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Where is my 12.2, my Kingdom for a 12.2!

June 14th, 2012 by

Failed geeko
Many people have noticed that the milestones and the Beta for this openSUSE release have been delayed or even canceled like Milestone 4. Now the RC is planned to go out Thursday – but that seems unlikely to happen as Factory, our development project, is still far too unstable. Coolo has send a mail to the openSUSE Factory mailing list noting that we need to re-think how we’re working.

We need new ideas

The mail by Coolo serves as a wakeup-call for openSUSE. Right now, we work via the devel projects which collaboratively send in better packages to Factory. But even then, sometimes things break in major ways and this breakage has gotten more frequent over time due to the growth of our community. One solution for this is to make heavier usage of ‘staging projects’ where packages get deeper testing and more integration can be done before moving to Factory. Another direction we could take is building more on our strengths like OBS and Tumbleweed. Slowing our release cycle to produce more stable releases say once a year, while increasing the emphasis on and efforts put in Tumbleweed and our OBS repo’s with newer software could give both ‘bleeding edge’ fans and those depending on a stable openSUSE more of what they want. Or, we go and loosen our release schedule, bringing out openSUSE ‘when it is ready’.

All options have pro’s and con’s. We want to avoid loosing ourselves: introducing rules and procedures to solve problems isn’t our way. So, we need fresh ideas and look in other directions. And now is the time to discuss these things: we’re bumping into the limits of how we work so the sense of urgency is there! (more…)

GoGo on openSUSE

April 16th, 2012 by


openSUSE 12.1 was one of the first major Linux distributions to include the new programming language Go. Recently, go 1.0 was released and shortly before milestone 3 openSUSE Factory received packages for this new Go. Graham Anderson notified the factory mailing list of this and included some tips for Go hackers on getting started with Go. Read on for some of his tips and links to more. (more…)

Using BTRFS on openSUSE 12.1

January 23rd, 2012 by

This article is contributed by Kamila Součkova

Introduction

As the btrfs wiki says: “Btrfs is a new copy on write filesystem for Linux aimed at implementing advanced features while focusing on fault tolerance, repair and easy administration.” Although under heavy development, it has become stable enough for personal use, and there are plenty of reasons to try it. What distinguishes it from earlier filesystems is that it has been designed with scalability and robustness in mind: it can handle huge files (up to 16EiB — a lot!), it can pack lots of files and directories efficiently, has built-in error detection methods (checksums of data and metadata), support for transparent compression, integrated multiple devices support (RAID-0, RAID-1 and RAID-10 so far) and more — see here for a more complete list.

In this how-to I will focus on one particularly neat feature: snapshots. Btrfs allows you to make read-only or writable snapshots of the state of your filesystem without wasting space with redundant data. Together with YaST’s Snapper module, this makes tracking FS changes and undoing undesired modifications a breeze.

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systemd – boot faster and cleaner with openSUSE 12.1

December 22nd, 2011 by

openSUSE 12.1 features systemd as a replacement for the System V init daemon. systemd provides a new and improved way of booting up your system and managing services. It comes with many new features like socket and dbus-activation, use of cgroups (control groups) and aggressive parallelization capabilities which leads to a faster boot-up of the system. Systemd also introduces a number of new features and tools for sysadmins. This article will explain what systemd does, how it does it and how to take advantage of the new possibilities it offers.
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openSUSE and ownCloud

December 20th, 2011 by

ownCloud logo

openSUSE 12.1 has been released a few weeks ago. A major new technology we introduce in this release is ownCloud, which we ship in a separate repository. ownCloud is a web application which lets you set up your own cloud – a place for you data where you can share it with others or use it over multiple devices. As YOU will own the data, it’s great from a privacy and security point of view.

However, setting up ownCloud, while not particularly complicated, is still vastly more difficult than navigating to a website which offers you convenient ways of giving them your personal data. If the convenience offered by companies like Dropbox, Canonical or Facebook is so much greater than what is offered by technologies which protect your freedom, you don’t really have a choice as common user.

openSUSE 12.1 offers a solution: mirall. While this tool has not yet solved all problems in the world, it makes deploying your ownCloud as easy as a few clicks and makes your files available for you off-line (a feature ownCloud itself lacks). Read on to learn what mirall has in store for openSUSE users!
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Systemd is being removed from Tumbleweed

September 20th, 2011 by

Respecting users is a priority to the openSUSE Project so when something does not work the way it should be, taking a step back is more preferable than delivering something that is not ready yet. For that reason yesterday afternoon Greg K.H. announced to the openSUSE-factory mailing list that systemd is being removed from Tumbleweed so that users won’t have a problem with it. That way it will allow developers to spend more time on working on it in order to have systemd ready for the upcoming 12.1 instead of chasing problems that are specific to Tumbleweed.

Here is the e-mail from Greg K.H. announcing the removal of systemd from Tumbleweed:

Due to a number of inter dependencies on packages that are not ready for
Tumbleweed, and other interactions with the system that are causing
problems for some users, I’m going to remove systemd from Tumbleweed
today to allow the developers to spend more time on getting it stable
for Factory and 12.1 instead of having to chase down problems that are
specific to Tumbleweed only.

So if you have installed systemd in Tumbleweed, I suggest you now remove
it with a simple:
zypper rm systemd

thanks,

greg k-h

openSUSE and online storage and syncing

June 17th, 2011 by
Clouds

The ‘cloud’ has been a buzzword for quite a while. While some are still rather cynical towards the concept, products like mobile phones with Android have shown the value of putting your data in that huge, amorphous network of servers somewhere. Apple recently introduced their new cloud service and Microsoft has their cloud too. So with the other major players talking cloudy, what does Linux have?

Variety

Let’s define Cloud technology as ‘related to putting data online & sharing among devices’ which is a reasonable definition for our purposes. There is a huge number of technologies connecting openSUSE users to online services. However there is a distinction to be made between commercial or proprietary operating systems and ours. We don’t create a vendor lock-in scenario because we focus on tools that freely connect you to your choice of publicly available services. This is a key distinction because we’re not owning or controlling the cloud that you place your data in. You, the user, get to decide the place where it best fits your needs and comfort level. Yesterday we highlighted integration in our every day applications. Today we focus on file syncing services and especially the cool Free Software project ownCloud! (more…)

openSUSE and online services

June 16th, 2011 by
Clouds

The ‘cloud’ has been a buzzword for quite a while. While some are still rather cynical towards the concept, products like mobile phones with Android have shown the value of putting your data in that huge, amorphous network of servers somewhere. Apple recently introduced their new cloud service and Microsoft has their cloud too. So with the other major players talking cloudy, what does Linux have?

Variety

Let’s define Cloud technology as ‘related to putting data online & sharing among devices’ which is a reasonable definition for our purposes. There is a huge number of technologies connecting openSUSE users to online services. However there is a distinction to be made between commercial or proprietary operating systems and ours. We don’t create a vendor lock-in scenario because we focus on tools that freely connect you to your choice of publicly available services. This is a key distinction because we’re not owning or controlling the cloud that you place your data in. You, the user, get to decide the place where it best fits your needs and comfort level. Today and tomorrow we will highlight some of them here, starting with integration in our every day applications. (more…)

GNOME 3.0 arrives for openSUSE 11.4

April 23rd, 2011 by

The wait is finally over and the much anticipated release of GNOME 3 on openSUSE’s latest distro release, 11.4 is ready for download at a desktop near you.  Frederic Crozat, a member of the openSUSE GNOME Team, has been working tirelessly, burning the midnight oil getting GNOME3 stable enough for you all to use.  See his blog for the full details. Our friends from GNOME Foundation also welcomed GNOME 3 for openSUSE with a welcome tweet.
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First Bretzn Sprint: openSUSE App Store on the Horizon

January 27th, 2011 by

Participants in the Bretzn SprintNovell hosted the first Bretzn Sprint in the SUSE office in Nürnberg between 21th and the 23st of January. The objective of the sprint was to create an proof of concept application store for openSUSE.

This meeting is a direct follow up of the Cross-distribution meeting on application installer which took place in the 3 days leading up to the Bretzn sprint. During this meeting developers from Debian, Fedora, Mageia, openSUSE, and Ubuntu Linux distributions decided to work together on common APIs and code for application stores on Linux.

The Bretzn Sprint was dedicated to the development of a proof of concept of this idea, using existing components like the MeeGo Garage client and libattica as starting points.

Attendees of this meeting where Will Stephenson, Dan Leinir Turthra Jensen, Frederik Gladhorn, Mateu Batle Sastre, Eugene Trounev, Vincent Untz, Pavol Rusnak and Frank Karlitschek. This team brought together a wide range of skills, as can be seen in the results of this highly productive sprint.

openSUSE App Store screenshotIn just two and a half days, they managed to create a working application store client for openSUSE and KDE. The server part was based on OCS (Open Collaboration Services), which already did everything needed for the server side and just needed some data inserted to be shown in the client. The client in turn was created by using the MeeGo Garage client, and adapting it to be a more KDE-like application, by using the various KDE widgets and other tools, removing the duplication of functionality which was covered by the KDE libraries.

Finally, a new application view was created, to replace the existing which was never as pleasing as the original authors wanted it to be. This was done by using Qt Quick, which has allowed for the rapid construction of a much more pleasant look. The new interface is the result of a brainstorming session involving all members of the sprint, based on the results from thecross-distribution meeting. While this work is still in progress, it already represents an improvement over the old interface.

Article contributed by Frank Karlitschek