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SUSE Speeds up Building AArch64 Software in QEMU

October 1st, 2013 by

ARM AArch64 logo
Following the announcement of much improved Raspberry Pi support, there is more news coming from the openSUSE ARM team! The SUSE team has been developing an AArch64 port of QEMU which is much faster building 64 bit ARM code in emulation and this code is aimed for upstream inclusion. Read on to find out what this is all about. (more…)

openSUSE ARM Gets new Raspberry Pi Images

September 9th, 2013 by
Raspberry Pi in action

Sadly, the sticker doesn’t fit…

Over the weekend, Bernhard Wiedemann has been working on new armv6 based images for the Raspberry Pi. It is built using a set of alternative build scripts aiming to make the building of the image easier. He’s put the scripts as well as an image online, you can get it from oSC or here (image) and here (scripts). If you’re playing around with Raspberry Pi and want to create images for your device(s), this is for you!

The Image and Building It

As Bernhard explains on his blog, the image he created is only 82mb compressed, so it is pretty minimalistic. The image also contains the scripts he created for building under /home/abuild/rpmbuild/SOURCES/.

If you’re interested in playing with the building itself, creating custom images, the following commands will get you going:
osc co devel:ARM:Factory:Contrib:RaspberryPi altimagebuild
cd devel:ARM:Factory:Contrib:RaspberryPi/altimagebuild
bash -x main.sh

He notes: If you have 6GB RAM, you can speed things up with export OSC_BUILD_ROOT=/dev/shm/arm before you do.

This package doesn’t build in OBS or with just the osc command as it requires root permissions for some steps. That is why you have to run it by hand and let it do its magic. The under-250-lines of script will go through the following steps:

  1. First, osc build is used to pull in required packages and setup the armv6 rootfs.
  2. Second, mkrootfs.sh modifies a copy of the rootfs under .root to contain all required configs
  3. And finally, mkimage.sh takes the .root dir and creates a .img from it that can be booted

Bernhard claims that: “this can build an image from scatch in three minutes. And my Raspberry Pi booted successfully with it within 55 seconds.

Todo and Open Issues

He also points out some remaining open issues:

  • the repo key is initially untrusted
  • still uses old 3.1 kernel
  • build scripts have no error handling

Compared to the old image, this one has some advantages:

  • It is easier to resize as the root partition is the last one
  • Compressed image is much smaller
  • Reproducible image build, so easy to customize
  • It is armv6 with floating point support, so could be faster
  • We have 5200 successfully built packages from openSUSE:Factory:ARM

If you wanted to play with building images for the Raspberry Pi, this might well be the easiest way doing so! And as always, merge requests are very much welcome.

Have a lot of fun

Help Wanted: openSUSE Review Team

August 28th, 2013 by

Package review image

The openSUSE Review Team is interested in adding 1 to 2 new members to the team.  This person will review submissions to opnSUSE Factory that will improve the quality of the product and add great new functionality to the already awesome openSUSE distribution.  Details of the tasks performed by the members of the Review Team can be seen on the openSUSE Review Team wiki page and the associated openSUSE Factory Submissions portal.

Ideally we want to add a non-SUSE employee from the community, but all qualified candidates will be considered.  (Dominique “Dimstar” Leuenberger would really appreciate some more non-SUSE folks on the team.  Who can blame him?!)

A qualified candidate would display the following characteristics:

a) works well with the Review Team and the openSUSE (and greater Linux) community
b) considerable expertise with RPM packaging
c) considerable expertise with openSUSE packaging methods and standards
d) reasonable awareness of Linux security concerns
e) an appreciation for quality controls and the value of solid, quality software
f) an availability to routinely perform these tasks for the community.  Typically a few hours per week divided over several days during the week.
g) willing to apply the rules to everybody; primary goal is to safeguard quality, not friendship :)    You’re even allowed to decline coolo’s request!

Applications will be considered until 9 September 2013.

If you’re interested, please send email to the Review Team via review@opensuse.org.  In your email, tell a little about yourself, particularly about the “a” through “g” qualifications listed above.

Oh, and don’t forget to have fun.

Server outages the coming days

May 18th, 2013 by

Failed geekoBelieve it or not: a car crashed into the Nuremberg SUSE office building. Our geekos are fine but the power will have to be shut down so repairs can take place. You can expect some availability issues for our servers the coming days. Hopefully things will be back up next week!

oSC 2013 Travel Support Requests Period Open

May 3rd, 2013 by

ChameleonBustPosterDraft

Today the openSUSE Travel Support Team opened the Travel Support Request Submission tool for requests related to the openSUSE Conference 2013 in Thessaloniki. The goal is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to come to the openSUSE Conference! You don’t have to be one of the top 10 packagers to apply – if you’re translating, building a local community or helping out at the forums, we might still be able to offer you support, so apply!

When and how

The application period will be a little over week, starting on May 2nd and closing on May 10th. For the very first time, all requests will be managed through our brand new application that is be available at connect.opensuse.org/travel-support.

You will need an openSUSE Connect account in order to log in the application and apply for sponsorship.

A few reminders

  • Please, read the Travel Support wiki page carefully before you apply.
  • We want everybody to be there! Even if you think you would not qualify for travel support, just submit a request! If you don’t ask we can’t help you!
  • The Travel Committee can reimburse up to 80% of travel and lodging costs. That includes plane ticket, train and bus tickets (no taxi), even car gas on some occasions, and hotel or hostel costs. Food and all local expenses are on you!
  • The Travel Team won’t be able to book or pay anything in advance, reimbursement comes after the event is over, based on receipts you keep of your expenses.
  • Again: no receipts = no money – it’s the rules!Click to submit a paper!
  • Those sponsored by the Travel Team have to write a blog or report on the event and are expected to be available for helping with tasks at the event where needed!
  • Sponsorship decisions are influenced by the openSUSE history of the requester. Your involvement with openSUSE is really relevant!
  • Having an abstract submitted for presentation at the conference is relevant as well. Note that the CfP is extended so there is still time!
  • If you got support before and complied with all the requirements, this gets you bonus points too.
  • The amount requested must be detailed according to your request, like the airport you will be departing from, sharing hotel/hostel rooms, costs associated with your trip.
  • Try to get the best fares for tickets and lodging. Remember if approved at least 20% (and sometimes more) will be paid by you.

Hurry up!

Our goal is to support as many people as possible. If you need support to make it to the event, PLEASE SEND IN A REQUEST! We will attempt to send the approvals before May 13th, 2013 so you can start booking. Book quickly, as we don’t cover anything over the previously agreed amount so higher prices are on you!

The conference is getting close and the deadline for travel support is tight so start searching for flights right now! Set up your openSUSE Connect account and send in a request as soon as possible!

We hope to see you there.

Your openSUSE Travel Support Team

Open Build Service version 2.4 released

April 30th, 2013 by

obs-logo

Over at openbuildservice.org they have released the Open Build Service (OBS) version 2.4 which supports yet another package format (Arch’s PKGBUILD), secure boot signing, appstream metadata, introduces a new constraint system and makes everything a lot snappier. Go check out their release announcement to learn all the nitty gritty details of OBS 2.4.

On the OBS reference server, build.opensuse.org, which we use to build our most awesome GNU/Linux distribution we have followed the road to this release since early January and of course the final 2.4 release is already deployed there. We are very happy that the openSUSE community was able to help make this a rock solid OBS release with a lot of great features and we congratulate the OBS team on this new version.

„It is exciting to see the Open Build Service team move forward with such a great feature release. OBS forms the base of the collaborative model which makes openSUSE such a successful distribution and we are proud to work with them and their sweet technology.”

– said openSUSE Community Manager Jos Poortvliet.

New OBS Version, new OBS power

And by the way, last Tuesday the truck with the new compute rack came and we were able to move it into the openSUSE sever room in the SUSE offices. After our amazing admins set up power and network, which we had to expand for all these nodes, the OBS team deployed the shiny new appliance image based on openSUSE 12.3. The workers immediately started to build jobs and after some minor glitches with the bios and network time setup, all the workers are now in production mode.

We already configured some of the build hosts to have less workers on them so the individual workers have more RAM for bigger build jobs and we’re thinking about making some of them build only in RAM for smaller build jobs. More optimization might follow, but even without that you’ll notice building on OBS will once again be as quick as a bunny!

– check out more pictures of OBS hardware in the Google+ group

„The server monitor is telling the awful truth: now that we have the build power we have to work on the other hardware bottlenecks, like the server delivering binaries across the build hosts and to our mirrors pronto!”

– said openSUSE Release Manager Stephan “coolo” Kulow.

So don’t forget that you can make a difference with your support and sponsorship for the openSUSE and OBS communities. If you happen be able to, or know someone who can, donate serious I/O power to the Open Build Service reference server – it’s time to tell us!

Go Check It Out!

See all the awesomeness of this new release. Either download the appliance and run your own instance or head over to the reference server to get your taste of OBS 2.4. And don’t forget to let us know how it goes on twitter, G+, facebook or simply in the comment section below. We’re looking forward to hear from you!

OBS Gaining More Power

April 23rd, 2013 by

Linux Power logoIn the last weeks, the Open Build Service has received support from several sponsors. SUSE brought in a new, powerful x86 compute rack, ARM support was beefed up with Samsung Arndale boards and today we are happy to announce that IBM has provided us with two IBM PowerLinux 7R2 servers to increase build capacity for its Power platform! (more…)

About ARMv7 progress and ARMing for AArch64

April 15th, 2013 by

openSUSE 12.3 introduced the 32bit ARMv7 architecture as new, fully supported architecture and brought experimental 64bit ARM (AArch64) images. Since the release, support for new hardware was added and more build power brought to the Open Build Service. And as far as we can tell, we now have the first large scale KVM deployment on ARM! We also introduce support for the Calxeda Highbank ARM server SoC, a major step forward for both ARM and openSUSE. Read on for details on where the openSUSE ARMy is going. (more…)

SUSE sponsors new hardware for the Open Build Service

April 8th, 2013 by

UTSmOKcQdU_bodybgOver the last year, the Open Build Service (OBS) reference server, a service to build and distribute packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way, has been flooded with new packages, new distributions and even entire new architectures, deluging its build servers with compilation jobs. But spring is coming: SUSE has has just sponsored a rack server with some serious compute power for us to speed up your compilations. OBS will kick into high gear again! (more…)

openSUSE for new geekos

March 22nd, 2013 by

get it logo
It is almost weekend and you want to try another Linux distribution? We’ve got you covered!

The Linux ecosystem is a varied one with hundreds of distributions, each having their unique set of abilities and limitations. Some compile the source on your system, others let you choose between init systems, try to be as small as possible, experiment with security solutions and more. There is also variation in governance: some are strongly top-down organized, others decide in a meritocratic way or vote. Some have strong corporate sponsor pushing decisions – others don’t. Some care to collaborate, others don’t value the wider ecosystem much and go their own way.

The variety in solutions shows people want different things and the different distributions provide that. But people change, so do their needs. And so, for those looking for Greener pastures, we wrote this articles with an overview of ‘the openSUSE way’ and the major differences between our tools and those from other major distributions. (more…)