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Minutes from the last Face to Face Board meeting

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We’re Ready For The Release, Are You?!

November 18th, 2013 by

Release Geeko
Dear Geekos!

We’re sure you are all anxiously awaiting the release of openSUSE 13.1, coming in 24 hours. Yes, just around the corner! So we want to remind you that you can help us promote the release, plan release parties and of course read the many articles we’ve written! So much to do both before and after the release…

Before the release

There is still preparation to do: a lot to read about the release -so you can tell your friends about it- and some work in order to promote the release. You are very welcome in helping us to spread the word in your blog and other places!

Learn about the release

As a preparation for the release we wrote bunch of sneak peaks so you can learn about what is so cool in new openSUSE. Let’s start from the most visible parts – as always we have new versions of desktops environments. We write articles about both major ones – GNOME and KDE. Changes in these two are probably the most visible to the end user. We hope exactly the opposite happening with YaST. There were really big changes under the hood of YaST this release as we wrote. The interface and functionality are both the same, so users will barely notice, but we hope an horde of new developers attracted by the new code.

We also wrote about more hardcore/geeky stuff. "Cloud" is still a magical and cool word and we have everything you need to create your own cloud in openSUSE. Check out what is new in this area! And as this is more sysadmins cup of tea, let’s mention yet another article that we prepared. This one is full of useful tips and tricks. Even if you are skilled sysadmin, you might learn a thing or two there that will make your everyday life easier.

And last but not least, don’t forget about all the love and attention that have been put into Btrfs. Even whether is not the default option for new installations, openSUSE 13.1 looks like the best choice for everybody wanting to try this next generation filesystem.

Promote the release

You might have seen that we created some cool materials to promote the release. There are banners, backgrounds for social media accounts and more in this article and we have this cool “Release Geeko” background for you:

ReleaseIsComingBackground

Release Geeko background

Find more related artwork in our github repository.

During the release day

For the release itself, we created both Facebook event and G+ event to be sure that no one forgets (like if it is possible to forget the release date of your favorite Linux distribution). But more important, there will be public hangout on G+ as part of the G+ event, so you can join and share your excitement about the new release. Apart from that, we will be updating all our social channels all day long, so don’t worry, you will not miss anything… and you are also welcome to help in these tasks.

After the release

In the party department, there have been people planning launch parties already. At the moment of writing, we are already aware of parties in:

  • Orlando FL, just a couple of days ago
  • Nuremberg, punctually at the release day
  • Copenhagen, the day after
  • SUSE offices in Prague, next week
  • Zacatecas, during Free Software Lab-COZCyT
  • Taipei, in the near future (stay tuned, more information coming)

If you would like to attend a launch party in your neighborhood, check the Launch Party wiki and if there’s no party yet, read this article with some tips on solving that problem ;-)

We hope you are now a little more prepared for the release. And, of course, not forget to…

have a lot of fun!

openSUSE Summit Was Geeko Awesome

November 18th, 2013 by

Orlando - not so sunny

Our openSUSE Summit 2013 has just finished here in Orlando. We were hosted in a Mexican themed hotel in the area of Disney World, with our own special area setup nicely for our presentations and workshops. The location was a nice new touch for the geeko friends to reconnect and collaborate, if only because there was a large number of lizards all around here!

Weather wasn’t very loving down here in Florida, USA but being in such a family-like get together, it didn’t really matter. Read the rest of this entry »

Sneak Peek openSUSE 13.1: Geeko Tips

November 13th, 2013 by

WinterIsComingFinalWelcome to our fourth Sneak Peek for openSUSE 13.1! The release is getting very close and you’ve already learned about all the awesome new Cloud features, the new YaST and what our new GNOME and KDE fans will get. Today, we feature a much requested article: some in-depth Geeko Tips!

Tips?

Last release, we featured a set of geeko tips for new users. If you come from Fedora, Gentoo or Ubuntu, that’s the article to read. It not only explains what all that green is about but also gives openSUSE equivalents of your familiar terminal commands and introduces you to YaST, getting software on openSUSE and more. Talking about software, we featured some interesting tips in that area with in this article about getting the latest fresh software from the Open Build Service. Finally, find some more tips and information on using the repositories on OBS and One-Click-Install in this blog post.
OWN-oxygen-Tips-and-Tricks

Going advanced

In this article, we’re going a step deeper, bringing you some more tips and tricks we got from the openSUSE community.

zypper

We got many zypper tips. Lots is already in the article for new geekos but we have some ‘deeper’ tips here.
Some useful commands:

  • rpmqpack – lists currently installed packages (without version)
  • rpm -qa –qf ‘%{name}-%{version}-%{release}.%{arch}\n’ – lists currently installed packages (with full version and architecture)
  • rpm -q –qf “%{DISTURL}\n” PACKAGE – gives you an OBS URL to the exact sources for the package PACKAGE. You can, for instance, check them out with osc co DISTURL
  • awk -F\| ‘$6 && $2 == “install” {print $3}’ /var/log/zypp/history – list all packages explicitly installed
  • zypper sh – runs zypper shell, no need to type zypper for each command
  • zypper -v dup -D – simulate(Dry run) an upgrade on all active repositories
  • zypper moo – makes debian users feel at home
The Geekos in Greece!

The Geekos in Greece!

journald

journald is replacing the old logging technologies in openSUSE (at least for most common cases). The two most important commands you need to know:

  • journalctl – the old “cat /var/log/messages”
  • journalctl -f – the old “tail -f /var/log/messages”

Network installation

Network install is native to openSUSE. Just use the dvd as source to install from network. This tool can help a lot for network deployments (or VMs): openSUSE-ipxe on github.

etc-update

New in this release is a Gentoo tool ported to openSUSE: etc-update. This tool goes through your configuration in /etc and merges new configuration files with your own modifications automatically or presents you the differences and lets you merge the changes.
etc-update is used to merge config files in non-intrusive cli way. It goes file by file in etc, where you can show unified diff and merge the changes as whole or interactively. It can merge trivial changes by itself “-p” preen option, or you can also set the default action to take on all files “automerge, discard, …”. Basically you just run “etc-update” and then press numbers on what action you want to take :)

Easy OBS

A major technology in openSUSE is the Open Build Service or OBS. We’ve got it running on build.opensuse.org where it servers tens of thousands of packagers building hundreds of thousands of packages for one or more of the 15+ different distributions on 8+ architectures. And this can be massively useful – to you! Information on using the repositories on OBS and One-Click-Install in this blog post, but here we’ll focus on how to use OBS to BUILD packages. A simple and graphical tutorial for re-building a package for a different openSUSE version can be found here.

For you command line aficionados interested in more deep changes, here’s the nitty gritty way of customizing/updating or rebuilding packages (we call this process BURPing). If you haven’t set the OBS tool up yet, find a how-to of your first steps with osc here.

geekos!Branch
osc bco /
Update
cd home::branches:/
Change it, fix it, break it
Test your changes with

osc build
Commit your changes to OBS with
osc ci
Request a submit of your changes
osc sr
to the Package

Fixing a package in a released openSUSE distribution and releasing it as maintenance update is as easy as that.
Branch
osc branch -M -c openSUSE:12.3
Update
cd home::branches:openSUSE:12.3:Update/
Change it, fix it, break it
Test your changes with

osc build
Commit your changes to OBS with
osc ci
Request a submit of your changes
osc mr
to the Package

And done! Yes, it really is that easy to contribute to openSUSE and make the distro better for yourself <em>and</em> everybody else.

That’s it for now

We’re out of tips for now, but if you’ve got any – please share them below! We can use them in the next article with Geeko Tips…

Have a lot of fun!

Get Ready to Party: Release is Around the Corner!

November 11th, 2013 by

release is comingIn just a little over a week, openSUSE 13.1 will be released! As we’ve all put in serious work to make this happen, it is certainly a good cause for celebration. Time to organize Launch Parties!

Launch Parties

A launch parties are to celebrate an openSUSE release. To start with the celebration part, as we all enjoy hanging out with fellow geekos, just having a space where you can talk and perhaps drink a beverage of choice should do the trick just fine. Of course, conversation starts easier if there is a subject to discuss – and that is where the release comes in! By the time the release is out, there is plenty of information on the openSUSE 13.1 Portal page that can be discussed.

Release parties are part of openSUSE. That means: they should be open, cool and featuring lots of fun! That doesn’t mean just following a ‘code of conduct‘, no, it means going out to people and being inviting! We’re all geekos, we’re all the same and we’re in this together, so we’re all responsible for each others fun.
Party time

Organizing

Organizing a release party requires the following three simple steps:

      1. Find a space. Simple is good: perhaps a room in your university, office or a cafe or restaurant.
      2. Register your launchparty on this wiki page
      3. Invite people: create a facebook and G+ event page, and send a mail to relevant mailing lists
        - like your local translation list or the project list… A blog can be helpful, too.

    Finally, Have a lot of fun! Welcome every new geeko and remind them that we’re all here for fun: talk to everybody you don’t know first! Perhaps a quick presentation on what is new is nice but not mandatory. Just remember: people are what makes openSUSE, so bringing them together is all that really counts.

    See this how-to for more info and tips!

    If you want to party on the release date, consider joining our G+ release day hangout!

    Have a lot of fun!

Sneak Peek openSUSE 13.1: What we have for Plasma Desktop Users

November 4th, 2013 by

Release Geeko Biting KDEA few days ago we featured a GNOME Sneak Peek and today it is time for the Blue camp! Whereas GNOME is still going through radical changes, KDE has been in incremental mode for quite a while, polishing their Plasma Desktop, Netbook interfaces and developing the new Plasma Active interface for touch devices. In this article we’ll introduce Plasma, providing a background to the choices behind Plasma and then review some of the major changes for this release. Read the rest of this entry »

openSUSE 13.1 RC2 Hits the Web, Last Chance for Testing

October 31st, 2013 by

RC2 is coming
The openSUSE 13.1 release is getting very close – just a little over two weeks, according to the Roadmap. Today, Release Candidate 2 is available on software.opensuse.org. Grab one of the images and help us test!

What’s new

The changes in this update are not very big or ground shaking. This is a sign of openSUSE 13.1 maturing quickly: we focused on bug fixing. Obviously, the bugfixing hackathon helped a lot. Below is a limited list of changes (omitting most bug fixes):

  • systemd was updated to version 208
  • Shim should now work which means the secure boot is possible
  • Plasma-nm no longer replaces the knetworkmanager
  • Calibre is now fully operational
  • kernel was updated with more fixes and one speedy improvement everyone could read about on phoronix (the radeon/nouveau timer improvements)
  • In the area of virtualization the xen and libvirt packages were updated
  • A lot of migration issues were fixed so zypper dup from older release will go smoother
  • Apper should no longer choke on multiple license agreements
  • YaST parts were updated fixing bunch of installer bugs
  • XFCE can now properly suspend
  • e17 artwork was openSUSEfied (yay!)
  • Akonadi should better handle PostgreSQL as backend
  • Our vlc version was updated to 2.1 which is the latest and coolest provided
  • Translations updates

And again, this is a partial list: there are bugfixes for many issues reported by testers included.
Testing-Group-Logo

Testing

openSUSE 13.1 will have to stand up right in a proud tradition of great stability so it will need a final serious workout before we release it upon the world! We wrote about testing a while ago, and we urge you to check out that article and help out!

We ask you to give some extra attention to:

  • btrfs!
  • livecd’s and usb live sticks – these did not work in RC1, which was in part because this is hard to test automatically. We have some tests set up but manual testing is really needed to ensure the live images work well.
  • Secure Boot/UEFI. If you have a machine with Secure Boot and UEFI and 12.3 didn’t work for you, please, test this 13.1 RC2. With this RC2 we added a fix related with the alignment of certificates that can cause fails on some UEFI firmware.

A list of the most annoying bugs can be found here.

Have a lot of fun!

Board Elections Coming!

October 30th, 2013 by

GeekoVote
The end of the year is approaching. And besides Santa and fireworks, Geekos know: the openSUSE board gets a refresh! The openSUSE Election Committee has announced the time line for this year’s elections and asked candidates to step forward for the job!

Elections

This year, 4 seats are to be elected, two for a two year term and two for a 1 year term. As always, all openSUSE members are eligible to vote. Anybody contributing to openSUSE over a longer period of time can become a member – if you’re not a member yet, you should apply and get your vote in!

Anybody can step up to be on the board, as long as they are openSUSE Members (and not a member of the Election Committee). You can announce your candidacy by emailing the openSUSE Project mailing list AND the Election Committee, best with a short introduction about yourself and information on why people should vote for you.

Role of the board

As board member, you’re a central point of contact for openSUSE. SUSE talks to you about what they’re up to but also people in the project itself will come to the board with issues, conflicts or wishes. The board handles the regular project meetings on IRC (and once a year at the openSUSE conference) as well as trademark issues. The board works with teams like the Travel Support Team and the Marketing team, where travel- and material budgets are involved as well. Find some information about current and past board members on the wiki.

Time line for the elections

For these elections, this is the time line:

  • 28.10. Start of standing up for candidacy, nominating candidates, apply for membership
  • 18.11. Start of candidates campaign
  • 2.12. Ballots open
  • 15.12. End of voting
  • 16.12. Announcement of the results

Be a part of it!

Click here to cast your vote! Note that you have to be logged in with your usual openSUSE credentials to see this page and cast your vote.

Sneak Peek openSUSE 13.1: What we have for GNOME Users

October 29th, 2013 by
GNOME Shell GNOME 13.1

Clean GNOME Shell

Welcome to our third Sneak Peek of what is coming in openSUSE 13.1! You’ve already learned about the new Cloud features and YaST having been ported to Ruby and  it’s time to talk about… our desktops! We kick this off with GNOME 3.10.

Sticking with our philosophy for shipping the latest and the greatest, openSUSE 13.1 will offer GNOME 3.10 at installation. A great deal has changed since 3.6, and many new features have been added. The GNOME experience is now more coherent and complete with the addition of new apps and the polishing of Gnome-Shell. GNOME has become a solid desktop environment, beautiful to work in and suitable for every kind of daily operation. Read the rest of this entry »

Help test the openSUSE Release Candidates!

October 22nd, 2013 by

RC1 is here_black
openSUSE made its first release candidate for 13.1 available less than two weeks ago. And with it, we issued a call for testing. If you’re interested in helping out but would appreciate a few pointers on how to do so, read on! Read the rest of this entry »

openSUSE Summit Schedule Ready!

October 21st, 2013 by

openSUSE Summit 2013 logo
As you may well know, Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort in beautiful Florida will welcome all Geekos to this year’s openSUSE Summit from November 15 to 17. This will be a great event, if the brand new schedule is any indication! It has just been made public, together with information about our keynote speakers. Read the rest of this entry »