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Archive for January, 2018

openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week

January 22nd, 2018 by

The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26.

The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3.

“We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”

Leap 42.3 was released on July 26, 2017 and users were expected to upgrade from Leap 42.2 within 6 months of 42.3’s release.

Leap 42.2 was released in November of 2016. Its support life cycle of 42.2 has given users several months of maintenance.

The major release of the Leap 42 series has so far provided a support life cycle of 27 months and is expected to last until early 2019; when openSUSE Leap 42.3 will reach its EOL. That gives the major version of Leap 42 more than 36 months of life-cycle support. However, the EOL for the Leap 42 series is dependent on the release of the next major version, which will be openSUSE Leap 15 and it’s expected to be released later this Spring.

cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards

January 18th, 2018 by

The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs.

The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

“On behalf of the openSUSE Project and the many developers and packagers who use OBS to develop open-source software, we thank cPanel for their generosity,” said Richard Brown, openSUSE Chairman. “This contribution not only helps the openSUSE project but will help other open-source projects as well.”

OBS is a generic system to build and distribute binary packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way. It can release packages as well as updates, add-ons, appliances and entire distributions for a wide range of operating systems and hardware architectures.

“We use an internal installation of the Open Build Service, and also help customers and third parties use the public OBS at build.opensuse.org,” said Ken Power, Vice President of Product Development at cPanel. “Supporting the open source projects that we use is incredibly important to us, and we’re glad to be able to help here.”

The network cards will be used to improve the backend of OBS.

“The cards will be used to connect the OBS backend storage and network; bringing it from a 1GB to 10BG and improving the backend performance,” said Thorsent Bro, a member of the openSUSE Heroes team. “We want to thank cPanel for its generous support and giving back to the projects that help with Linux/GNU development.”

Become a Google Summer of Code Mentor for openSUSE

January 15th, 2018 by

The  application period for organizations wanting to participate in the Google Summer of Code is now and the openSUSE project is once again looking for mentors who are willing to put forth projects to mentor GSoC students.

People interested in submitting a project for GSoC as part of an openSUSE mentors team can submit it to https://github.com/openSUSE/mentoring/issues. The submissions will be reflected on openSUSE 101 and submitted as part of a mentorship package to the official GSoC website.

“If you have a new project for this year, please open a new issue for each project immediately and label it accordingly,” said Christian Bruckmayer, an openSUSE mentor. “If you have a potential project, please email us ASAP.”

The deadline is Jan. 23 to submit the full package for GSoC, Bruckmayer said.

The full timeline of GSoC can found here at https://developers.google.com/open-source/gsoc/timeline.

GSoC is an international program that matches mentors and students and funded 1,315 student projects last year for 201 open source organizations. Last year, five students participated in GSoC under the openSUSE organizing team.

GSoC students, mentors and projects benefit from the active involvement of new mentors.  Many previous GSoC students later become mentors in the GSoC.

Email the mentors team at gsoc-mentors@opensuse.org.

New Python3, LibreOffice, Google RE2 Packages Released in Tumbleweed

January 11th, 2018 by

Several openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots arrive before and after the new year and this post will focus on the most recent snapshots released this week.

Much of the efforts of developers this week have focused on patching the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. openSUSE’s rolling distribution produced four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots so far this week.

While the Long-Term Support 4.4 Linux Kernel has patched many of the vulnerabilities associated with Meltdown and Spectre, the 4.14.12 Linux Kernel released in snapshot 20180107  hasn’t, but Tumbleweed users will likely see the vulnerabilities patched soon.

The most recent snapshot 20180109, which was released within the past hour, brought KDE Frameworks 5.41.0, which brought 70 addon libraries to Qt. A major version was released for LibreOffice as the libreoffice 6.0.0.1 package had many fixes in gpg4libre and new features for Writer, Calc and Draw. Poppler 0.62.0 was also included in the snapshot and removed Qt4 poppler package following upstream change

Newer packages that arrived in the 20180107 snapshot were Chat Client irssi 1.0.6, which fixed some random memory bugs, and the llvm 5.0.1, which delete intermediate files during build to reduce total disk usage. And kcm_sddm 5.11.5 was a bug fix release.

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openSUSE Conference Registration, Call For Papers Opens Today

January 11th, 2018 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2018 (oSC18), which takes place in Prague, Czech Republic, are open.

The dates for this year’s conference will be May 25 through May 27 at Faculty of Information Technologies of Czech Technical University in Prague. Submission for the call for papers will be open until April 20. There are 99 day from today to submit a proposal, but don’t wait until the late minute. Registration will be open from today until the day oSC18 begins; make sure to answer the survey question regarding the T-Shirt size.

Presentations can be submitted in one of the following formats:

  • Lightning Talks (15 mins)
  • Short Talks (30 mins)
  • Normal Talks (45 mins)
  • Long Workshop (3 hours)
  • Short Workshop (90 mins)

The tracks listed for the conference are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

While these tracks might be refined to better categorize or consolidate topics, people should submit proposals even if they don’t think it fits into one of the tracks.

A Program Committee will evaluate the proposals based on the submitted abstracts and the accepted proposals will be announced no later than April 21.

Volunteers who would like to participate on the Program Committee or the Organizing Team for the conference should email ddemaio (@) suse.de and phodac (@) suse.cz.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC18.

Future Tumbleweed Snapshot to Bring YaST Changes

January 9th, 2018 by

What you need to know about the new storage stack (storage-ng)

Changes to YaST are coming and people using openSUSE Tumbleweed will be the first to experience these planned changes in a snapshot that is expected to be released soon.

Those following the YaST Team blog may have been read about the implementation changes expected for libstorage-ng, which have been discussed for nearly two years. Libstorage is the component used by YaST; specially used in the installer, the partitioner and AutoYaST to access disks, partitions, LVM volumes and more.

This relatively low-level component has been a constant source of headaches for YaST developers for years, but all that effort is about to bear fruit. The original design has fundamental flaws that limited YaST in many ways and the YaST Team have been working to write a replacement for it: the libstorage-ng era has begun.

This document offers an incomplete but very illustrative view of the new things that libstorage-ng will allow in the future and the libstorage limitations it will allow to leave behind. For example, it already makes possible to install a fully encrypted system with no LVM using the automatic proposal and to handle much better filesystems placed directly on a disk without any partitioning. In the short future, it will allow to fully manage Btrfs multi-device filesystems, bcache and many other technologies that were impossible to accommodate into the old system.

What’s new, right here right now

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Current Status: openSUSE and “Spectre” & “Meltdown” vulnerabilities

January 4th, 2018 by

Hi folks,

By now you probably heard about the new “Spectre” and “Meltdown” side channel
attacks against current processors.

openSUSE, same as almost all other current operating systems, is affected by
these problems.

For SUSE Linux Enterprise we posted these blog and technical information
pages that in their descriptions also match openSUSE, so I would not duplicate
all of this information:

https://www.suse.com/c/suse-addresses-meltdown-spectre-vulnerabilities/

https://www.suse.com/support/kb/doc/?id=7022512

SUSE engineers have been working with other hardware and operating systems
vendors to prepare patches to mitigate these flaws over the last weeks
and have been preparing updates.

As the embargo was lifted last night, we could now also start openSUSE
updates.

For openSUSE Leap 42.2 and 42.3, we have the advantage that the
kernel codebase is shared between SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 SP2 and SP3
respectively, so the work mostly consisted of simply merging git branches.

The openSUSE Leap 42.2 and 42.3 kernel updates are currently building
and once they have passed a quick openQA check they will be released.

For openSUSE Tumbleweed we have ported patches on top of Linux Kernel 4.14
and a submission against the Factory projects has been done.

Here also a quick openQA check will be run and then it will be released
for our Tumbleweed users in the next days.

Additionally, these updates are accompanied also by ucode-intel,
kernel-firmware and qemu updates needed for one variant of the Spectre
Attack.

Regards,

Marcus Meissner & the openSUSE Security Team