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What to expect from Btrfs on openSUSE 13.2?

November 12th, 2014 by

As the first major Linux distribution to have Btrfs as the default file system, what can users and developers expect from openSUSE 13.2?

How is the systems capabilities enhanced?

Btrfs has different performance characteristics; it’s a logging-style file system that provides fault tolerance, repair, and easy management features.

The most well known advantage of Btrfs is the rollback capability with the open-source tool Snapper.

“Btrfs is mature,” said George Shi, who helped rollbacks become a reality for openSUSE users. “It works with Snapper to implement snapshot and rollback, the killer function of Btrfs. You can pick any date you saved to rollback your full system.”

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Tumbleweed, Factory rolling releases to merge

October 24th, 2014 by

With the release of openSUSE 13.2 in November, two of openSUSE’s open-source projects, the ‘Tumbleweed’ and ‘Factory’ rolling releases will be merging, and offered as a single openSUSE rolling release under the name ‘Tumbleweed’

Factory will remain the name of the development process where openSUSE’s new developments are integrated, with the tested, user-ready rolling release assuming the name Tumbleweed from Nov. 4.

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The first openSUSE Asia Summit is announced…

July 14th, 2014 by

The first ever openSUSE Summit in Asia will take place in Beihang University, Beijing on October 18th and 19th, 2014. We aim to promote the use of openSUSE and other free open source software in the region. We will have a series of talks, discussions and workshops that will induct people into the openSUSE Project. The goal of the Summit is to provide a platform for everyone to understand openSUSE so that it becomes easier to use and contribute to it. It is also a great opportunity for openSUSE contributors and users from all over Asia who have only been interacting online with each other so far, to meet face to face. And to learn about various free and open technologies, sharing experiences with each other and having a lot of fun.

So what are you waiting for? Come join us in beautiful Bejing!

Bejing Skyline

Bejing Skyline by Michael McDonough. CC-BY-NC-SA 2.0

Command Line Tuesdays – The Introductory

May 27th, 2014 by

Hi Geekos!

Today we’re introducing a new series, called ‘Command Line Tuesdays‘. Why command line Tuesdays? Because in this series, everyday computer enthusiasts like yours truly, will try to step a little out of bounds of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) Culture, which is today synonymous to ‘making stuff easier for the masses‘.

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Gnome Classic edition of openSUSE-Education

May 22nd, 2014 by

If you have fun, the rest is easy…

Classic main menu The openSUSE-Education team is proud to announce the availability of another great release: the GNOME classic edition.

This one is nearly identical to the MATE desktop, but already includes a few minor bug fixes and some additional applications:

are added to the (already huge) list of available applications.

Quoting Jigish Gohil:

classic is so much better than standard gnome  i wonder why it is not standard

BTW: openSUSE Education releases always contain the latest official openSUSE updates and other cool stuff, so you should be able to get an up-to date live system up and running in a few seconds/minutes (depending on your hardware) – which can also be installed on your local hard disk with just a few mouse clicks. Just click on the “Live-Install” icon on the desktop.

Get Li-f-e GNOME Classic edition from here: direct Download | md5sum | Alternate download and mirrors

You want to join the team? Just ping us at #opensuse-education. We are hiring community members to help out on web work and marketing (be warned: we currently pay in honor and fun).

openSUSE Edu Li-f-e MATE available

May 19th, 2014 by

The openSUSE-Education team is proud to present a special, 64-bit edition of openSUSE Edu Li-f-e with the MATE desktop environment.

Li-f-e MATE desktop

Li-f-e MATE edition came about to support schools in Gujarat, India, they needed synfig studio: a very simple to use C and Java IDE, apart from standard fare of complete office suite and other applications. Gujarat now starts teaching open(libre)office in 9th grade, and Linux operating system all the way to shell scripting in 10th, and Java, C, HTML, Javascript etc in 11th and 12 grades. This Li-f-e edition tries to get everything they need in an integrated bundle which they can use on a stand alone PC or set up LTSP server to PXE boot their entire lab without having to modify their existing setup on the client PC side.

The MATE desktop was choosen as default desktop manager as it looks close to the pictures in their textbook, however latest GNOME desktop is also available at the login screen. MATE is well known for being a traditional desktop environment, a fork of the classic GNOME 2 session. It uses a two-panel layout and darkish theme, as well as a neat collection of educational apps, such as gElemental, Scilab, Xcos, Scinotes, Geany, Inkscape, Synfig Studio, Bluefish, Epoptes, and LTSP.

Default applications include the Pidgin multi-protocol instant messenger, Mozilla Firefox web browser, GIMP image editor, pluma text editor, VLC Media Player, as well as the entire LibreOffice office suite.

Download the operating system as a Live DVD ISO image that must be burned onto a DVD discs or written on a USB flash drive in order to boot it from the BIOS of the PC.

As with all openSUSE-Education releases, we based on the recently released openSUSE (13.1) with all the official online updates applied.

Get Li-f-e MATE from here: direct Download | md5sum | Alternate download and mirrors

Quoting Marius Nestor on softpedia.com :

openSUSE Edu Li-f-e MATE is a surprise addition to the educational edition of the award winning and widely used openSUSE Linux operating system. The MATE desktop environment will provide for a faster working environment suitable for classroom use.

oSC 2014 3rd – 4th Day

April 28th, 2014 by

oSC14 Group photoGeekos gathered at beautiful Dubrovnik in Croatia for their annual meetup. They drunk, they conversed and they shared knowledge and progress of the project. They had fun! The openSUSE Conference’s final day and reporting is now detailed below. “The strength to change” was the moto of this conference and it served well its purpose. Many people found their strength and enthusiasm and started contributing to the project. We encourage you to participate. We welcome everyone interested in contributing to an awesome project. (more…)

oSC 2014 1st Day

April 25th, 2014 by

The openSUSE Conference 2014 is being held in Dubrovnik, on the Dalmatian coast in Croatia. The conference venue, also known as the Campus of the University of Dubrovnik is set and ready to accommodate all the Geekos that will visit the conference from around the world. Everyone is happy and delighted about this conference.

Read more about this awesome first day!

(more…)

News from your openSUSE admins

April 12th, 2014 by

Heartbleed and openSUSE infrastructureHeartbleed Logo

As people started to ask, we checked all openSUSE servers and can confirm that none of them is affected by the heartbleed bug.

For those users running openSUSE 12.2 and 13.1, we can just repeat what we always pray: please install the latest official updates provided by our glorious maintenance team.

RSYNC and rsync.opensuse.org

The server behind rsync.opensuse.org is re-installed now and already providing packages via HTTP again.

But we faced an issue with the automation that creates the content of the “hotstuff” rsync modules: normally a script analyzes the log files of download.opensuse.org and arranges the content of these special rsync modules to provide always the most requested files, so our users have a good chance to find a very close mirror for their packages. But currently the script is not producing what we expect: it empties all those hotstuff modules. As the core developer behind this script comes back from vacation on Monday, we hope he can quickly fix the problem. For now we disabled the “hotstuff” modules (means on rsync.opensuse.org: we disabled rsync completely for now) to avoid problems.

If you want to sync packages to your local machine(s) via rsync: please pick a mirror from our page at mirrors.opensuse.org providing public rsync.

New hardware

All the racks of the OBS reference server

All the racks of the OBS reference server

You may have noticed already that the openSUSE team installed a new version of openQA on the production server. An additional news item might be that this new version has seen also new hardware to run faster than ever.

But not only openQA, also the database cluster behind download.opensuse.org has seen a hardware upgrade. The new servers allow to run the database servers as virtual machines, able to have the whole database structure stored in RAM (you hopefully benefit from the faster response times on download.opensuse.org already). And the servers still have enough capacity left, so we can now also visualize the web servers providing the download.opensuse.org interface. We are currently thinking about the detailed setup of the new download.opensuse.org system (maybe using ha-proxy here again? maybe running mirrorbrain in the “no local storage” mode? …) – so this migration might take some more time, but we want to provide the best possible solution to you.

Admins on openSUSE Conference

These year, three of our main European openSUSE administrators are able to attend to the openSUSE Conference in Dubrovnik:Geekocamp

  • Markus Rückert
  • Martin Caj
  • Robert Wawrig

And they will not only participate: instead they are providing talks and help with the infrastructure and video recording of the venue. So whenever you see them: time to spend them a drink or two :-)

 

 

 

 

openSUSE participates in GSoC 2014

March 4th, 2014 by

GSoC 2014: First Steps

openSUSE is part of yet another Google Summer of Code. After a rocking ride in last year’s edition, our Geeko’s are gearing up for another awesome program. This year promises to be more special, as Google is celebrating its 10th anniversary of the program.

About the Program:

Google Summer of Code (commonly called as GSoC) is an annual program conducted by Google which pays students code to write code for open source organizations. It is one of the most best ways for organizations such as openSUSE to get some quality work done, and gain long term contributors. In the last edition, we had 10 students complete their projects and gain recognition within the community.

openSUSE and GSoC:

Last year, we collaborated with ownCloud, Balabit(makers of syslog-ng) and Hedgewars under a common umbrella. It worked very well for all of us. This year, we are collaborating with ownCloud, Zorp(a Gateway technology by Balabit) and the MATE desktop along with the bucket load of awesome projects from openSUSE itself. Our mentors are quite enthusiastic, and recognize the role played by GSoC in moving the community forward.

For Students:

If you are a student who wants to participate under openSUSE, and ‘have a lot of fun’, do check out our ideas page and guidelines. As always, the key is to start early and to interact with mentors and the community at large. Fixing bugs and working on Proof of Concepts is a good way to start.

Student application period opens on 10th March, and continues till March 21.

Contact:

You can find out all about our GSoC programme on the wiki or contact the GSoC team for further questions
Manu Gupta
Saurabh Sood

You can reach the community at our Mailing List and on #opensuse-project on IRC (Freenode).

This article has been contributed by Saurabh Sood