 starting by adding Gnome 3.10, cleaning out some outdated libraries and changing its default theme to a greener one.

On security the list is simple so far, AppArmor will be promoted further as a preferred security suite and updating SELinux.

Get involved!

This list of possible changes can also be altered by your participation. If you are a developer looking to learn and participate of the openSUSE project through coding, packaging or coordinating efforts to include certain software on the distribution, go to our factory page and learn more about how to contribute code. The process of working packages into the factory release is also documented in an article for the release of openSUSE 12.3. If you are interested in making contributions for packages, please go here and get packaging! Although the link is for 12.3, keep in mind that the packaging process done on 13.1 is the same. If your are familiar with branching projects through GIT, making contributions to the factory development should be easy for you. In simple words, you access the openSUSE repository, branch the specific part you would like to work on, make the appropriate updates and then you make requests to our team to include your changes.

However, the work on openSUSE is not only belonging or limited to packaging. There is far more that can be done here. Marketing, team coordination, translation, artwork, etc. These are simple examples of what more of you could be doing for the team. If you are willing to participate, take a look at this page and choose!

Schedule

Master Coolo published a simple road map. The next milestone is expected for 6 of June, 2013. the next milestones come with about a month in between, Beta 1 is planned for the 19th of September, RC one will be on October 10 and RC2 on October 31st.

Announcing the release of openSUSE Edu Li-f-e 12.3-1

May 8th, 2013 by

openSUSE Education Team is proud to present Li-f-e (Linux for Education) 12.3-1. This first release is based on openSUSE 12.3 with all the official updates applied. Li-f-e incorporates the latest stable versions of all popular desktop environments such as KDE, Gnome and Cinnamon. It includes wide range of software catering to everyone’s needs from the openSUSE Education repository, multimedia from the Packman repository, development tools, and KIWI-LTSP -that allows normal PCs or diskless thin clients to network boot from a server running Li-f-e and lot more. Everything you need to make your computer useful is available right out of the box as soon as Li-f-e is installed on it.

Get it from here:Direct Download | Torrents | Metalinks | md5sum

Since this edition is based on openSUSE 12.3, all the official 12.3 updates, repositories from build service and Packman can be used to install additional software and keep it udpated.

Minimum hardware requirement are 1GB of RAM and 15GB free disk space. Installation from a USB stick will take about 40 minutes to complete depending on hardware capabilities. From a DVD it takes much longer. Check this howto for creating live USB stick on vfat partition or other GUI and terminal ways.

Here is the sample of some of the software available on the iso. A complete list of packages with version numbers is listed here.

This time, we also have an openSUSE Edu Li-f-e 12.3 64bit version in SUSE Studio – if you want to give it a try, download the ISO image or log in and run the image via “Testdrive” in your local browser! (Please note that 64bit edition has not been through a rigorous QA.)

Test reports are always welcomed – if you encounter any problems, feel free to contact us via any way mentioned in our wiki or write a bug report.

Have a lot of fun!

Your openSUSE Education Team

About ARMv7 progress and ARMing for AArch64

April 15th, 2013 by

openSUSE 12.3 introduced the 32bit ARMv7 architecture as new, fully supported architecture and brought experimental 64bit ARM (AArch64) images. Since the release, support for new hardware was added and more build power brought to the Open Build Service. And as far as we can tell, we now have the first large scale KVM deployment on ARM! We also introduce support for the Calxeda Highbank ARM server SoC, a major step forward for both ARM and openSUSE. Read on for details on where the openSUSE ARMy is going. (more…)

openSUSE for new geekos

March 22nd, 2013 by

get it logo
It is almost weekend and you want to try another Linux distribution? We’ve got you covered!

The Linux ecosystem is a varied one with hundreds of distributions, each having their unique set of abilities and limitations. Some compile the source on your system, others let you choose between init systems, try to be as small as possible, experiment with security solutions and more. There is also variation in governance: some are strongly top-down organized, others decide in a meritocratic way or vote. Some have strong corporate sponsor pushing decisions – others don’t. Some care to collaborate, others don’t value the wider ecosystem much and go their own way.

The variety in solutions shows people want different things and the different distributions provide that. But people change, so do their needs. And so, for those looking for Greener pastures, we wrote this articles with an overview of ‘the openSUSE way’ and the major differences between our tools and those from other major distributions. (more…)