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News from your openSUSE admins

April 12th, 2014 by

Heartbleed and openSUSE infrastructureHeartbleed Logo

As people started to ask, we checked all openSUSE servers and can confirm that none of them is affected by the heartbleed bug.

For those users running openSUSE 12.2 and 13.1, we can just repeat what we always pray: please install the latest official updates provided by our glorious maintenance team.

RSYNC and rsync.opensuse.org

The server behind rsync.opensuse.org is re-installed now and already providing packages via HTTP again.

But we faced an issue with the automation that creates the content of the “hotstuff” rsync modules: normally a script analyzes the log files of download.opensuse.org and arranges the content of these special rsync modules to provide always the most requested files, so our users have a good chance to find a very close mirror for their packages. But currently the script is not producing what we expect: it empties all those hotstuff modules. As the core developer behind this script comes back from vacation on Monday, we hope he can quickly fix the problem. For now we disabled the “hotstuff” modules (means on rsync.opensuse.org: we disabled rsync completely for now) to avoid problems.

If you want to sync packages to your local machine(s) via rsync: please pick a mirror from our page at mirrors.opensuse.org providing public rsync.

New hardware

All the racks of the OBS reference server

All the racks of the OBS reference server

You may have noticed already that the openSUSE team installed a new version of openQA on the production server. An additional news item might be that this new version has seen also new hardware to run faster than ever.

But not only openQA, also the database cluster behind download.opensuse.org has seen a hardware upgrade. The new servers allow to run the database servers as virtual machines, able to have the whole database structure stored in RAM (you hopefully benefit from the faster response times on download.opensuse.org already). And the servers still have enough capacity left, so we can now also visualize the web servers providing the download.opensuse.org interface. We are currently thinking about the detailed setup of the new download.opensuse.org system (maybe using ha-proxy here again? maybe running mirrorbrain in the “no local storage” mode? …) – so this migration might take some more time, but we want to provide the best possible solution to you.

Admins on openSUSE Conference

These year, three of our main European openSUSE administrators are able to attend to the openSUSE Conference in Dubrovnik:Geekocamp

  • Markus Rückert
  • Martin Caj
  • Robert Wawrig

And they will not only participate: instead they are providing talks and help with the infrastructure and video recording of the venue. So whenever you see them: time to spend them a drink or two :-)

 

 

 

 

FreeDesktop Summit about to start

March 27th, 2014 by

Next week, from Monday the 31st of March to the 4th of April, developers from the major Linux Desktops (GNOME, KDE, Unity and RazorQt) will meet again in Nuremberg for the second FreeDesktop Summit.

The summit is a joint technical meeting from developers working on ‘desktop infrastructure’ on the major Free Desktop projects and the event aims to improve collaboration between the projects by discussing specifications and the sharing of platform-level components.

Like last year, the event is supported by SUSE, which is offering the venue, the hotels and some help with organization.

Check the report from last year to get an idea of what this event is about.

SUSE Speeds up Building AArch64 Software in QEMU

October 1st, 2013 by

ARM AArch64 logo
Following the announcement of much improved Raspberry Pi support, there is more news coming from the openSUSE ARM team! The SUSE team has been developing an AArch64 port of QEMU which is much faster building 64 bit ARM code in emulation and this code is aimed for upstream inclusion. Read on to find out what this is all about. (more…)

The certification value and the LPIC 1 – SUSE Certified Linux Administrator connection

July 2nd, 2013 by

By derivative work: Wondigoma (Tux-gnu-dynamic-duo.jpg) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/), GFDL (www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or GPL (www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons
More than twenty years have passed since GNU/Linux was born, and more than twenty five since the GNU manifesto by Richard Stallman. Free Software has become widely used in the industry and has been successfully introduced in many Computer Science Department syllabi’s all over the globe. But the Bachelor degree achieved by studying Computer Science not the one of Linux Administrator or Free Software Programmer. While Free Software specific MSc programmes exist, scientific research with its focus on publication, study and review is rather different than the required skills of application of technical knowledge in the business world.

Meanwhile, Free Software communities, born from the ashes of late 80s hacker communities, had the character of social movement. They attracted people from various social, economic, science sectors. Many of them, realizing the potential of Linux and its momentum, created a new generation of university dropouts. But their skills, even if they had tremendous knowledge of computer systems and networks, were undocumented and hard to prove in a ‘HR department-compattible‘ way.
LPI logo

Introducing the Linux Professional Institute

These were the reasons creating the need of certification in GNU/Linux. In 1999, in the midst of dot com bubble and just eight years after the first Linux Kernel came out, the Linux Professional Institute was founded to fill this gap in Free Software and networking professionalism. The great adoption of the LAMP stack by web servers during the dot com run led to high demand for Linux technicians, no matter if they were graduated or not. But employers are always happy having someone with proven knowledge of her skills, if not for them, than to prove to their customers that they employ skilled workers.

Having the LPI as vendor-neutral GNU/Linux certification helped make this proof of knowledge widely available. No matter what distribution the corporate server room runs or what is available in on the desktops in the cubicles, the LPI Certified professional is always capable of offering a solution fitting to the requirements.
Geeko cleans up the library.

LPI collaboration with SUSE

Regardless of how fanatic we in the Free and Open Source world can be, calling-writing-arguing on terms like Free Software, Open Source, Linux or GNU/Linux, the painful truth is that there are not many widely used distributions which sport an enterprise solution besides the ‘community version‘, a place in computer history and the resulting reputation – bringing a certification to the table.

Actually, there are only two, one of them being SUSE. With roots in Slackware, SUSE has a dominant place in Linux distribution market but also a large piece of Linux Desktop & Server pies. For this reasons, LPI and then-Novell committed in 2010 on a still on-going partnership for granting SUSE Certified Linux Administrator (CLA) certification at no additional cost or exams to holders of LPIC-1. To further support this initiative SUSE Training Services has formally agreed to include the required LPIC-1 learning objectives in its CLA course training material, making this process work the other way around as well.

LPIC-1 SUSE CLA

Many people, after using SUSE and openSUSE, became dedicated users and later determined to continue this path professionally. In this context the LPIC 1 – SUSE CLA partnership is very important because is the first step of the certification path at SUSE. Having a full certification from LPI and one of the main Linux vendors, be it SUSE or Red Hat, is an important mark in the market place as professional specialization is what market needs today.

LPI at oSC

If you are a dedicated SUSE or openSUSE user – power user – admin – magician, you should consider getting LPIC 1 certified. It might be the first step to a more successful career in Free Software. The upcoming openSUSE Conference in Greece will feature a LPI Exam room, where you can take your test and get going with these professional certifications. See the oSC LPI page for more details. There will also be a session by Konstantinos Boukouvalas on the subject of Linux certification. Be there, it’s a great place to start your Linux career!

Article contributed by Konstantinos Boukouvalas, Operations Manager LPI MA Greece

SUSE sponsors new hardware for the Open Build Service

April 8th, 2013 by

UTSmOKcQdU_bodybgOver the last year, the Open Build Service (OBS) reference server, a service to build and distribute packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way, has been flooded with new packages, new distributions and even entire new architectures, deluging its build servers with compilation jobs. But spring is coming: SUSE has has just sponsored a rack server with some serious compute power for us to speed up your compilations. OBS will kick into high gear again! (more…)

Hackweek 9 is coming!

March 26th, 2013 by

hackweek 9 logo
The week starting on April 8 will be Hack Week 9 at SUSE! The SUSE engineers will be free to work on projects of their passion for a week. They work in teams or alone on projects, personal, upstream or new. Hackweek takes place both on-line and at SUSE offices all over the world. Each location has a program for the week itself but right now we’re in preparation mode. As always, we try to make the event as open as possible (that’s why we use github) so you can see what we’re planning and can join in the fun! (more…)

Announcing SUSE Business Track

October 18th, 2012 by

We are pleased to announce an additional track of talks and workshops as part of the openSUSE Conference 2012. On Monday, October 22nd at Masaryk College, Thakurova 1, Prague.

The focus of the track of talks and workshops will be on the use of Open Source and SUSE products in  business, both for the primary company mission and for support functions. Join key SUSE engineers and maangers to hear about the latest developments in:

  • Systems Management
  • High Availability
  • Green Computing
  • Agile Systems Management with SUSE Studio
  • Cloud

and many others. The full schedule is here.

The track is aimed at CIOs, CTOs, IT executives and managers, as well as
staff in IT interested in new technologies, challenges and opportunities
offered by Open Source.

Attendance is free, but please register at the conference website.  We look forward to seeing you there!

Hackweek 8 at SUSE

August 24th, 2012 by

What have the boot speed of openSUSE, a sandbox for KVM development, OpenStack, CUPS, Linux UEFI support and Enlightenment 17 to do with each other? They’re among the projects SUSE engineers worked on at Hackweek 8! From the 23rd to the 27th of July, the ‘normal’ development and maintenance tasks at SUSE took a backseat and the developers turned their attention to the various Open Source projects they fancied working on. Past projects have resulted in awesome tools like SUSE Paste, Debian support in OBS and of course Hackweek 7 brought us ARM in OBS! Read on to find out a some projects which were worked on and a bit about the results. (more…)