Home Home > 2018 > 02
Sign up | Login

Archive for February, 2018

2018 openSUSE board elections

February 26th, 2018 by

Elections to fill three seats on the openSUSE Board are set to begin in the coming weeks and candidates are needed to fill these three positions.

Individuals who apply for an openSUSE Membership will be able to vote during elections and run for candidacy

Candidates elected to the position will serve a 24-month term. The terms of Gertjan Lettink, Bryan Lunduke and Tomas Chvatal will expire and this is a great opportunity for any member who is interested in helping the project from a seat like this to run and be elected

Members of the openSUSE board help to influence the future direction of the project. Members are encouraged to learn the election process, run for the board or propose a candidate.

Election Committee

(more…)

What Is New With KDE’s Plasma 5.12 in openSUSE Leap

February 23rd, 2018 by


KDE Plasma 5.8 users coming from openSUSE Leap 42.3 to Plasma 5.12 on Leap 15 will notice significant changes when upgrading to the new versions.

The boot up time for KDE’s new Long Term Support release is faster and there is more optimization.

There have been performance optimizations all over the KDE desktop. The file operations in Dolphin are much faster now than with older KDE Frameworks releases. Plasma 5.12 has lower memory requirements and there are several new features users will notice from Leap 42.3 and Plasma 5.8.

The notification system gained support for interactive previews, which allows users to quickly take screenshots and drag them into a chat window, an email composer or a web browser; that makes it convenient for the user to not have to leave an application that is being used.

Music lovers will enjoy the new Music Controls in the Lock Screen. The new Media Controls include Previous and Next track. Play and pause are also included and it shows the song title that is playing. The lock screen controls can be disabled for added privacy.

(more…)

Tumbleweed Has Updates for Frameworks, Applications, Plasma

February 22nd, 2018 by

The were plenty of updated packages in openSUSE Tumbleweed this week and KDE updates were made available for Frameworks, Applications and Plasma.

While the most recent snapshot didn’t include an update of a KDE package, four out of the six snapshots this week did.

Snapshot 20180220 brought a few lesser known packages. The C library for asynchronous DNS requests known as c-ares updated to version 1.14.0. The c-ares update provided a patch for Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)-2017-1000381 to protect against a network attack. The image view Eye of GNOME updated translations with the eog-plugins 3.26.2. The Xfce library targeted at application development known as Exo now has version 0.12.0, which was released from upstream six day before being released in this 20180220 snapshot. The requirements were updated for exo 0.12.0 and they include GTK 2.24, GTK 3.22, GLib 2.42, libxfce4ui 4.12 and libxfce4util 4.12. Developers looking to generate random numbers will find the update of the haveged 1.9.2 package. The Haveged package contains a daemon that generates an unpredictable stream of random numbers and feeds the /dev/random device.

Linux Kernel 4.15.4 provided a fix to auto-negotiate security settings mismatches the 20180219 snapshot. Issues with AppStream required appstream-glib to revert from version 0.7.5 back to 0.7.4. The snapshot brought the first point release for KDE’s Long Term Support release of Plasma 5.12. The Plasma 5.12.1 version fixed several bugs including a fix for the mouse settings module that was crashing on Wayland.

(more…)

University students, openSUSE participates in GSoC!

February 19th, 2018 by

openSUSE participates again in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. :sunny: With this article, I will provide my experience as a former GSoC student and mentor, give you more details about the program and try to encourage students to get involved in openSUSE development through GSoC.

Why open source and openSUSE?

First of all, you may wonder why you should want to get involved in open source development. Everybody has their own reasons, but for me there are three main ones:

  • I have fun: The most important reason is that it is fun. At openSUSE, we have great conferences, geekos everywhere, geeko cookies, openSUSE beer, fun stickers,… and the most important part: we have fun when working!
  • I learn a lot: In most of the projects, every single line of code is reviewed. That means not only that the code quality is better, but also that every time you write something wrong or that can be improved, someone will tell you. In open source, we think that making mistakes is perfectly fine. That people correct you is the best way to learn.
  • People: I have the chance to work with really skilled people all around the world, who are interested in the same things as me.

Why GSoC?

Starting is always difficult, but you don’t have to do it alone! In openSUSE, you will always find people to help you, and with GSoC this is even easier. The best feature of the program is that you will always have at least one mentor (most likely two) who will lead you through it. In addition, you will work in a project used in the real world by many users and all your code will be released under an open source license, so everybody can access, use, study, change and share it. Last, you will receive a stipend between 2,400 and 6,600 dollars depending on the country.

Projects

At openSUSE, you can find projects written in Ruby on RailsPerlRubyHTML/JavaScriptC/C++ and much more. This year you can work during GSoC in some of the most central and biggest projects in openSUSE: Open Build ServiceopenQA and YaST. They will for sure be challenging projects to work in, but don’t get scared, as that means that you will learn a lot from it too. And remember that your mentors and other openSUSE contributors will be there to help you!

But we also have simpler projects such as Trollolo, where any computer science university student could get started with Ruby. The desire to learn is much more important than the previous experience and knowledge.

(more…)

Freetype, Flatpak, Sysdig Receive Updates in Tumbleweed

February 15th, 2018 by

The streak of six Tumbleweed snapshots continued this a week as openSUSE’s rolling release has provided a consistent release of six snapshots per week this year.

There were hundreds of packages updated this week and sysdig, Freetype and Flatpak were just a few of the many packages to receive an updated version.

At the time of publishing this article, snapshot 20180213 was the most recent snapshot released. Mozilla Firefox 58.0.2 fixed a tab crash during printing. The package yast2-ca-management was dropped with the autoyast2 4.0.31 update. A new set of functions that allows 64-bit offsets even on 32-bit systems are now available with cryptsetup 2.0.1, which is a user-space utility for dealing with the DMCrypt kernel module for setting up encrypted disk volumes. Cryptsetup also increased maximum allowed Password-Based Key Derivation Function 2 (PBKDF) memory-cost limit to 4 GiB. Another notable package in the snapshot was the update of the Ruby debugger package rubygem-byebug  10.0.0, which added Ruby 2.5.0 support and fixed a remote server crash when interrupting a client.

KDE Applications 17.12.2 was made available in the 20180212 snapshot; about 20 recorded bugfixes include improvements to Kontact, Dolphin, Gwenview, KGet and Okular. View the changelog for a full list of changes and fixes for Applications 17.12.2. Flatpak 0.10.3 fixed vulnerability in dbus proxy and updated a Polish translation. Position Independent Executables improvements were made with Snappy 1.1.7 as well as improvements to CMake build support for 64-bit Linux distributions. Added support for the USB 3.1 SuperSpeedPlus device capability was also made available in the snapshot with the usbutils 009 package. There were also several YaST package updates.

(more…)

Project Selected as Mentoring Organization for Google Summer of Code

February 14th, 2018 by


Let the fun begin! This week it was announced that the
openSUSE Project is one of the 212 mentoring organization for this year’s Google Summer of Code, which is an annual international program that awards stipends to university students to write code and learn about open source development during their summer break.

The openSUSE Project has participated in GSoC since 2006 and has helped more than 50 students get started with free software development.

As a mentoring organization, eligible students will have an opportunity between March 12 – 27 to submit a project proposal to the GSoC program site. The program is open to university students aged 18 or over.

The openSUSE website dedicated to GSoC offers nine projects that GSoC students can select from to use for their proposals. The topics focus on web development, quality assurance, packaging and user experience design. The technologies used in the project are Ruby on Rails, Perl, Ruby, Html/JavaScript and C/C++. (more…)

Visit Combined Booths at SCaLE 16X, Save $ With Promo Code

February 12th, 2018 by

The 16th Southern California Linux Expo is about a month away, and openSUSE will once again have a booth with the KDE and GNOME booths.

The event takes place at the Pasadena Convention Center March 8 – 11.

Community members have been running the combined booths for several years and each year more people join the booth to pass along their knowledge and experience with each of the projects.

People who register between now and the event can get a 50 percent discount on their standard registration price using the promo codes SUSE, GNOME or KDE50.

We look forward to seeing you at SCaLE.

Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

February 8th, 2018 by

This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

The Wayland session has already been tested by openQA as part of the Tumbleweed release process as was mentioned in a previous news post, but now this is also done for live media. So, if you want to test Wayland without touching your existing installation, why not give the live media a try?

As always, have a lot of fun!

Official KDE Plasma 5.12 Release Now in Tumbleweed

February 8th, 2018 by

Mesa 18, cryptsetup 2 Also Arrive in Snapshots

KDE Plasma 5.12 transitioned from it beta version of 5.11.95 to the official release in an openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot earlier this week.

On the same day of the upstream release, Tumbleweed snapshot 20180206 brought the new desktop software to its thousands of rolling release users. Improved performance and several new features are available in Plasma 5.12 like Wayland-only Night Color feature that allows adjustments to the screen color temperature to reduce eye strain and the System Activity and System Monitor display per-process graphs for the CPU usage. The new KDE Store offers a wide selection of addons that are ready to be installed. Plasma 5.12 is the second long-term support (LTS) release from the Plasma 5 team and will be the version used in openSUSE’s traditional distribution openSUSE Leap 15, which is expected to be released this spring.

Other notable packages updated in the 20180206 snapshot were compiler cache (ccache) 3.3.6, which improved instructions on how to get cache hits between different working directories. Translations were made for Indonesian, Danish and Catalan in updates of gfxboot from 4.5.26 to 4.5.29. Kernel module handling kmod 25 improved testsuite and allows mkosi to run testsuite in different Linux distributions. The Linux Kernel was updated to 4.15.1.

(more…)

Where to Stay, Getting Around Prague for oSC18

February 7th, 2018 by

Prague is a beautiful city and you can bet that the city will be crowded during the openSUSE Conference. Hotels are already starting to fill up, so it’s best to take a look at the hotels we recommend now before all the hotels are booked out.

There are six hotels that are recommended, but feel free to book at other hotels in the city. The section for recommended lodging on the openSUSE Conference 2018 webpage gives options for hotels as low as 40 EUR a night to above 120 EUR. Each listing on the section gives a little info about the hotel.

Prague is a big city with excellent public transportation. With the exception of one hotel listed on the web page, which is the Vienna House Diplomat Prague, all other hotels are a few kilometers from the event location at the Faculty of Information Technologies of Czech Technical University in Prague.

Getting to the event with public transportation is inexpensive. A one-way ticket, which is good for 30 minutes, costs about 1 EUR. People can use the transportation map to figure out how to take public transportation from the hotel to the event. The transportation map offers an interactive map to help with planning.

(more…)