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What Will openSUSE 13.2 Default Wallpaper Look Like?

May 22nd, 2014 by

Eppur si muove! Even though we sometimes feel there’s a sort of a standstill once first major bugs are fixed in a new release and it settles on our machine, that’s not the case by any viable metric. The openSUSE team works diligently on delivering a new release (openSUSE 13.2) ever since 13.1 was released, and among them, we find the artwork team, which is brainstorming the creation and subsequent selection of the new default wallpaper of the next openSUSE release (the awesome picture your desktop defaults to after installation).

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Spreading the Word on the Geeko – Support is Back!

May 21st, 2014 by

openSUSE Booth
Spreading the word about our project has again become a little bit easier. As announced during the Opening Keynote at oSC14 the reimbursement program for locally produced materials is BACK!

We would like to thank Jim Henderson, who will lead the team, Shawn Dunn, and Alexandros Vennos for volunteering their time to manage the requests. The program is funded with up to $200 US per event with a limit of $2000 US per quarter. The initiative is no limited to events as in small local conferences. If you need material for a local LUG meeting or if you can produce material for a “permanent” display of openSUSE in a University or other public place of interest use this program.

promoting openSUSE

How does it work?

The process is outlined in the wiki and will share the Travel Support Program application. Basically you will need to submit a request through the application prior to the time of need. The team will evaluate the information and get back to you in a reasonable amount of time. The team may also decide that it may be worth sending out a booth box instead of producing material locally. If you accept the booth box the request will be handled for you if booth boxes are available at the time. After you have approval you can go ahead and produce the material for the event/promotion campaign. Once the event is completed provide a report, blog post on lizards or your own blog for example and submit your receipts. That’s it. For permanent displays, the “event” is obviously “never” over, thus you’d just submit your receipt after you setup the display (hang up the posters), send along a picture and some advertisement, possibly on social media and that’s it.

We tried to keep things as simple as possible while still assuring that there’s some verifiable bang for the buck for our project. After all having posters hanging in someone’s basement does not hep us find more users or contributors.
Geeko's at the booth

What else?

A word on the booth boxes and larger events. A list of events where we would like to have people represent our project is in the works and will soon appear on the wiki. Booth boxes for those events have been set aside. Keep an eye out for an announcement about the events list and a call for advocates to represent the project. As a hint, OSCON is happening from July 20-24 in Portland Oregon and we have no one yet organizing a local team to show off openSUSE.

The local production reimbursement program is live and you can start using it today. As we are just starting out there are bound to be some rough edges, thus please be patient, provide as much feedback as possible about the process and the handling of things to allow everyone involved to improve the initiative for everyone that might want to take advantage of it.

Go and spread the word about openSUSE and Have a lot of fun…

Aufbruchstimmung…..Here is what you missed at oSC14

May 2nd, 2014 by

oSC14 took place in Dubrovnik, Croatia, attracting a large number of Geekos to give and attend talks, organize and attend workshops and have fun at the parties. Compared to previous conferences the attendance at oSC14 was unfortunately on the lighter side of things but never the less we all had a great time. Since oSC13 we certainly had our trials and tribulations which we have left behind us and the mood was extremely positive with everyone being ready to move forward. The many hallway discussions had people discussing the new booth boxes, the progress on openQA and the staging model for Factory development. We shared articles on the event already, had 13K viewers on Bambuser and here we try to provide a bit of a closing overview! (more…)

oSC 2014 3rd – 4th Day

April 28th, 2014 by

oSC14 Group photoGeekos gathered at beautiful Dubrovnik in Croatia for their annual meetup. They drunk, they conversed and they shared knowledge and progress of the project. They had fun! The openSUSE Conference’s final day and reporting is now detailed below. “The strength to change” was the moto of this conference and it served well its purpose. Many people found their strength and enthusiasm and started contributing to the project. We encourage you to participate. We welcome everyone interested in contributing to an awesome project. (more…)

oSC 2014 2nd Day

April 27th, 2014 by

This year’s openSUSE Conference is being held in the beautiful city of Dubrovnik in Croatia. This year’s conference organization team has taken care of its attendees with a special pass in order to have the chance to go sightseeing at the beautiful old city of Dubrovnik, to see the port and walk on the walls. But what happened at the venue today… (more…)

oSC 2014 1st Day

April 25th, 2014 by

The openSUSE Conference 2014 is being held in Dubrovnik, on the Dalmatian coast in Croatia. The conference venue, also known as the Campus of the University of Dubrovnik is set and ready to accommodate all the Geekos that will visit the conference from around the world. Everyone is happy and delighted about this conference.

Read more about this awesome first day!

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oSC has started – follow us remotely!

April 25th, 2014 by
board in Action by Svebor

The Board in Action

The openSUSE Conference 2014 in Dubrovnik was kicked off just an hour ago by the board, sharing some practical information with those in attendance, a call for help as well as a number of community announcements. Talks will be available via streaming during the event, make sure to check it out!

The board brought up the state of openSUSE, including the release cycle (what comes after 13.1 is not clear yet), the changes to our processes (staging projects, openQA testing integration) and so on. This conference is a great time and place to discuss these things.

Announcements

    • The openSUSE Conference 2015 will take place in The Hague, Netherlands!

Under leadership of Hans de Raadt, a local team will take care of us in the international city of peace and justice. More details on Sunday!

    • Reimbursement of production of local materials is back!

A process is being set up, led by a committee under Jim Henderson. More info will follow soon!

And the Board urged everybody to have fun and learn a lot!

Streaming

The sessions at the conference are streamed live. You can find the feeds on bambuser.

Practical

For those at the event: don’t forget to return the food card and pay so you get something to eat today, tomorrow and on Sunday!

And a reminder: the conference party on Sunday evening starts at 7:00 P.M. (19:00) at the EastWest Pub, which is located right at the beach at Frana Supila 4. The pub is just south of the old town and it takes about 15 to 20 minutes to walk there from the venue. On the way you will pass Sesame where everything starts on Thursday evening.

Make Room on the Runway: openSUSE Conference 2014 Program Ready

April 18th, 2014 by

Register now!We are happy to announce that at long last the schedule for oSC14 has landed and you can find the details of the once again jam packed conference here. We already published a extended sneak peek as well as information on the keynote by Michael Meeks. (more…)

News from your openSUSE admins

April 12th, 2014 by

Heartbleed and openSUSE infrastructureHeartbleed Logo

As people started to ask, we checked all openSUSE servers and can confirm that none of them is affected by the heartbleed bug.

For those users running openSUSE 12.2 and 13.1, we can just repeat what we always pray: please install the latest official updates provided by our glorious maintenance team.

RSYNC and rsync.opensuse.org

The server behind rsync.opensuse.org is re-installed now and already providing packages via HTTP again.

But we faced an issue with the automation that creates the content of the “hotstuff” rsync modules: normally a script analyzes the log files of download.opensuse.org and arranges the content of these special rsync modules to provide always the most requested files, so our users have a good chance to find a very close mirror for their packages. But currently the script is not producing what we expect: it empties all those hotstuff modules. As the core developer behind this script comes back from vacation on Monday, we hope he can quickly fix the problem. For now we disabled the “hotstuff” modules (means on rsync.opensuse.org: we disabled rsync completely for now) to avoid problems.

If you want to sync packages to your local machine(s) via rsync: please pick a mirror from our page at mirrors.opensuse.org providing public rsync.

New hardware

All the racks of the OBS reference server

All the racks of the OBS reference server

You may have noticed already that the openSUSE team installed a new version of openQA on the production server. An additional news item might be that this new version has seen also new hardware to run faster than ever.

But not only openQA, also the database cluster behind download.opensuse.org has seen a hardware upgrade. The new servers allow to run the database servers as virtual machines, able to have the whole database structure stored in RAM (you hopefully benefit from the faster response times on download.opensuse.org already). And the servers still have enough capacity left, so we can now also visualize the web servers providing the download.opensuse.org interface. We are currently thinking about the detailed setup of the new download.opensuse.org system (maybe using ha-proxy here again? maybe running mirrorbrain in the “no local storage” mode? …) – so this migration might take some more time, but we want to provide the best possible solution to you.

Admins on openSUSE Conference

These year, three of our main European openSUSE administrators are able to attend to the openSUSE Conference in Dubrovnik:Geekocamp

  • Markus Rückert
  • Martin Caj
  • Robert Wawrig

And they will not only participate: instead they are providing talks and help with the infrastructure and video recording of the venue. So whenever you see them: time to spend them a drink or two :-)

 

 

 

 

Bodega, app stores and the Open Build Service

April 3rd, 2014 by

Welcome to the Bodega store!

Bodega is a project making use of the Open Build Service. Aside from that, there are many other connections between the Bodega team and openSUSE – time to find out more! We spoke with Aaron Seigo, and discussed Bodega, Appstream, zypper, ymp and the beauty of Free Software.

What is Bodega?

First off, let’s find out what Bodega is all about. Aaron explains:

Bodega is a store for digital stuff. In fancy words: it creates a catalog of metadata which represents digital assets.

The most important thing is of course the ‘digital asset’ term. That can be anything. For example, applications. Applications can be self contained – think how android does its APK files. Of course, things on Linux are often more complicated. Apache isn’t exactly a self-contained thing. And look further – perl, php, ruby, they all have their own addons like gems that need managing. Generalizing further, there are manuals. And books in general. Music, movies, pictures, you can go on.


Setting up a Bodega account

Of course, the competition has these too – look at Apple or Google.

And how about Linux…

Linux does not have a store where you can get such a wide variety of things. For a game, you can use Appstream, get it from Apper or GNOME’s software center. They all give a view on applications. Unfortunately, that is only useful for desktops and can handle things barely above the level of Angry Birds. If you want a python module as developers – these fancy tools won’t help you. Nor are they useful on servers. For those you have to rely on command line tools or even do things completely by hand. And it is all different between distributions.

Going further, where do you get documentation? For openSUSE, that’s activedoc or the forums or our support database on the wiki. Not from zypper. Music – you can get that from Magnatune and so on.

What if you can have one place where you can get a book, game, applications, isn’t that nice? That is what Bodega is.


The main screen of the store

How is Bodega different?

So, Bodega offers a digital store which can handle a wider variety of things than our current solutions. But what sets it apart from proprietary technologies like the Playstore and of course Canonical’s store solution? Aaron:

Most Linux solutions like Appstream assume their audience are users who play Angry Birds and use spreadsheets. Fair enough. Bodega takes a different approach and is far more ambitious.

Bodega has all the meta data in one place and offers ‘stores’ which are views on that data. That means you can have a software developer store, for example listing all languages and their addons separate; and a server section etc. And a separate UI for the angry-bird-and-spreadsheet crowd. All from the same bodega system, filtered by tags (not static categories!).

Talking about Appstream, Bodega can of course benefit from the metadata gathered for Appstream. And GNOME’s Software Center could be reworked to be a front-end to Bodega, adding books, music and lots of other digital data to its store. This is not meant to be a rewrite of what is there, or an isolated effort!


An application in the store

And why would you build on Bodega?

Bodega is open: everybody can quite easily add their own stores; or their own data sources; and add content and even sell it through their channels. It is not a closed system, on the contrary.

Open is a must, especially for Linux:

Take the 440.000 users of openSUSE. That would be a minimal amount of sales… The top-10 of paid apps in ubuntu makes less than a $100 per month of sales. Not really worth the effort. But if we could aggregate the sales between distributions, it would become relevant for third-party developers. Bodega as a cross-distribution is important!

And Bodega is useful for people outside of Linux. You can have your store on your own website so it is realistically possible for a independent author to sell their books in a bodega instance on their own website and never even SEE Linux. Yet the openSUSE users can get the books and benefit from the larger ecosystem…

The beauty of it is that it is all Free and Open Source Software, front and back. You can self-host all you want.

How do Bodega and OBS relate?


Preview of a wallpaper

Bodega and openSUSE have something in common: the Open Build Service. Not only is OBS used by the Bodega developers and do they run openSUSE on their servers, Bodega supports ymp files!

Bodega is well integrated with the Open Build Service. If you create an app from OBS in Bodega, you just have to take the yaml file and fill in the missing details, adding screen shots for example. Bodega will not pull the package from OBS and store it somewhere. Instead it simply uses the one-click-install and when a user clicks on the install button, it sends the one-click-install file through. It thus does not interfere with updates, but it can show users that a new version is available and let them update from Bodega if they want.

Packagers still have to add their apps to the store but we could kickstart Bodega with the apps already shipped in openSUSE, using the Appstream metadata. Non-official repos can then be added and so on. It would be quite easy to import all of the openSUSE packages. Same with the and documentation and drivers (it can show “developer: nvidia” so users know to trust it). And if there is a new revision of the documentation, Bodega can take care of that, just like it handles software updates (through zypper of course).

This is where you can come in: the team is looking for help in this area and if you are interested in making this happen, come talk to the Bodega folks! You can find them on the active mailing list or the #plasma active channel on Freenode.

Done


Famous books included!

You might be eager to find out what is there, today. Well, if you’ve seen the screenshots to the side, you know there is an app to access the store. It is build for touch screens but works just fine and you can get it in openSUSE through software.opensuse.org. Once installed, you can fire it up typing “active-addons” in a run command dialog.

Shawn Dunn (of cloverleaf fame) is putting together a more traditional desktop UI, while maintaining these packages as well. You will be able to have a conversation with him as he’s going to be at the openSUSE Conference in Dubrovnik this month where he will present a session about Bodega! He is known as SFaulken online and pretty much always hangs in the #opensuse-kde channel on Freenode where you can ask how to get things running or how to help him break stuff anytime. He’s also yelling at the world on google plus.

Bodega now contains the entire book set of Project Gutenberg (thousands of awesome, free books) as well as a number of wallpapers and applications. Aaron:

There is work to be done to include all openSUSE Software in Bodega. The store can use a little work too, but is based on QML which makes it very easy to improve. If you’re interested in helping out, let us know!

You can contact Aaron on IRC as aseigo in the #plasma active channel on Freenode, ping him on Google+ or shoot him a mail on aseigo on the KDE.org servers.