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Archive for September, 2017

New Repository Caters to Tumbleweed’s Nvidia Users

September 20th, 2017 by

Using Nvidia drivers on openSUSE Tumbleweed in the past was cumbersome and fragile when it came to regular snapshot updates.

Often users needed to uninstall the NVIDIA’s userspace driver (like libGL, Xserver glx library, etc.) before updating to the latest Tumbleweed snapshot and reinstall the NVIDIA’s userspace driver afterward. Otherwise users may have ended up in a mess with Mesa overwriting NVIDIA’s userspace drivers.

In addition with every kernel update, users needed to recompile the kernel module due to possible Kernel Application Binary Interface (kABI) changes in a new Linux kernel. The easiest way to achieve this was to completely uninstall NVIDIA’s driver (“nvidia-installer –uninstall”) and reinstall it after the Tumbleweed update.

Now, openSUSE Tumbleweed users have a better solution.

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New KDE Applications, PulseAudio Arrive in Tumbleweed

September 14th, 2017 by

The last openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot has arrived and brought the newest version of KDE Applications as well as a new PulseAudio version.

KDE Applications 17.08.1 was released in the 20170911 snapshot along with an updated version of GNU Compiler Collection 6. The newest 17.08.1 version included 20 recorded bugfixes with improvements to Gwenview, Kdenlive, Konsole, Okular, KDE games and more. The newer GCC6 version renamed the tarball and source to make factory-auto happy, according to the change log.

Four other snapshots were released since the beginning of last week.

In snapshot 20170909, Mesa 17.2.0 implemented the OpenGL 4.5 Application Programming Interface; the announcement from Mesa suggest that people should stick with the previous version or wait for the 17.2.1 release because of driver support. Users who are blind or visually impaired will be pleased to know that BRLTTY, which drives the braille display and provides complete screen review functionality was updated to version 5.5. Also in the snapshot, the release of iproute2 4.13 brought improvements to the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF), which provides a raw interface to data link layers and permits raw link-layer packets to be sent and received. (more…)

Are Governments Held Hostage? Why openSUSE Supports Public Money Public Code

September 13th, 2017 by

Public Money? Public Code! from Free Software Foundation Europe on Vimeo.

Europeans can disagree on political issues, but there is one issue the open-source community is bringing to the political spectrum that many citizens can find agreement about; publicly funded software has to be Free and Open Source Software.

“Public institutions spend millions of euros each year on the development of new software tailored to their needs,” according to a release from the non-profit advocacy group Free Software Foundation Europe. “The procurement choices of the public sector play a significant role in determining which companies are allowed to compete and what software is supported with tax payers’ money.

To bring awareness to this issue, FSFE started the “Public Money Public Code” campaign at https://publiccode.eu, which was originally revealed by Matthias Kirschner during the keynote at the openSUSE Conference, and the openSUSE Project encourages all its members and open source enthusiasts to sign the open letter addressed to European politicians about this important public issue. This can also be achieved with the sharing of videos on the topic.

There are many reasons for why code of publicly-funded software projects should be freely available for people to study, develop, enhance and use.

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