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Archive for April, 2017

Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages

April 27th, 2017 by

openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts.

Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.

Besides the google-croscore-fonts in snapshots 20170424, users can get a fix for the CD/DVD burning software Brasero, which provided a patch for Grub2 that fixes builds with the GNU Composite Compilers, and kdebase4-workspace offers a diff to fix an error reported by GCC7, which should be helpful as Tumbleweed works closer to adapt the newest GCC. The snapshot also delivered a patch for VirtualBox that will provide an eventual Application Programming Interface change for the release of Leap 42.3. (more…)

Samba, Ceph, LightDM Update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

April 20th, 2017 by

Snapshots released the past two weeks of openSUSE Tumbleweed have slowed down a bit, but new software continues to be updated in the five snapshots that have been release since April 6.

The most recent snapshot, 20170417, brought Samba 4.6.2, which had an enormous amount of bug fixes and addressed regression issues introduced by the security fixes for CVE-2017-2619. gPhoto had lots of improvements thanks to the update to libgphoto2 2.5.13. The snapshot also updated ethtool to version 4.10, which synchronized the utility used for displaying and modifying some parameters of network interface controllers with the upstream release, and yast2-fonts’ 3.2.0 version fixed regression introduced in version 3.1.17 and added UTF-8 encoding to Ruby strings.

Snapshot 20170414  provided the 3.5.25 version of squid in the repositories, which fixed aspects involved with data connections and FTP traffic intercepts, and yast2-dhcp-server’s 3.2.2 version fixed a crash happens with the latest yast2-core and yast2-ruby-bindings packages. The premier library for Internationalization Components for Unicode (ICU), which provides globalized support for software applications, was updated to version  58.2 and fixed some issues for Cantonese, Greek and Arabic users as well as updated Emoji characters and 19 new symbols for the new 4K TV standard.

Mozilla Firefox fixed a startup crash on Linux with it’s 52.0.2 release in Tumbleweed’s 20170413 snapshot and the Linux Kernel was updated to version 4.10.9. Linux Kernel initiator open-iscsi had a large amount of patch removals and additions. The btrfs file system matured even more with the release of version 4.10.2. The suite and art application Calligra received a fix for crash when using arrow keys in version 3.0.1 and it’s Flow chart added undo commands. The snapshot also merged upstream Ceph fixes for the codestream. WindowMaker 0.95.8 added some patches and new features for veteran users. (more…)

Bird Watching: An openSUSE Maker Project

April 18th, 2017 by

Creating cool projects is what makes openSUSE so much fun and a recent project by an openSUSE member highlights just how creative and fun one can be using openSUSE.

Adrian Schröter took a Raspberry Pi 3 using openSUSE to create a 3D-printed foldable tripod and took the idea even further by using the Raspberry Pi 3 used to build the tripod to take interval photographs of a Storch and it’s nest with a Sony A5100 camera.

The nest appeared in 2016 and Schröter has been taking pictures of the Storch and it’s nest for a few months.

To print the foldable tripod, Schröter made the design using FreeCAD, which is a general purpose 3D Computer-Aided Design program that he packages for openSUSE’s distributions. Sony A5100 support for Gphoto from another community member, Marcus Meissner, helped to get the camera functioning to take photos roughly every 30 seconds.

Schröter has a blog about that updates pictures about the Storch and it’s nest at http://www.storch-bleckmar.de. The blog is in German, so brush up on your Deutsch or just enjoy the photos.

Newest GNOME, KDE, Kernel Arrive in Tumbleweed

April 6th, 2017 by

Eighteen openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots brought several new packages to users last month, which included both  GNOME 3.24 and KDE Plasma 5.9.4.

GNOME 3.24 received most of the hype in snapshot 20170322, but that release also included Mozilla Firefox’s newest 52.0.1 version, which added support for WebAssembly, an emerging standard that brings near-native performance to Web-based games, apps, and software libraries without the use of plugins.

Closing out the month, snapshot 20170331 brought git 2.12.2 that provided a Command Line Interface output fix and python 3.6.1, which provided some bug fixes and updates to documentation. Ruby 2.2 switched to git-branch based patching and patched an exploitable heap overflow vulnerability for CVE-2016-2339. (more…)

Conference to have Daily Keynote Speakers

April 5th, 2017 by

The openSUSE Conference is about seven weeks away and this year will again have high-quality keynote speakers.

Keynote speakers for this year’s conference at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 26 – 28 will be from SaltStack, KDE and Free Software Foundation Europe.

Matthias Kirschner, President of FSFE, will take the stage on May 26 at 10 a.m. and provide attendees an exorbitant amount of information about governance and open source.

Later that evening, there will be entertainment and a Brazilian style barbecue, so stick around for the Friday night fun.

The following day (May 27) at 10 a.m., we welcome back the Chief Technology Officer and co-founder of SaltStack, Thomas Hatch. Hatch will be discussing how to control modern data center complexity, and turn it to a competitive advantage, using SaltStack and SUSE technologies.

This year vice-president of the KDE e.V., Aleix Pol, will discuss the development process, and then will go over what the KDE community has been up to in terms of Quality Assurance. Pol’s keynote, which is at 10 a.m. on May 28, will present ideas to collaborate and create better solutions together across the open-source ecosystem.

If you have not registered for the openSUSE Conference, now would be a good time. Look for the schedule to be released in the coming weeks.