Home Home > Tag > bugs
Sign up | Login

Posts Tagged ‘bugs’

openSUSE Announces First Public Release of openQA

October 11th, 2011 by

The openSUSE Project announces the 1.0 release of the unique cross-distribution-capable, fully automated testing framework openQA. openQA is the only comprehensive testing tool which can run tests on every level of the OS, from core functionality like the bootloader and booting the kernel up to testing applications like Firefox and LibreOffice. It shows the results in a convenient web interface and allows testers to see screenshots and even videos of the issues found. openQA is used to run nightly tests of the ‘Factory’ development repository for the upcoming openSUSE 12.1 release. openQA is available under the GPL version 2 or later.
(more…)

Open-Bugs-Day on Sunday the 20th of February

February 16th, 2011 by

As you all know, we’re closing in on the Final Release of openSUSE 11.4…

and so in this last window for bug-fixing we need your help! The testing team is looking for volunteers to help with bugs in bugzilla on the Open-Bugs-Day at Sunday the 20th of February. Participants are going through the bugs that currently exist for 11.4 in bugzilla, close what is fixed and confirm what still needs some work. It’s all part of a final push for a great 11.4 release, with us clearing out what is fixed, the developers can focus their energies on fixing bugs instead of clicking around in bugzilla! We will meet, hang out and coordinate during the Open-Bugs-Day in the IRC channel #opensuse-testing on the Freenode network and anyone using openSUSE is welcome to help. Read on to learn more about how you can make a difference.

(more…)

openSUSE 11.3 Milestone 3 is out!

March 15th, 2010 by

Geeko at work

The third of seven scheduled milestone releases for 11.3 was completed and released on schedule. Milestone 3 focuses on using GCC 4.5 as the default compiler, leaving a great deal of the work in the hands of the openSUSE Build Service after a few issues (such as kernel panics) were resolved.

(more…)

Status of the e1000e Issue

October 3rd, 2008 by

This is an update on the status of the e1000e issue. Our openSUSE 11.1 Beta 1 release contained a bug that would cause the non-volatile memory (NVM) of the e1000e controller to be corrupted in certain hardware combinations. This NVM is shared with other components of the system.

We are still working on root-causing the issue, in close cooperation with developers from Intel and the general Linux community.

In the Beta 2 release, the e1000e driver has been augmented with several kernel patches that prevent all of the plausible scenarios where the NVM would be overwritten. This includes a patch that enables write-protection of the NVM. In order to corrupt the NVM with this patch in place, an application or kernel module would have to undo this write protection explicitly before being able to erase the NVM. Most of these protective measures have been implemented within the e1000e driver.

All tests performed so far have shown that with these protections in place, we are unable to reproduce the NVM corruption that could be seen with beta1. On some machines that were tested, a beta1 installation could lead to NVM corruption within 10-30 reboots, whereas a beta2 installation would perform 270 reboots without corrupting the NVM.

Therefore, we have made a conscious decision to leave the e1000e driver enabled by default. We think with the additional safeguards in place (most of which are part of the e1000e driver), the NVM is better protected than without loading the driver. This is based on the assumption that the e1000e driver shares the NVM with other parts of the system.

Nevertheless, users have the option to install beta2 with the e1000e driver disabled, by adding the following to the kernel command line when booting from the installation CD/DVD:

broken_modules=e1000e

This will prevent the driver from being loaded during installation, and will also add it to the file /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist, which will prevent it from being loaded automatically in the future.

Kernel Bug Squashing Day on Wednesday, July 30

July 21st, 2008 by

The kernel team is going to be hosting a kernel bug squashing day on Wednesday, July 30th. The goals of the bug squashing day are to:

  • Reduce the number of kernel bugs in openSUSE’s bugzilla
  • Get rid of old / invalid bugs in bugzilla and find duplicates
  • Send patches and bugs upstream
  • Test and review fixes for kernel bugs

If you’re interested in helping, join the kernel team on #opensuse-kernel on irc.freenode.net.They’ll be at it all day on Wednesday, July 30th starting at 00:00 UTC — so all time zones have equal opportunity to participate!

openSUSE Wants Your Vote (on Bugs)

May 19th, 2008 by

Attention openSUSE users and contributors! It’s time to exercise your vote and help the openSUSE team identify the bugs that need to be squashed prior to the openSUSE 11.0 release. On May 22nd, we’re having a bug voting day to help ensure we identify the most troublesome issues in Bugzilla under openSUSE 11.0.

Please join us on Thursday, May 22nd from 07:00 UTC until 19:00 UTC. Check out the voting instructions on the Bugzilla and openSUSE wiki. We’ll also have live help available in the #openSUSE-Factory channel on Freenode.

If you don’t have a Bugzilla account yet, you can sign up for one here. You know you want one! Sign up today!

By prioritizing the bugs, we can ensure that we’ve got the right bugs in our sights for the openSUSE 11.0 release.

Of course, you can help with bug voting at any time. There’s no need to wait for a bug day! Just roll up your sleeves and head over to the openSUSE Bugzilla and jump right in.

Questions or suggestions before the bug day? Drop me a note at zonker@opensuse.org.

Blast the bugs out of YaST on April 25: Operation YaST Smash

April 21st, 2008 by

The openSUSE Project is going Bug Smashing on April 25, and we want you to join us! We’re looking for openSUSE users and contributors who have some time to help triage YaST bugs and clean up Bugzilla.

Join us on #openSUSE-Factory from 09:00 to 18:00 CEST. We’ll be going through the Bugzilla and reviewing YaST bugs to see which bugs are still valid, gathering information about existing bugs, and generally paring down the bug count to help developers focus on the most crucial problems.

Anyone can participate — you don’t have to be a developer or power user to join in, just point your browser at the openSUSE Bugzilla, log in (be sure to create an account if you don’t have one already) and start searching for bugs against YaST. Help verify bugs that are in Bugzilla, and help close bugs that have already been fixed.

Our goal for Friday is to get the YaST bug count in Bugzilla down and clear the field for YaST developers to concentrate on real bugs that need to be smashed for the openSUSE 11.0 release. You can see the current open bugs here.

Why do we do Bug Smashing days? We want to do a couple of things. First, we want to help to train new contributors who haven’t done bug reporting and triage before. By holding a Bug Smashing Day we can be ready to answer questions and provide support for new bug smashers in real time.

Second, we want to focus our attention on a specific application or feature. In this case, we want to focus on YaST and help clean up the bug database so the YaST team can concentrate on the real problems.

What do you need to participate? Just a Bugzilla account, a system with a relevant release of openSUSE, and be signed in to #openSUSE-Factory.

Can’t participate in the Bug Smashing days? No problem. We encourage Bugzilla cleanup all year round! See the page on submitting bug reports, and join us on #opensuse-factory on Freenode.

Have questions about Bug Smashing? See the Bug Reporting FAQ. If your question still isn’t answered, send a note to Christoph Thiel or Joe ‘Zonker’ Brockmeier.

Another Step in Connecting the Worlds of Users And Developers

December 18th, 2007 by

As you know for sure ;), the openSUSE Build Service (OBS) shall connect the complete different worlds of End-Users and developers/packager. This does of course already worked to that degree that everybody can download software, which got packaged in the OBS. Also the packager do already got feedback via download numbers, tags or rating within the packager web interface.

Andreas Bauer added lately the next functionality in this context. All search results in the End User interface do offer now a link to the packager web interface from now on. Every user, with a standard openSUSE account can now do the ratings and taging there directly. This will help the to improve the search results for other users later on.

Also new is the bugreport link, this means end users can create bugreports for projects or packages hosted in OBS. Such a bugreport will get assigned to the person, who is defined as bugowner. Atm only a few projects have this defined, so this is a call to all project or package owners to add yourself. This can be done easily in the web gui, simply add yourself again to the project, but switch to the “bugowner” role.

(more…)