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What’s up on KDE repositories

April 4th, 2014 by

Dear KDE Users,

Maybe you have heard already about it from another openSUSE mailing list, a blog post or through our openSUSE community page on Google+, but the KDE repositories have been changed since last Tuesday. Below you will find the changes that were done based on the release of KDE 4.12.4.

Why was this changes needed

Based on a small discussion in the opensuse-kde mailinglist and feedback on our survey, we concluded that the majority is in favor of creating a single repository where we track the current KDE release.

Where are my old KDE repositories

The name for this repository will be KDE:Current and will initially be build for oS 12.3 and oS 13.1.

After the release of the KDE:Current repo, the repositories KDE:Release:XY have been cleaned and removed. Initially KDE:Current will be delivered with 4.12.4 as that the KDE 4.13 release is scheduled for mid April.

Also the repository KDE:Extra and KDE:Unstable:Extra will change as that some of the building targets (KDE:Release:XY) are disappearing and be replaced with KDE:Current.

Where should I find the new KDE repositories

The KDE Repository page KDE repositories has been updated to reflect the changes. We would like to ask those that have been working on the localization of this page in other languages, to
update their pages as well.

Regards,

Raymond

openSUSE Kicks Off Development with Milestone 1

May 17th, 2013 by

13.1-Milestone1
openSUSE is pleased to announce that the newest Milestone for the upcoming version of openSUSE 13.1. is available for testing. As early version, it is expected that this Milestone is not fully functional or very stable and we welcome bug reports and fixes for the issues. This is the first in a series of upcoming updates to the distribution that will end with the final release of 13.1 projected by November of 2013. As usual with an alpha release, the most prominent changes in openSUSE 13.1 Milestone 1 come from the upgrades that packages are going through.

Major updates

Some major updates below:

  • GNOME 3.6 > 3.8.1
  • apache2 2.2.22 > 2.4.3
  • digikam 3.0.0 > 3.1.0
  • giflib 4.1.6 > 5.0.3
  • icecream 0.9.7 > 1.0.0
  • kernel 3.7.10 > 3.9.0
  • libreoffice 3.6.3.2.4 > 4.0.2.2.1
  • ocaml 3.12.1 > 4.00.1
  • qemu 1.3.0 > 1.4.0
  • qt-creator 2.6.2 > 2.7.0
  • ruby 1.9.3 > 2.0
  • systemd 195 > 202
  • wpa_supplicant 1.1 > 2.0
  • xorg-x11-server 1.13.2 > 1.14.1

Most Annoying Bugs

The list of most annoying bugs is still short. We’re looking towards you to help us make that list bigger! We need to find out what’s wrong so we can fix it. You can report bugs with this link. The process of reporting bugs involves a couple of steps that you can take in order to contribute with the distribution. Reporting bugs and problems with the packages is essential for openSUSE to retain its stability. Please review our sections on how to contribute to factory, and submitting bug reports.

You’re more than welcome to organize some bug-finding-and-squashing sessions! Take a look at previous efforts in our last beta-pizza-party!

Planned Changes

Some time ago, the team posted a suggested list of changes for openSUSE 13.1. The idea behind this is to accept the changes provided by the community and at the same time meet specific team goals. Please keep in mind that this list is subject to change but it helps when understanding where the next release of openSUSE would like to go.

For the base system, planned changes include updating GCC to version 4.8 and working on the latest integrations for the Linux Kernel. On booting there was a discussion looking to completely move to SYSTEMD and dropping SYSVINIT. Replacing MKINITRD with Dracut.

On the KDE environment the planned list includes making PHONON support GSTREAMER 1.0 and replacing Kopete, largely unmaintained now, to KDE Telepathy. Gnome is also looking to change a few things in 13.1 starting by adding Gnome 3.10, cleaning out some outdated libraries and changing its default theme to a greener one.

On security the list is simple so far, AppArmor will be promoted further as a preferred security suite and updating SELinux.

Get involved!

This list of possible changes can also be altered by your participation. If you are a developer looking to learn and participate of the openSUSE project through coding, packaging or coordinating efforts to include certain software on the distribution, go to our factory page and learn more about how to contribute code. The process of working packages into the factory release is also documented in an article for the release of openSUSE 12.3. If you are interested in making contributions for packages, please go here and get packaging! Although the link is for 12.3, keep in mind that the packaging process done on 13.1 is the same. If your are familiar with branching projects through GIT, making contributions to the factory development should be easy for you. In simple words, you access the openSUSE repository, branch the specific part you would like to work on, make the appropriate updates and then you make requests to our team to include your changes.

However, the work on openSUSE is not only belonging or limited to packaging. There is far more that can be done here. Marketing, team coordination, translation, artwork, etc. These are simple examples of what more of you could be doing for the team. If you are willing to participate, take a look at this page and choose!

Schedule

Master Coolo published a simple road map. The next milestone is expected for 6 of June, 2013. the next milestones come with about a month in between, Beta 1 is planned for the 19th of September, RC one will be on October 10 and RC2 on October 31st.

Sneak Peek: openSUSE 12.2 and KDE

September 4th, 2012 by

openSUSE comes with the 4.8 series of the KDE workspaces, applications and platform. This release, as you can read in the announcements is mostly focused on improving the user experience.

Starting up

booting opensuse_small Booting up openSUSE, you notice the nice new splash screen as well as the short boot times, courtesy of Plymouth and an improved systemd. But you’ll notice speed everywhere: this openSUSE release ships with Linux 3.4.6, a kernel release with a nice number of improvements to the storage layer. Moreover, openSUSE is build with GCC 4.7 and glibc 2.15, bringing speedups all over the system. You’ll notice this especially in the performance of low-level tools like the command line and GUI versions of zypper, our package manager. Especially relevant for the desktop is the inclusion of Qt 4.8.1 which makes your applications noticeably more responsive. The version of KWin part of KDE 4.8 comes with its own share of optimizations, with much more efficient painting. In short, boot up in openSUSE 12.2 and feel the speed! (more…)

Forum Users Benefit from openSUSE KDE Repository

September 12th, 2010 by

Without question, users who frequent the openSUSE forums are very appreciative of all the work being done by ALL the various development teams. The progressive nature of KDE4 continues to spark a great deal of interest generally, though especially do users want options to try the latest and greatest, yet at the same time maintain a level of stability. With KDE development moving so quickly between distribution releases, users don’t want to be stuck with the distro release version of KDE. The much requested 4.5.* stable repo has now been provided for openSUSE 11.3 users. Those currently using the Factory repo will now be able to switch to:
http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/KDE:/Release:/45/openSUSE_11.3/

A great shout of praise must go out to all those involved in making this repository possible.

KDE bug team asks for help on Friday 13th

August 11th, 2010 by

Javier sent us the following announcement:

It’s my pleasure to announce the next KDE Bug triage :-)

It will begin next Friday (13th) and end on Monday (16th).

The aim of this bug triage is to help make KDE a bit better. You don’t need to have any special skills. The most important thing is that you’re interested in helping us to clean the bug list so developers can focus on fixing the bugs!

So, let’s squash bugs together! Join us in the #opensuse-kde IRC channel on Freenode :-)

For more info on bug squashing KDE, take a look here!

To see a list of open bugs is here (automatically generated).

Happy KDE bug squashing!

Attention All KDE Users

February 16th, 2010 by

KDE SC 4.3.5 is about to become available for openSUSE 11.2 as an online update (from 4.3.1). This release fixes many bugs, so we decided to push it as an online update instead of making it an optional update in the Build Service, and by fixing bugs we give our KDE contributors more time to work for openSUSE 11.3.

This makes the Build Service KDE:43 repository redundant, so it is being removed. KDE:43 users should remove this repository from their installation sources.

For more details and information on how to use other KDE versions on all supported openSUSE editions, see KDE Repositories.

Edit: KDE 4.3 users on older versions of openSUSE are not being left out in the rain.  KDE:KDE4:STABLE:Desktop contains the same KDE SC 4.3.5 that was added to openSUSE 11.2.

Meet The KDE Plasma Developers at SUSE, Feb 22

February 11th, 2010 by

On the evening of Monday the 22nd of February, the KDE Plasma, KWin and Oxygen developers will be holding a public event at the SUSE office in Nuremberg, Germany. All are welcome to come to the openSUSE Community Space to hear the KDE hackers present their vision of the state of the art in user interfaces.

This evening forms part of the 4th Plasma coding sprint, codenamed ‘Tokamak4‘. Sponsored by KDE e.V. and Novell, twenty-five leading KDE developers will be coming together from all over the world to work on the Plasma Desktop for future versions of KDE Workspaces, including the desktop and netbook shells, the window manager, and the desktop look and feel. With KDE SC 4.4 still burning up broadband lines and download mirrors everywhere, the developers are moving on to address important challenges for the next release, including empowering Plasma with semantic technologies, easier extensions using JavaScript and other scripting languages, enhancing mobile devices with Plasma interfaces, and enriching the desktop with more Web content from Project Silk.

For many years, there has been close cooperation between SUSE and upstream desktop projects. For KDE, this has resulted in the Kiosk lockdown framework, the love-it-or-hate-it Kickoff application launcher, usability testing and more recently the openSUSE Air theming for 11.2, KNetworkManager and integration with Firefox and OpenOffice.

The doors open to the public at 1800 in the openSUSE Community Space, Maxtorhof, Maxfeldstr 5, 90409 Nuernberg. If you’re planning to attend, it would be much appreciated if you can let Will Stephenson know in advance – but feel free to come along spontaneously.

KDE Plasma Desktop

KDE Plasma Desktop

openSUSE Build Service Integrates with openDesktop.org to reach 150,000 contributors

December 17th, 2009 by

Today Frank Karlitschek, maintainer of the openDesktop.org network, announced that the first step of integration with openDesktop.org is complete. Effective immediately, developers can add their Build Service ID to projects on openDesktop.org, and all packages available from the openSUSE Build Service will automatically show up on the openDesktop.org pages.

The openDesktop.org sites include openDesktop.org, KDE-Apps.org, GNOME-Apps.org, KDE-Look.org, and GNOME-Look.org. The openDesktop.org network reaches more than 150,000 registered contributors, and has more than 90 million page views per month from 2 million unique visitors. This is an excellent opportunity for the openSUSE Build Service to reach a much wider audience and deliver on the goal of providing packages for all major Linux distributions.

The integration solves a problem for openDesktop.org users in that applications on openDesktop.org are often available only as source or binaries for a limited number of Linux distributions. We want to worktogether with openDesktop.org and other organizations to make the openSUSE Build Service a tool to build and provide packages for all major Linux distributions.

The work between openDesktop.org and the openSUSE Project has been in progress for several months. Plans are also in the works to allow upload directly from Qt-Create or KDevelop to the openSUSE Build Service and KDE-Apps.org.

openSUSE 11.2 Released!

November 12th, 2009 by

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the release of openSUSE 11.2.  openSUSE 11.2 includes new versions of GNOME, KDE, OpenOffice.org, Firefox, the Linux kernel, and many, many more updates and improvements. In 11.2 you’ll find more than 1,000 open source desktop applications. openSUSE also includes a full suite of server software and a rich selection of open source development tools.

You can find a bevy of screenshots and more on the openSUSE wiki, and a lengthy list of packages and version numbers on DistroWatch.

Let’s take a look at some of the more interesting features of openSUSE 11.2!

openSUSE Desktop

As always, openSUSE provides everything you need to get started with Linux on the desktop.

openSUSE 11.2 includes KDE 4.3 as the “default” desktop. If you install from DVD without changing anything, you’ll have the KDE desktop by default. However, we still provide GNOME as an equal choice, and Xfce and other window managers as alternative desktops too!

KDE 4.3 is a major update to the KDE platform. It includes improved networking support, and work to make Firefox and OpenOffice.org better integrated with the KDE enviroment. The openSUSE Project also worked closely with the KDE Project on theming and branding to provide a look and feel that meshes both projects nicely.

You’ll also find plenty of GNOME greatness in openSUSE 11.2 as well. GNOME 2.28, the latest release of the popular GNOME desktop, is included with 11.2. This release includes a brand new theme, improved software update application, improvements in GNOME’s Webcam and video application, and many other enhancements and improvements to prepare the GNOME platform for GNOME 3.0 in 2010.

OpenOffice.org 3.1 is a complete office productivity suite compatible with Microsoft Office. This release includes improvements in change tracking and collaboration in Writer, and major improvements to the drawing application.

Social networking gets a boost in 11.2 with the addition of GNOME and KDE microblogging clients that handle multiple social network sites, Gwibber, and Choqok.

With openSUSE 11.2, you have the ability to install GNOME or KDE live media from USB, and numerous improvements to make openSUSE 11.2 much better on netbooks.

Under the Hood

The desktop improvements are the most noticeable, but there’s plenty going on under the hood as well in openSUSE 11.2.

Storage improvements include the ability to encrypt the entire hard disk, for users concerned about data security. Users can also take advantage of the next generation of filesystems for Linux with Ext4 or btrfs. In case you’d like to learn more about the new kernel features you can go at KernelNewbies.org and have a look at the “cool stuff” part.

Want to manage remote openSUSE servers with a Web interface? That day is coming soon! openSUSE 11.2 users can install the first technology preview of WebYaST: a Web-based remote administration tool for openSUSE systems.

Finally, you can upgrade in-place using Zypper! Though it’s been possible to do an upgrade in place for some time, with caution, it’s finally a “recommended” method of upgrade with openSUSE 11.2. For users who want to move from 11.1 to 11.2 using “zypper dup,” see Andreas Jaeger’s post on Lizards about the process. It’s quick, it’s easy, and almost competely painless.

Linux for Education

The openSUSE Build Service provides thousands of applications as 1-click packages to enhance your experience on openSUSE 11.2. The openSUSE Education Community provides hundreds of Educational applications suitable for students of all ages, parents, teachers and IT administrators of educational institutions via the Build Service.

The 11.2 release will be followed closely by a very special spin, Li-f-e: Linux for Education. Li-f-e contains GNOME, KDE as well the the award-winning Sugar learning environment for children. With packages from the Packman repository, Li-f-e provides everything required to get rich multimedia experience too.

Media and Download

openSUSE is now available for immediate download! You have several choices of installation media and live CDs (which are also installable).

  • openSUSE 11.2 Installable DVD 32-bit
  • openSUSE 11.2 Installable DVD 64-bit
  • openSUSE 11.2 GNOME 32-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 GNOME 64-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 KDE 32-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 KDE 64-bit Live CD

Booting openSUSE 11.2 from a USB key: get one of the Live CDs available above, and can copy it to a USB key with the following command:

dd if=image.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=4M

Replace “image.iso” with the name of the ISO image that you have downloaded, and replace “sdX” with the actual device name of your USB drive. Be careful! This will erase the target device, so make sure you have the correct device name and have any vital data backed up!

We want to hear from you!

The openSUSE Project has many channels of communication! Whether you prefer forums, email, or IRC, there are plenty of ways to communicate about openSUSE.

To keep up to date with openSUSE, be sure to keep an eye on openSUSE News and watch Planet SUSE for blog posts from the openSUSE community. We also update the @opensuse account on Twitter and Identi.ca regularly with news about the project.

Want to help the openSUSE Project? To get involved with openSUSE see the How to Participate page on the openSUSE wiki. We can use lots of different skills to help the project, so feel free to jump in!

Thanks!

openSUSE 11.2 represents the combined effort of hundreds of developers who participate in openSUSE, and thousands of developers in upstream projects that are shipped in openSUSE. The contributors, inside and outside the openSUSE Project, should be proud of this release, and they deserve a major “thank you” for all of the hard work and care that have gone into 11.2.

When we say “contributor,” we don’t mean only developers and packagers. This includes translators, openSUSE Ambassadors, the openSUSE Board, and the users who help power our forums and support users who are taking their first steps into Linux.

We are confident that openSUSE 11.2 is the best openSUSE release yet, and that it will help to encourage the use of Linux everywhere! We hope that you have a lot of fun while you use openSUSE 11.2!

Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.2: KDE 4.3 Experience, with Luboš Luňák

October 27th, 2009 by

The KDE 4 experience in openSUSE has been enhanced daily, and while the desktop environment itself has matured significantly since the last release, there has been a constant focus to provide an outstanding delivery of it in openSUSE 11.2.

The highlights include: the openSUSE DVD preselected to KDE 4.3; new Firefox KDE integration; OpenOffice.org KDE 4 integration; consistent KDE artwork; all other standard applications fully ported to KDE 4, including KNetworkManager, Amarok, DigiKam, K3b, Konversation and more.

We will also be talking to openSUSE and KDE core developer Luboš Luňák, to find out more about the developments in KDE 4.3, where the project is concentrating its efforts, and what the openSUSE boosters team is really all about. Read on for the full story… (more…)