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Archive for February, 2016

Organizing Team seeks input for planning conference

February 29th, 2016 by

oscfinalPlanning for the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg is moving along well.

Each day brings more progress toward having a successful conference and this year the Organizing Team for oSC16 is looking for your input to make this year’s conference one to remember.

The Organizing Team has planned a pre-conference party in Nuremberg on June 21 at the Kater Murr. More details about the pre-conference party will become available in the next few weeks.

Besides that event, there are many things to do in Nuremberg and we need your opinion about what you might be interesting in doing when the conference is not taking place. From Go Karting to beer tasting, Nuremberg offers several choices for entertainment before, during and after the event. The more information attendees share about the things they would like to do at oSC16, the Organizing Team will be better able to plan group discounts and other items for the event.

Please take the time to answer the survey questions.

Two other entertainment options not list are a car race that will take place from June 24 – 26 in Nuremberg and a 90-minute Segway tour through the city.

New workers get Tumbleweed rolling

February 25th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenopenQA workers that keep Tumbleweed tested and rolling have almost been replenished.

The new hardware can run more workers and is newer, bigger and faster, which increases the speed of openQA testing. One of two Intel E5-2630 v3 is partially running while the other has yet to be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure. Each machine has 8 cores with 16 threads for a total of 16 cores of 32 threads when both machines become fully functional. The new hardware has each have 256GB of RAM and 400GB Intel NVMe SSDs.

SUSE’s infrastructure team was really helpful in getting the new machine working with openSUSE infrastructure and deserve a lot of credit for their efforts. Thank you SUSE.

The latest, full-testing went through in six hours as opposed to the normal 14 hour duration. That, plus the additional workers currently running greatly increase openQA’s speed.

Since the last update, which informed readers about openQA workers (hardware) that went down, openSUSE Tumbleweed has released three snapshots.

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openSUSE T-Shirts for Leap Day

February 24th, 2016 by

To celebrate Leap Day, openSUSE will ship you a Leap 42 T-Shirt when you submit a proposal for this year’s openSUSE Conference by Leap Day (Feb. 29, 2016). *Due to a technical problem with OSEM, the deadline for the T-Shirt offering is extended until March 1.

That’s right, if you have already submitted a proposal, you’re in luck. Anyone who submits a proposal on or before Leap Day 2016 for the openSUSE Conference will get an openSUSE Leap 42 T-Shirt; it can be either shipped to them or picked up at the conference. After you submit your proposal, don’t forget to register for the conference. There is a section in the registration that allows you to select your T-Shirt size. Those you who have registered can update the registration to select your size T-Shirt. Contact ddemaio@suse.de if you need your T-Shirt shipped to you.

This year’s openSUSE Conference will also include a SaltStack Summit, Kolab Summit, SUSE Labs Summit and OwnCloud Summit, and it will be a conference you will not want to miss.

T-Shirt Design Contest

There is more than just the Leap 42 T-Shirt. Between Leap Day and April 2, 2016, there will be a T-Shirt Design Contest for the openSUSE Conference.

We are calling on the talent and creativity of the Open Source community to create a T-Shirt design for oSC16. The images of the T-Shirt designs should be uploaded to the wiki and linked to the “Submit your designs” section of the wiki page.

The Organizing Team for oSC16 will select the winning design on April 5, 2016. The winner of the T-Shirt design contest will receive a T-Shirt in the mail.

openSUSE offers choices for KDE Git builds

February 19th, 2016 by

Diagram without qa obs sleGravitational waves might be the cause of two new live image, spin off projects released today by members of the openSUSE community.

The release of Argon, which is a live installable image based on openSUSE Leap, and Krypton, which is a live installable image based on openSUSE Tumbleweed, offer packages built for KDE Git using stable and tested openSUSE technologies to track the latest development state of KDE software.

Users have a choice on how they get up-to-date packages of Qt and other additional cutting-edge offerings from KDE through the Argon and Krypton live installable images, built directly from the latest sources in KDE git through the Open Build Service.

Argon and Krypton can be either used as live images, without changing an already installed system, or they can be installed, providing a full-stack KDE software environment.

This will allow developers, early testers and enthusiast adopters to experience the latest happenings in KDE software development, while at the same time being able to report bugs and improve the software before a stable release lands.

openSUSE’s Argon and Krypton become the first to offer a continuous stream of KDE software updates by putting the Git builds in the hands of users the way KDE intends it.

openSUSE has an extensive experience in providing almost-daily Git snapshots of KDE software: the Unstable OBS repositories have been running without issues for several years.

Thanks to this expertise, creating Argon and Krypton from Git snapshot is a rather simple endeavor, facilitated by the infrastructure provided by the openSUSE Project.

There are three KDE repositories used for Argon and Krypton, which can be found on the Wiki. They are:

KDE:Unstable:Frameworks

KDE:Unstable:Applications

KDE:Unstable:Extra.

Packages are directly based on the Git repositories and not on any alpha, beta tarballs. These packages are refreshed at least daily.

argon

http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/KDE:/Medias/images/iso/

The below build numbers will change based on rebuilds.

http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/KDE:/Medias/images/iso/openSUSE_Argon.x86_64-5.5.90-Build14.2.iso

 

krypton

http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/KDE:/Medias/images/iso/

The below build numbers will change based on rebuilds.

http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/KDE:/Medias/images/iso/openSUSE_Krypton.i686-5.5.90-Build22.2.iso

http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/KDE:/Medias/images/iso/openSUSE_Krypton.x86_64-5.5.90-Build22.2.iso

GNOME Next

GNOME – Next, which is similar but different than Argon and Krypton, is based on tarballs. GNOME – Next is from the unstable branch of GNOME, currently 3.19.x, but will soon be 3.21.x. For that repo to work, occasionally it reaches beyond GNOME packages with libinput and various hardware libraries to build.

http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/GNOME:/Medias/images/iso/?P=GNOME_Next*

openSUSE Conference returns to Nuremberg

February 18th, 2016 by

oscfinalThe openSUSE Conference will return to Nuremberg June 22 – 26 and have its conference at a cultural center in the heart of the Bavarian city.

This year’s oSC will take place at the Z Bau, which was a former military barracks before being converted into a cultural center in 2014.

Planning is taking place for a social event the date before the conference begins on June 21. The conference will run from June 22 – 26 and June 26 will be a half-day program ending the conference at 2 p.m.

The venue for this year’s oSC offers several rooms for hacking, socializing and learning new things about Open Source software. System administrators, developers, Information Technology managers, startups, IT students and professors are expected to attend this year’s conference, which will include a SaltStack Summit, OwnCloud Summit, SUSE Labs Summit and a Kolab Summit.

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Tumbleweed waits for workers

February 17th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenopenSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed goes through automated tests before a snapshot is released and heavily relies on openQA for the process of Tumbleweed to create regular snapshots.

The last snapshot was 20160209, which produced new grub2, python, YaST and GTK3 packages.

The automated testing of openQA is currently running with only two workers left instead of the usual 10. The remaining workers are largely overloaded and can’t cope with the workload to produce new snapshots.

Various solutions are being evaluated to get new workers for openQA, which includes borrowing machines from other SUSE owned instances. Thank you SUSE!

The team has opted to hold back creating new snapshots until more workers for openQA become available. Once the team resumes with staging, testing and releasing, which is expected for a 20160217+ snapshot, Tumbleweed fans can expect updates to Firewalld, CMake 3.4.3, GStreamer 1.6.3 and Plasma 5.5.4.

Systemd updates, ambitious YaST changes in Tumbleweed

February 10th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenTumbleweed updated systemd from 224 to 228 in one of four snapshots this week and there were plenty of other exciting updates.

The change log for the updated systemd states a number of properties previously only settable in unit files are now also available as properties to set when creating transient units programmatically via the bus.

Screenshot from 2016-02-10 11-45-32

GCC 5 updated to 5.3.1 in the most recent snapshot, 20160208. The update of GCC 5 will raise more errors, yet creates more consistent behavior.

Mozilla Firefox updated to 44.0 in the same snapshot and has updates to assist with spoofing attacks, unsafe memory manipulation found through code inspect and allows for control characters to be set in cookie names.

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New openSUSE Board Elected

February 3rd, 2016 by

The campaign is over; the votes are counted and three members of the openSUSE community will lead the overall project on the openSUSE Board.

Tomáš Chvátal, Gertjan Lettink, and Bryan Lunduke take the helm with the existing board members of Michal Hrušecký, Kostas Koudaras and chairman Richard Brown.

The new board members each bring different experiences and cultural backgrounds, which will no doubt provide for an exchange of ideas in fulfilling their role of representing the community and the project. The new members are from the Czech Republic, Netherlands and United States, respectively.

Manu Gupta and Efstathios Iosifidis, who ran in this year’s elections, received several votes. Both are great members of the community and will have a chance to run in next year’s elections.

Many thanks to the departing board members Andrew Wafaa, Robert Schweikert and Bruno Friedmann; your efforts and time on the board are valued.

The project can not exist without its members and board, which represent the community. The board helps to resolve conflicts, facilitates decision making processes when needed and communicates with the community and project stakeholders. And yes, like the picture above suggests, occasionally slap each other in the face.

Those who make the decision to volunteer their time and efforts toward representing the project are greatly appreciated. Thank you to all future, past and present board members. Congratulations.