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Archive for August, 2018

Registration, CfP for openSUSE Conference 2019 Open

August 31st, 2018 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19), which takes place in Nuremberg, Germany, are open.

The dates for this year’s conference will be May 24 through May 26 once again at the Z-Bau. Submission for the call for papers will be open until Feb 3. Registration for the conference is open until the day oSC19 begins.

Presentations can be submitted in one of the following formats:

  • Lightning Talks (15 mins)
  • Short Talks (30 mins)
  • Normal Talks (45 mins)
  • Long Workshop (3 hours)
  • Short Workshop (90 mins)

The tracks listed for the conference are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

While these tracks might be refined to better categorize or consolidate topics, people should submit proposals even if they don’t think it fits into one of the tracks.

A Program Committee will evaluate the proposals based on the submitted abstracts and the accepted proposals will be announced mid February.

Volunteers who would like to participate on the Program Committee or the Organizing Team for the conference should email ddemaio (@) suse.de.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19.

Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Changes for KVM, QEMU, Xen

August 23rd, 2018 by

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were once again released this past week, which included two Linux Kernel updates.

The most recent snapshot, 20180818, updated the kernel to version 4.18.0, which brought many changes for KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine). Mozilla Firefox 61.0.2 improved website rendering with the Retained Display List feature enabled and also fixed broken DevTools panels. The ffmpeg 4.0.2 package in the snapshot added conditional package configuration and AOMedia Video 1 (AV1) support. Netfilter project nftables was restored as the default backend with firewalld 0.6.1 and now nftables and iptables can co-exist after a bug fix with the ‘nat’ table form the 4.18 kernel. The Command Line Interface configuration utility for wireless devices known as iw added support in its 4.14 for all new kernel features of kernel 4.14. The HTTP client/server library for GNOME, libsoup 2.62.3, now uses an atomic-refcounting in classes that are not using GObject-refcounting. The Linux Kernel 4.16 or higher is needed for the strace 4.24 package, which implemented decoding of KVM vcpu (virtual central processing unit) exit reason as an option, and yast2-http-server 4.1.1 fixed PHP support by dropping php5 and using php7.

The 20180815 Tumbleweed snapshot had the last 4.17 kernel with an update from Kernel 4.17.3 to 4.17.4. The new 7.0.8.9 version of ImageMagick has the XBM coder leave the hex image data uninitialized if hex value of the pixel is negative. Several fixes were made with btrfsprogs 4.17.1 and an add ability to fix wrong ram_bytes for compressed inline files was also made with the package update in the snapshot. The advanced twin panel file manager for KDE Plasma, krusader 2.7.1, had a few fixes including a fix to the search bar in the application that showed results for a file that was deleted. The qemu 2.12.1 package dropped several patches and the updated gave new mitigation functionality for CVE-2018-3639. Caching proxy squid 4.2 provided fixes for GNU Compiler Collection 8 and a missing pointer. There were also several patches in the xen 4.11.0 update for GCC 8 and the yast2-storage-ng 4.1.4 update addressed the partitioner and now displays Xen virtual partitions and allows users to format and mount them.

Snapshot 20180815 recorded a stable rating of 93 on the snapshot reviewer and 20180818 is currently trending a moderate rating of 86.

Language, Networking Packages Get Updates in Tumbleweed

August 16th, 2018 by

There were two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this past week that mostly focused on language and network packages.

The Linux Kernel also received an update a couple days ago to version 4.17.13.

The packages in the 20180812 Tumbleweed snapshot brought fixes in NetworkManager-applet 1.8.16, which also modernized the package for GTK 3 use in preparations for GTK 4. The free remote desktop protocol client had its third release candidate for freerdp 2.0.0 where it improved automatic reconnects, added Wave2 support and fixed automount issues. More network device card IDs for the Intel 9000 series were added in kernel  4.17.13. A jump from libstorage-ng 4.1.0 to version 4.1.10 brought several translations and added unit test for probing xen xvd devices. Two Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures fixes were made with the update in postgresql 10.5. Several rubygem packages were updated to versions 5.2.1 including rubygem-rails 5.2.1, which makes the master.key file read-only for the owner upon generation on POSIX-compliant systems. Processing XML and HTML with python-lxml 4.2.4 should have fewer crashes thanks to a fix of sporadic crashes during garbage collection when parse-time schema validation is used and the parser participates in a reference cycle. Several YaST packages receive updates including a new ServiceWidget to manage the service status with yast2-ftp-server 4.1.3 as well with yast2-http-server, yast2-slp-server and yast2-squid 4.1.0 versions.

The snapshot from 20180808 brought the firewalld 0.6.0 version, which switched back to an ‘iptables’ backend as a default; “loads of new services” were added in the newer version including the addition of firewall-config adding a ipv6-icmp to the protocol dropdown box. The Linux Filesystem in Userspace interface, fuse 2.9.8, provided security update for systems where SELinux is active. The security update stops an unprivileged users to specify the allow_other option even when it was forbidden in the /etc/fuse.conf. The snapshot also updated yast2-network 4.1.5 that fixes the networking AutoYaST schema

Snapshot 20180808 recorded a stable rating of 95 on the snapshot reviewer and 20180812 is trending at a 96 rating.

openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

(more…)

openSUSE Leap 42.3 End of Life is Extended

August 8th, 2018 by

The usual lifetime of openSUSE Leap minor versions have traditionally received updates for about 18 months, but the minor version of Leap 42.3 is being extended.

The last minor version of the Leap 42 series was scheduled to be maintained until January 2019, but that has changed thanks to SUSE committing to additional months of maintenance and security updates. Leap 42.3 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack (SP) 3  and SUSE has agreed to keep publishing updates for Leap 42.3 until June 2019.

This means the extended End of Life for Leap 42.3 will increase the total lifetime of the Leap 42 series to 44 months.

Users of the openSUSE Leap 42 series are encouraged to use the additional months to prepare the upgrade to Leap 15, which was released in May.

Those who can’t migrate production servers to the new major version in time may want to take a (commercial) SLE subscription into consideration, which provides even a longer lifecycle. The proximity of Leap 42’s base system to SLE 12 keeps the technical effort to migrate workflows from Leap to SLE low.