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Archive for January, 2018

openSUSE Leap 15 Reaches Beta Phase Snapshots

January 31st, 2018 by

The development version of openSUSE Leap 15 has reached its beta phase builds and snapshots are available for testers via http://download.opensuse.org/distribution/leap/15.0/iso/.

Exactly like the rolling development model used to make openSUSE Leap 42.3, Leap 15.0 will use the same model until its final build. No concrete milestones will be used building up to the final release, which is expected in late Spring. As bugs are fixed and new packages introduced or excluded, snapshots of the latest beta phase builds will be released once they pass openQA testing; the first beta version build (Build 109.3) of openSUSE Leap 15 was recently released and there are currently two follow-on beta builds that would feature minor improvements if the beta builds pass openQA .

Announcements of new builds will be made on the opensuse-factory mailing list.

The beta Leap builds feature an all new fresh look, the Linux Long-Term-Support Kernel (LTS)  4.12* Kernel and users can test out KDE’s next LTS release of Plasma 5.12.

One bigger update remains to be integrated, wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel; that being rpm 4.14 that was released in openSUSE Tumbleweed just two weeks ago.

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Find Out the Visa Requirements to Attend oSC18

January 29th, 2018 by

For people planning on attending the openSUSE Conference 2018 in Prague, Czech Republic, from May 25 – 27, there are certain requirements necessary to receive a visa for those who are not a citizen of a Schengen country.

It’s a good idea to start thinking about getting your visa and this post summarizes the requirements.

Please note: the Travel Support Program has no provisions to cover the cost of a visa, so it’s the travelers responsibility for covering the additional cost.

Alphabet Nation

You must apply for a Schengen visa through the Czech embassy or consulate in your country if you are from one of the following countries:

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The future of openSUSE-Education

January 27th, 2018 by

Logo of the openSUSE-EducationThe openSUSE-Education project tries to support schools using openSUSE. We create and describe additional software-repositories for educational projects and we created Add-on medias and finally a live DVD from the regular openSUSE distribution.

As you can see in our timeline, we achieved quite a lot in the past years, had fun and meet a couple of very nice people out there in our spare time. But the main team members moved on to new projects, with the hope that we would one day find some time to work more on openSUSE-Education again. This does not seem to happen – at least not for the foreseeable future.

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openSUSE – Meltdown & Spectre Update – 26 Jan 2018

January 26th, 2018 by

Hi folks,

This is an update to our current Meltdown and Spectre situation on openSUSE Leap and Tumbleweed.

We have released kernels with initial Meltdown and Spectre mitigations begin of January.

For openSUSE Leap 42.2 and 42.3 we released updates on January 5th.

For openSUSE Tumbleweed we released 4.14.11, 4.14.12 and 4.14.13 kernels in the first weeks of January.
Initially there were some bugs with those kernels and 32bit binaries, which were finally fixed with 4.14.13.

What is currently released:

– The Meltdown attack is fully mitigated by the Kernel Page Table Isolation feature (KPTI) with those Linux Kernel updates.

– The Spectre Variant 1 attack for the Linux kernel is mitigated with various speculative fences added throughout the kernel code. We might add more in case some places have been missed.

– We released Qemu updates for passing through CPU flags for Variant 2 mitigations

– We released Firefox, Chromium, and Webkit2Gtk3 updates that remove the Javascript exploitation vector for Meltdown and Spectre.

What is partially mitigated:

– The Spectre Variant 2 … The initial kernel updates we have released require CPU Microcode updates.

While we have released updates for some Intel chipsets and also AMD Ryzen, the Intel CPU Microcode updates were later found to be unstable and have now been retracted.

Intel is currently working on better versions of the CPU Microcode, which we will ship once they become available.

For openSUSE Tumbleweed we have reverted the “ucode-intel” package to the pre-Spectre state.

For openSUSE Leap 42.2 and 42.3 we have retracted the updated “ucode-intel” packages, so it is necessary to downgrade them manually if you are encountering problems like MCE errors.

This can be done by:

– openSUSE Leap 42.2: zypper in -f ucode-intel-20170707-7.6.1
– openSUSE Leap 42.3: zypper in -f ucode-intel-20170707-10.1

What will come soon:

– We are working on Spectre Variant 2 mitigations using so called “retpolines” (“return trampolines”), that largely remove the need for firmware mitigations.

We already released gcc48 system compilers for Leap and gcc7 for Tumbleweed with support for this code

We are working on Linux Kernel updates that will enable retpoline support and so mitigate Variant 2.

– XEN updates

The XEN team is developing methods to mitigate Meltdown and Spectre and once they become available we will be also releasing XEN updates for them.

 

Ruby, YaST, Plasma 5.12 Beta Get Updates in Tumbleweed

January 26th, 2018 by

openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed received several snapshot of new software packages this past week.

A total of six snapshots arrived and brought new versions of Ruby, YaST, KDE’s Plasma 5.12 Beta and many others.

The latest snapshot, 20180124, switched the default for Ruby to version 2.5. Package improvements were made to the command line tool SUSEConnect 0.3.7. A change to cups-filters 1.19.0 in order to allow builds on systems without python2 was made with python3-cups rather than using python-cups. Enscript 1.6.6 fixed a handful of bugs and spec-cleaner 1.0.2 added groups for Rust and made the switch to pytest. Git, squid and perl-Encode also received minor updates in the snapshot.

The largest snapshot of the week was no doubt snapshot 20180122. The snapshot provided KDE Applications 17.12.1, Frameworks 5.42.0 and the beta version for KDE’s next  Long-Term-Support (LTS) release of Plasma 5.12. Tumbleweed users can tryout the new items in the 5.12 LTS like the new KDE Store, which brings a wide selection of addons. With the exception of updates to libgme, download manager uget and Oracle’s virtualbox, the release was primarily focused on the new versions from the KDE community. It is worth noting that virtualbox 5.2.6 fixed quite a few Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) and libgme 0.6.2 fixed crashes in nsfe emulator. Gamers should be happy.

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openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week

January 22nd, 2018 by

The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26.

The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3.

“We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”

Leap 42.3 was released on July 26, 2017 and users were expected to upgrade from Leap 42.2 within 6 months of 42.3’s release.

Leap 42.2 was released in November of 2016. Its support life cycle of 42.2 has given users several months of maintenance.

The major release of the Leap 42 series has so far provided a support life cycle of 27 months and is expected to last until early 2019; when openSUSE Leap 42.3 will reach its EOL. That gives the major version of Leap 42 more than 36 months of life-cycle support. However, the EOL for the Leap 42 series is dependent on the release of the next major version, which will be openSUSE Leap 15 and it’s expected to be released later this Spring.

cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards

January 18th, 2018 by

The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs.

The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

“On behalf of the openSUSE Project and the many developers and packagers who use OBS to develop open-source software, we thank cPanel for their generosity,” said Richard Brown, openSUSE Chairman. “This contribution not only helps the openSUSE project but will help other open-source projects as well.”

OBS is a generic system to build and distribute binary packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way. It can release packages as well as updates, add-ons, appliances and entire distributions for a wide range of operating systems and hardware architectures.

“We use an internal installation of the Open Build Service, and also help customers and third parties use the public OBS at build.opensuse.org,” said Ken Power, Vice President of Product Development at cPanel. “Supporting the open source projects that we use is incredibly important to us, and we’re glad to be able to help here.”

The network cards will be used to improve the backend of OBS.

“The cards will be used to connect the OBS backend storage and network; bringing it from a 1GB to 10BG and improving the backend performance,” said Thorsent Bro, a member of the openSUSE Heroes team. “We want to thank cPanel for its generous support and giving back to the projects that help with Linux/GNU development.”

Become a Google Summer of Code Mentor for openSUSE

January 15th, 2018 by

The  application period for organizations wanting to participate in the Google Summer of Code is now and the openSUSE project is once again looking for mentors who are willing to put forth projects to mentor GSoC students.

People interested in submitting a project for GSoC as part of an openSUSE mentors team can submit it to https://github.com/openSUSE/mentoring/issues. The submissions will be reflected on openSUSE 101 and submitted as part of a mentorship package to the official GSoC website.

“If you have a new project for this year, please open a new issue for each project immediately and label it accordingly,” said Christian Bruckmayer, an openSUSE mentor. “If you have a potential project, please email us ASAP.”

The deadline is Jan. 23 to submit the full package for GSoC, Bruckmayer said.

The full timeline of GSoC can found here at https://developers.google.com/open-source/gsoc/timeline.

GSoC is an international program that matches mentors and students and funded 1,315 student projects last year for 201 open source organizations. Last year, five students participated in GSoC under the openSUSE organizing team.

GSoC students, mentors and projects benefit from the active involvement of new mentors.  Many previous GSoC students later become mentors in the GSoC.

Email the mentors team at gsoc-mentors@opensuse.org.

New Python3, LibreOffice, Google RE2 Packages Released in Tumbleweed

January 11th, 2018 by

Several openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots arrive before and after the new year and this post will focus on the most recent snapshots released this week.

Much of the efforts of developers this week have focused on patching the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. openSUSE’s rolling distribution produced four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots so far this week.

While the Long-Term Support 4.4 Linux Kernel has patched many of the vulnerabilities associated with Meltdown and Spectre, the 4.14.12 Linux Kernel released in snapshot 20180107  hasn’t, but Tumbleweed users will likely see the vulnerabilities patched soon.

The most recent snapshot 20180109, which was released within the past hour, brought KDE Frameworks 5.41.0, which brought 70 addon libraries to Qt. A major version was released for LibreOffice as the libreoffice 6.0.0.1 package had many fixes in gpg4libre and new features for Writer, Calc and Draw. Poppler 0.62.0 was also included in the snapshot and removed Qt4 poppler package following upstream change

Newer packages that arrived in the 20180107 snapshot were Chat Client irssi 1.0.6, which fixed some random memory bugs, and the llvm 5.0.1, which delete intermediate files during build to reduce total disk usage. And kcm_sddm 5.11.5 was a bug fix release.

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