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openSUSE Kicks Off Development with Milestone 1

May 17th, 2013 by

13.1-Milestone1
openSUSE is pleased to announce that the newest Milestone for the upcoming version of openSUSE 13.1. is available for testing. As early version, it is expected that this Milestone is not fully functional or very stable and we welcome bug reports and fixes for the issues. This is the first in a series of upcoming updates to the distribution that will end with the final release of 13.1 projected by November of 2013. As usual with an alpha release, the most prominent changes in openSUSE 13.1 Milestone 1 come from the upgrades that packages are going through.

Major updates

Some major updates below:

  • GNOME 3.6 > 3.8.1
  • apache2 2.2.22 > 2.4.3
  • digikam 3.0.0 > 3.1.0
  • giflib 4.1.6 > 5.0.3
  • icecream 0.9.7 > 1.0.0
  • kernel 3.7.10 > 3.9.0
  • libreoffice 3.6.3.2.4 > 4.0.2.2.1
  • ocaml 3.12.1 > 4.00.1
  • qemu 1.3.0 > 1.4.0
  • qt-creator 2.6.2 > 2.7.0
  • ruby 1.9.3 > 2.0
  • systemd 195 > 202
  • wpa_supplicant 1.1 > 2.0
  • xorg-x11-server 1.13.2 > 1.14.1

Most Annoying Bugs

The list of most annoying bugs is still short. We’re looking towards you to help us make that list bigger! We need to find out what’s wrong so we can fix it. You can report bugs with this link. The process of reporting bugs involves a couple of steps that you can take in order to contribute with the distribution. Reporting bugs and problems with the packages is essential for openSUSE to retain its stability. Please review our sections on how to contribute to factory, and submitting bug reports.

You’re more than welcome to organize some bug-finding-and-squashing sessions! Take a look at previous efforts in our last beta-pizza-party!

Planned Changes

Some time ago, the team posted a suggested list of changes for openSUSE 13.1. The idea behind this is to accept the changes provided by the community and at the same time meet specific team goals. Please keep in mind that this list is subject to change but it helps when understanding where the next release of openSUSE would like to go.

For the base system, planned changes include updating GCC to version 4.8 and working on the latest integrations for the Linux Kernel. On booting there was a discussion looking to completely move to SYSTEMD and dropping SYSVINIT. Replacing MKINITRD with Dracut.

On the KDE environment the planned list includes making PHONON support GSTREAMER 1.0 and replacing Kopete, largely unmaintained now, to KDE Telepathy. Gnome is also looking to change a few things in 13.1 starting by adding Gnome 3.10, cleaning out some outdated libraries and changing its default theme to a greener one.

On security the list is simple so far, AppArmor will be promoted further as a preferred security suite and updating SELinux.

Get involved!

This list of possible changes can also be altered by your participation. If you are a developer looking to learn and participate of the openSUSE project through coding, packaging or coordinating efforts to include certain software on the distribution, go to our factory page and learn more about how to contribute code. The process of working packages into the factory release is also documented in an article for the release of openSUSE 12.3. If you are interested in making contributions for packages, please go here and get packaging! Although the link is for 12.3, keep in mind that the packaging process done on 13.1 is the same. If your are familiar with branching projects through GIT, making contributions to the factory development should be easy for you. In simple words, you access the openSUSE repository, branch the specific part you would like to work on, make the appropriate updates and then you make requests to our team to include your changes.

However, the work on openSUSE is not only belonging or limited to packaging. There is far more that can be done here. Marketing, team coordination, translation, artwork, etc. These are simple examples of what more of you could be doing for the team. If you are willing to participate, take a look at this page and choose!

Schedule

Master Coolo published a simple road map. The next milestone is expected for 6 of June, 2013. the next milestones come with about a month in between, Beta 1 is planned for the 19th of September, RC one will be on October 10 and RC2 on October 31st.

OSC2010 Sneak Peaks – Vincent Untz: Explaining GNOME 3

September 15th, 2010 by
The openSUSE Conference brings together users, contributors and friends of the openSUSE project from 20th to 23rd October in Nuremberg, Germany. Over four days, more than seventy talks and workshops explore the theme of ‘Collaboration Across Borders‘ in Free and Open Source software communities, administration and development. The conference is the yearly get-together of  the openSUSE project to give its people a chance to meet face to face, talk to and inspire each other. It takes place in the Berufsförderungswerk Nuremberg in the beautiful surroundings of the Franconian metropole. Everybody interested is welcome to join and enjoy the program which starts each day at 9am, the admission is free. The openSUSE Conference 2010 Sneak Peaks will introduce some speakers and talks to you.

Today we feature the talk “Explaining GNOME 3″ from Vincent Untz.


Hey Vincent, glad to have you on this series. Let’s talk (about) the talk. First of all I would like you to introduce yourself to the, likely, small crowd of people who don’t know you yet. Who are you and what do you do?

For the very few people who don’t know me (I estimate there are only a few billions out there), I’m Vincent. The two important things to know about me are that I’m French and I love ice cream. And when I’m not eating ice cream, I also contribute to free software! I work on openSUSE and on GNOME, and apparently, I can also work on both at the same time, when I work on GNOME in openSUSE :-) Thanks to Novell, I can contribute on my work time since I’m a member of the openSUSE Boosters.

… and here we are, thinking you only eat baguettes!

So, obviously, I don’t know if your baguette comment will end up in the interview. But if it does, I have to mention that ice cream and baguettes do not mix well.

Everything will end up in the interview, so behave! :) Okay given the title of your talk, Explaining GNOME 3, i take it it will be about explaining gnome 3 right? What needs explaining there?

Ah, I guess, one thing to know about me too is that I submit talks with titles, without knowing what I’ll talk about ;-) So it could well be that “Explaining GNOME 3″ turns out to be about something completely different. That being said, I might keep the submitted topic since GNOME 3 is a big step for the GNOME project, and what we are trying to achieve is not always crystal clear from the outside. There are at least two parts of the talks that I can think of right now, which will likely be of interest to the audience:

  1. Why does the GNOME project need to do GNOME 3, instead of keeping the 2.x way forever? After all, GNOME 2.x is all about evolutionary steps, and that’s something we could keep doing.
  2. The vision of what we want GNOME 3 to be. People do not always see the long-term vision of a project, and clarifying it does help understand the changes we’re implementing.

A third part that we feel is important is explaining GNOME Shell: it’s a big move where people feel it will directly affect their interaction with the computer

(more…)

openSUSE Build Service Integrates with openDesktop.org to reach 150,000 contributors

December 17th, 2009 by

Today Frank Karlitschek, maintainer of the openDesktop.org network, announced that the first step of integration with openDesktop.org is complete. Effective immediately, developers can add their Build Service ID to projects on openDesktop.org, and all packages available from the openSUSE Build Service will automatically show up on the openDesktop.org pages.

The openDesktop.org sites include openDesktop.org, KDE-Apps.org, GNOME-Apps.org, KDE-Look.org, and GNOME-Look.org. The openDesktop.org network reaches more than 150,000 registered contributors, and has more than 90 million page views per month from 2 million unique visitors. This is an excellent opportunity for the openSUSE Build Service to reach a much wider audience and deliver on the goal of providing packages for all major Linux distributions.

The integration solves a problem for openDesktop.org users in that applications on openDesktop.org are often available only as source or binaries for a limited number of Linux distributions. We want to worktogether with openDesktop.org and other organizations to make the openSUSE Build Service a tool to build and provide packages for all major Linux distributions.

The work between openDesktop.org and the openSUSE Project has been in progress for several months. Plans are also in the works to allow upload directly from Qt-Create or KDevelop to the openSUSE Build Service and KDE-Apps.org.

openSUSE 11.2 Released!

November 12th, 2009 by

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the release of openSUSE 11.2.  openSUSE 11.2 includes new versions of GNOME, KDE, OpenOffice.org, Firefox, the Linux kernel, and many, many more updates and improvements. In 11.2 you’ll find more than 1,000 open source desktop applications. openSUSE also includes a full suite of server software and a rich selection of open source development tools.

You can find a bevy of screenshots and more on the openSUSE wiki, and a lengthy list of packages and version numbers on DistroWatch.

Let’s take a look at some of the more interesting features of openSUSE 11.2!

openSUSE Desktop

As always, openSUSE provides everything you need to get started with Linux on the desktop.

openSUSE 11.2 includes KDE 4.3 as the “default” desktop. If you install from DVD without changing anything, you’ll have the KDE desktop by default. However, we still provide GNOME as an equal choice, and Xfce and other window managers as alternative desktops too!

KDE 4.3 is a major update to the KDE platform. It includes improved networking support, and work to make Firefox and OpenOffice.org better integrated with the KDE enviroment. The openSUSE Project also worked closely with the KDE Project on theming and branding to provide a look and feel that meshes both projects nicely.

You’ll also find plenty of GNOME greatness in openSUSE 11.2 as well. GNOME 2.28, the latest release of the popular GNOME desktop, is included with 11.2. This release includes a brand new theme, improved software update application, improvements in GNOME’s Webcam and video application, and many other enhancements and improvements to prepare the GNOME platform for GNOME 3.0 in 2010.

OpenOffice.org 3.1 is a complete office productivity suite compatible with Microsoft Office. This release includes improvements in change tracking and collaboration in Writer, and major improvements to the drawing application.

Social networking gets a boost in 11.2 with the addition of GNOME and KDE microblogging clients that handle multiple social network sites, Gwibber, and Choqok.

With openSUSE 11.2, you have the ability to install GNOME or KDE live media from USB, and numerous improvements to make openSUSE 11.2 much better on netbooks.

Under the Hood

The desktop improvements are the most noticeable, but there’s plenty going on under the hood as well in openSUSE 11.2.

Storage improvements include the ability to encrypt the entire hard disk, for users concerned about data security. Users can also take advantage of the next generation of filesystems for Linux with Ext4 or btrfs. In case you’d like to learn more about the new kernel features you can go at KernelNewbies.org and have a look at the “cool stuff” part.

Want to manage remote openSUSE servers with a Web interface? That day is coming soon! openSUSE 11.2 users can install the first technology preview of WebYaST: a Web-based remote administration tool for openSUSE systems.

Finally, you can upgrade in-place using Zypper! Though it’s been possible to do an upgrade in place for some time, with caution, it’s finally a “recommended” method of upgrade with openSUSE 11.2. For users who want to move from 11.1 to 11.2 using “zypper dup,” see Andreas Jaeger’s post on Lizards about the process. It’s quick, it’s easy, and almost competely painless.

Linux for Education

The openSUSE Build Service provides thousands of applications as 1-click packages to enhance your experience on openSUSE 11.2. The openSUSE Education Community provides hundreds of Educational applications suitable for students of all ages, parents, teachers and IT administrators of educational institutions via the Build Service.

The 11.2 release will be followed closely by a very special spin, Li-f-e: Linux for Education. Li-f-e contains GNOME, KDE as well the the award-winning Sugar learning environment for children. With packages from the Packman repository, Li-f-e provides everything required to get rich multimedia experience too.

Media and Download

openSUSE is now available for immediate download! You have several choices of installation media and live CDs (which are also installable).

  • openSUSE 11.2 Installable DVD 32-bit
  • openSUSE 11.2 Installable DVD 64-bit
  • openSUSE 11.2 GNOME 32-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 GNOME 64-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 KDE 32-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 KDE 64-bit Live CD

Booting openSUSE 11.2 from a USB key: get one of the Live CDs available above, and can copy it to a USB key with the following command:

dd if=image.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=4M

Replace “image.iso” with the name of the ISO image that you have downloaded, and replace “sdX” with the actual device name of your USB drive. Be careful! This will erase the target device, so make sure you have the correct device name and have any vital data backed up!

We want to hear from you!

The openSUSE Project has many channels of communication! Whether you prefer forums, email, or IRC, there are plenty of ways to communicate about openSUSE.

To keep up to date with openSUSE, be sure to keep an eye on openSUSE News and watch Planet SUSE for blog posts from the openSUSE community. We also update the @opensuse account on Twitter and Identi.ca regularly with news about the project.

Want to help the openSUSE Project? To get involved with openSUSE see the How to Participate page on the openSUSE wiki. We can use lots of different skills to help the project, so feel free to jump in!

Thanks!

openSUSE 11.2 represents the combined effort of hundreds of developers who participate in openSUSE, and thousands of developers in upstream projects that are shipped in openSUSE. The contributors, inside and outside the openSUSE Project, should be proud of this release, and they deserve a major “thank you” for all of the hard work and care that have gone into 11.2.

When we say “contributor,” we don’t mean only developers and packagers. This includes translators, openSUSE Ambassadors, the openSUSE Board, and the users who help power our forums and support users who are taking their first steps into Linux.

We are confident that openSUSE 11.2 is the best openSUSE release yet, and that it will help to encourage the use of Linux everywhere! We hope that you have a lot of fun while you use openSUSE 11.2!

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.2: GNOME 2.28

November 11th, 2009 by

With openSUSE 11.2 right around the corner, let’s take a look at what’s new and interesting in the GNOME desktop for this release. Highlights include a preview of GNOME 3.0, new applets and application updates, and the incredibly attractive Sonar theme new for 11.2.

Sonar Theme and Xinerama on openSUSE 11.2

For users coming from 11.1, openSUSE 11.2 actually features two GNOME releases worth of updates. Because of the lengthy release cycle, openSUSE skipped the 2.26 release and jumped to GNOME 2.28, which was made available in September.

Nautilus now has a plugin to allow quick and easy file sharing. Just right-click on the folder you’d like to share and select “Sharing Options.” This makes use of Samba, so you need to enable directory sharing under the Samba Server module in YaST.

New and Improved Cheese

New and Improved Cheese

The Webcam application for GNOME, Cheese, includes some enhancements for 2.28, including a redesigned interface that’s better suited for netbooks.

Not only does openSUSE feature the goodness from upstream GNOME, but also some home-grown improvements as well. For instance, the Sonar theme that is the default in 11.2. It’s a slightly darker, but still green, theme that’s pleasant to look at and show off to users new to Linux!

Vincent Untz, a member of the openSUSE Booster team and member of the GNOME Foundation Board, says that part of the main focus for 11.2 was “to be a better upstream citizen” with GNOME. So, for the most part, openSUSE does not diverge greatly from upstream GNOME — but there are some differences.

For example, GNOME 2.28 ships Empathy as the default instant messaging client. Untz says that it’s likely openSUSE will switch to Empathy in 11.3, but due to issues with some protocols and proxies, it was decided to keep Pidgin as the default client for one more release. Empathy is, of course, available via the repositories, so users who want to start with Empathy now can do so.

Want to get a preview of GNOME 3.0? The final GNOME 3.0 release isn’t due until September 2010, but openSUSE 11.2 has an early build of GNOME Shell in the repositories and users can see what all the fuss is about (or will be about), early on.

And, of course, you’ll find Firefox as the default Web browser for openSUSE instead of Epiphany. openSUSE users will find the most recent stable version of Firefox (3.5) on their GNOME desktop, though Epiphany and its new Webkit backend are available in the openSUSE 11.2 repositories.

All in all, there’s a lot to look forward to in GNOME in openSUSE 11.2. Be ready to grab it on November 12th!

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.1: The Latest GNOME Desktop

December 16th, 2008 by

In our continuing series of Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.1, we’re introducing the newest version of the GNOME desktop into openSUSE. openSUSE 11.1 will contain the latest version of the GNOME desktop, GNOME 2.24. Not only does this new version bring with it great new features, but as always the GNOME developers in the openSUSE Project have added our own unique polish to make a truly unique, polished desktop experience.

GNOME Desktop w/ SUSE GreeterGNOME Desktop

New in GNOME 2.24

As always, a new version of GNOME means new features and enhancements that make using your computer easier. Many times, they’re small features that once you start using them, you can’t live without. One example is the new tabbed browsing in Nautilus, the file browser.

File Broswer with Thumbs

Communication

openSUSE 11.1′s GNOME Desktop includes some of the latest and greatest in communication and organization tools in Evolution, Pidgin, and Ekiga. The newest version of Evolution contains new functionality to make anyone who sends out many similar emails a day, or those who are fans of Google’s online communication tools very happy.

Evolution can now save mail as templates. Need to have a simple, standard message to send out to contacts who all ask the same question? Or do you want a standard message to send to new clients? Either way, you’ll find a use for this handy feature.

Living in the Gmail universe, but don’t want to lose the safety and speed of having a desktop client? Now with Evolution, your Evolution Address Book can be synchronized with Google Contacts, meaning you now have the full range of Google support: Gmail through IMAP mail support, Google Calendar which synchronizes with your Evolution Calendar, and now contacts synchronization support.

Frequent instant messengers will be happy to see that the new version of Pidgin, our multi-network instant messaging and chat client, is included.

Pidgin can connect to all of your different instant messaging clients and social networks, including AIM, MSN/Windows Live, Yahoo! IM, and MySpace Chat. Pidgin also serves as an IRC chat client, through which community support for openSUSE can be received.

What to talk with your friends or family by voice or face-to-face? Meet Ekiga, the openSUSE Internet telephony client.

With Ekiga, a compatible microphone or webcam, and an SIP account (all of which can be set up upon first running Ekiga), talking to your friends, family, or colleagues is easy and free if they’re also using a SIP client. With an appropriate SIP call out plan, you can make affordable voice calls over the normal phone system, right from your computer!

Entertainment and Multimedia

When the work is done, it’s time to play! openSUSE 11.1′s GNOME contains some of the best multimedia playing and building applications available, from Banshee, our state-of-the-art music player; to Brasero, an innovative DVD and CD burning application which enables you to make videos from your computer burn on a DVD to share with friends and family; to F-Spot, an amazing yet amazingly simple photo organizer.

openSUSE’s Banshee Media Player is incredibly powerful, yet dead-simple to use. Bring over music from another operating system, a CD collection, or an MP3 player, and Banshee will catalog and apply cover art to them all. Organize and enjoy your movies with the video playback features. Stay up to date and entertained with your favorite audio and video podcasts, or listen to one of many streaming radio stations available. You can even discover new music with Last.fm, a music social network that’s built right in to Banshee.

Several new features are available in Banshee in openSUSE 11.1. Banshee now supports compilation albums. So whether it’s the greatest hits of the ’90s or the soundtrack to your favorite movie, Banshee now recognizes and correctly organizes compilation albums.

The developers of Banshee have taken special attention to the look and feel of Banshee. One of the areas this is most noticeable is the new Now Playing window. Although this pane is meant for showing videos, new in Banshee is that when playing audio, this window displays the album cover and song/show information, making it perfect for parties so your friends can see what’s playing.

Banshee also now supports Internet Radio. The application comes pre-installed with dozens of stations already, ranging from all spectrums of music to talk. Want to add more? As long as the Internet radio stream you wish to add has a compatible stream, it’s as simple as a click of the mouse in Banshee.

Managing photos on openSUSE is easy and fun with F-Spot, the photo manager. With F-Spot, you can browse your photo collection by date or tags, and making basic photo corrections is a snap. You can even export your photos to Internet photo websites, such as Flickr, Picasa, or SmugMug. F-Spot is also extend-able, with extensions written to make F-Spot even more powerful or more useful, such as an extension to export photos to Facebook. These are easily installed with just a few clicks of the mouse.

F-Spot in openSUSE 11.1 features a redesigned user interface, giving easy access and better descriptions to the photo editing tools, as well as easier access to photo metadata information in the sidebar.

Every now and then, you may have had duplicate photos show up in your library. What’s more annoying than that? Having to delete each one, one by one. Now, not only does F-Spot prevent duplicate photos by detecting duplicates upon importing new photos, but with a click of a mouse, F-Spot will analyze your entire photo library for duplicates and eliminate them.

You’ve got music, video, and photos on your computer. But what if you want to take them off your computer once in a while? With Brasero, the CD/DVD burning utility, it’s as easy as can be, and is included in openSUSE!

With Brasero you can save movies on DVDs to watch on your TV, save songs and other audio shows on CDs to play in the car, or burn ISO images onto discs.

Finally, when it’s just time to have fun, there’s Cheese. Cheese is a webcam studio app that, with a compatible webcam, allows you to take pictures or videos of yourself and your friends.

With Cheese, you can apply special effects to the pictures or video, and make a funny video to upload to YouTube or other video sharing website. You can even apply multiple effects, to create a unique image!

Configuration Improvements

openSUSE 11.1 features several new improvements for the GNOME desktop’s administration and configuration, including further YaST integration with GNOME, setting up 3G cellular data connections, and more.

YaST Integration Improvements

Even with the improving integration of YaST into GNOME, YaST has still remained with the same button and UI structure of it’s KDE counterpart, which doesn’t exactly match GNOME. With openSUSE 11.1, YaST has been given a visual refresh. Now, at the top of every YaST screen is a short description of what the YaST module does, with a link to getting further help. The buttons have also been relabeled so they match the GNOME standard, meaning YaST now truly looks at home on the GNOME desktop!

Cellular Broadband Connectivity

Since openSUSE 11.0, openSUSE has been able to easily connect to cellular broadband networks (with the correct card installed in the computer). This continues for openSUSE 11.1, with NetworkManager handling the connectivity. So connecting to cell networks is nearly as simple as connecting to a WiFi hotspot.

Multi-monitor Support

Another feature that has been in openSUSE for a while is the great multi-monitor support. With a simple applet and automatic configuration of extra monitors, using more than one monitor in openSUSE 11.1 is as simple as can be.

New Login

openSUSE 11.1 includes a revamped login screen for GNOME. Simply click on your name, and enter your pasword. No more having to remember and type both usernames and passwords, it’s a simple process. Plus, access accessibility and multi-monitor settings right from the login screen, making the experience more open to everyone. In addition, the background in the login screen is time sensitive: if it’s midnight where you are, your screen is a pleasant dark color. If it’s high noon, you’re in for a bright login!

Counting Down the Days

With only days to go until openSUSE 11.1 is released and you can try these features for yourself, so get ready! Plus, there are more Sneak Peeks coming in the next few days, so stay tuned to openSUSE News for all things openSUSE!

Banshee 1.4 Released

November 14th, 2008 by

Aaron Bockover has announced that the 1.4 release of Banshee is now available. The new release includes support for Android G1, better device support, a new track editor, the ability to rescan libraries for new or deleted tracks — plus 196 bugs fixed since Banshee 1.2.1.

See the Banshee download page for the one-click installer for openSUSE 11.1 and 10.3, as well as packages for other platforms.

Announcing openSUSE 11.0 GM

June 19th, 2008 by

The openSUSE Project is proud to announce the release of openSUSE 11.0 — everything you need to get started with Linux on the desktop and on the server. Promoting the use of Linux everywhere, the openSUSE Project provides free, easy access to the world’s most usable Linux distribution, openSUSE.

The 11.0 release of openSUSE includes more than 200 new features specific to openSUSE, a redesigned installer that makes openSUSE even easier to install, faster package management thanks to major updates in the ZYpp stack, and KDE 4, GNOME 2.22, Compiz Fusion, and much more.

On the Desktop


Whether you use GNOME or KDE, the openSUSE 11.0 desktop is a beautiful experience. Users have the choice of GNOME 2.22, KDE 4, KDE 3.5, Xfce, and more! See the screenshot page for a in-depth look at the openSUSE desktop.

GNOME 2.22

GNOME users will find a lot to like in openSUSE 11.0. openSUSE’s GNOME is very close to upstream GNOME, because Novell and openSUSE want to do as much work as possible in the upstream release. However, we do modify GNOME’s artwork to provide a unified look and feel for the distro. The default GNOME configuration, such as panel layout, is slightly different than “stock” GNOME, and the openSUSE GNOME team backports a number of bug fixes into our GNOME release to ensure stability and the best possible GNOME experience.

GNOME 2.22

GNOME 2.22 in openSUSE 11.0 includes the GNOME Virtual File System (GVFS), with better support for networked file systems, PulseAudio for better sound management, improvements in Evolution and Tomboy, and much more!

KDE 4.0

openSUSE 11.0 is the first openSUSE release to include a stable release of KDE 4.0. This release includes sweeping changes in the KDE desktop, and represents the next generation of KDE. This release includes a new desktop shell, called Plasma, a new look and feel (called Oxygen), and many interface and usability improvements.

KControl has been replaced with Systemsettings, which makes system configuration much easier. KDE’s window manager, KWin, now supports 3-D desktop effects.

KDE 4.0 doesn’t include KDEPIM applications, so the openSUSE team has included beta versions of the KDEPIM suite (KMail, KOrganizer, Akregator, etc.) from the KDE 4.1 branch that’s in development and scheduled to be released in July and for online update.

Note that KDE 3.5 is still available on the openSUSE DVD for KDE users who aren’t quite ready to make the leap to KDE 4.

KDE 4 on openSUSE 11.0

Compiz Fusion

The openSUSE desktop is not only a green glorious sight to behold, it’s also available in 3-D! Compiz Fusion is now the default in openSUSE 11.0. You’ll find a slew of interesting Compiz plugins, as well as easier configuration with Simple CompizConfig Settings Manager (CCSM) and the more comprehensive CompizConfig Settings Manager that allows detailed configuration of your Compiz setup. See the Sneak Peek for a detailed look at Compiz Fusion on openSUSE 11.0.

Firefox 3.0

Firefox is one of the most popular open source applications on the planet, and the openSUSE desktop just wouldn’t be complete without Mozilla Firefox. The 3.0 release has a number of new features and improvements that will make browsing the Web on openSUSE convenient and safe, including better site identification features, simplified add-on installation and management, detection of “phishing” sites, the ability to save tabs on exit, better download manager, and a new page zoom feature that lets you zoom text or the entire page.

Note that openSUSE 11.0 ships with Firefox 3.0 beta 5, and updates to the final 3.0 release will be available through online update.

Firefox 3.0

Banshee 1.0

openSUSE 11.0 includes Banshee 1.0. The Banshee media player has been re-written to improve performance and includes many new features, including video playback, better “shuffle” playback, support for iPods, MTP devices, and mass storage player devices, and support for podcasts and better Last.fm integration.

Banshee 1.0

OpenOffice.org 2.4

You can work hard and play hard with openSUSE. If you need a high-quality office suite that’s Microsoft Office compatible, look no further than Novell’s OpenOffice.org 2.4. This release includes import support for OpenXML, 3-D transitions in Impress, SVG import support, improved performance over standard OpenOffice.org, and better Excel support and VBA macro support.

NetworkManager 0.7

NetworkManager has been vastly improved since 10.3, and now includes support for multiple network interfaces and UTMS and EV-DO cards.

Under the Hood

  • Linux kernel 2.6.25
  • glibc 2.8
  • GCC 4.3

Media and Download


openSUSE is now available for immediate download. The openSUSE 11.0 release brings several new options for installation media, as well as familiar choices:

  • openSUSE 11.0 DVD 32-bit
  • openSUSE 11.0 DVD 64-bit
  • openSUSE 11.0 KDE 4 32-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.0 GNOME 32-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.0 KDE 4 64-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.0 GNOME 64-bit Live CD

You can download openSUSE 11.0 via HTTP, FTP, BitTorrent, and Metalink from software.openSUSE.org.

You can also purchase a retail box with openSUSE 11.0 that includes 90-day installation support, physical media, and a printed Getting Started guide.

Communicate


We want to hear from you! The openSUSE Project has many channels of communication:

To keep up to date with openSUSE, be sure to keep an eye on openSUSE News and watch Planet SUSE for blog posts from the openSUSE community.

Want to help the openSUSE Project? To get involved with openSUSE see the How to Participate page on the openSUSE wiki. We can use lots of different skills to help the project, so feel free to jump in!

All of the contributors who have worked on openSUSE deserve a huge thank you. Without your hard work, this release would not have been possible. openSUSE 11.0 is the best openSUSE release yet, and will help promote the use of Linux everywhere! Now, get openSUSE 11.0 and have a lot of fun!

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0: Talking GNOME with Vincent Untz

June 18th, 2008 by

Just a few hours before openSUSE 11.0 is officially released! Here we’ll take a look at GNOME in openSUSE 11.0, and talk to Vincent Untz, openSUSE developer and a member of the GNOME Foundation Board.

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Banshee 1.0 Released!

June 10th, 2008 by

The Banshee team has released version 1.0! This release will be found in openSUSE 11.0, and includes tons of new features and improvements over the previous Banshee releases. This is a ground-up rewrite that improves speed, a redesigned interface, better integration with Last.fm, and video management!

See the entire release announcement on the Banshee homepage, including screenshots and a full list of new and notable features.If you’d like to help spread the news, please use this Digg link to vote it up.

The Banshee team includes openSUSE contributors Aaron Bockover, Gabriel Burt, and James Willcox.