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openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017: Call for Sponsorships

July 28th, 2017 by

The openSUSE.Asia Committee is seeking sponsors for the fourth edition of openSUSE.Asia Summit. The summit will take place in Tokyo, Japan, from Oct. 21– 22, 2017. With more than 100 attendees every year, we expect the trend to follow suit. Our attendees are home, power and business users. Sponsorship covers facility and travel costs.

We aim to provide a free platform for users, contributors, and developers. The summit fosters relationships across open source enthusiasts. Attendees take this opportunity to learn about different modern technologies and share their experiences. Sponsorships show your appreciation for our community. It is also a great way to

  • Promote your products in the community.
  • Business can promote their solutions / services to our community and stakeholders through business tracks.
  • Sponsors can promote their products / services through
    • openSUSE.Asia Summit website.
    • Printed materials advertising the event.
    • Summit welcome package.
    • Promotional advertising visible throughout the event location.
    • Other community events that we attend  to promote openSUSE.Asia summit.
    • Sponsors can also request a booth to highlight their products and businesses.

Contact opensuse-asia-17-contact@googlegroups.com no later than 15th of September, 2017. The sponsorship prospectus is available at:

English https://bitbucket.org/ftake/opensuse-asia-17-jp/raw/master/sponsor/call-for-sponsorship-en.pdf

Japanese

https://bitbucket.org/ftake/opensuse-asia-17-jp/raw/master/sponsor/call-for-sponsorship-ja.pdf

Refresh of Linux Distribution Continues Leveraging Community, Enterprise Benefits

July 26th, 2017 by

(Languages: DE, ES, FR, IT, ZH, zh_TW)

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Gives Smooth Desktop and Server UpgradeLeap-green.png

The openSUSE Project released openSUSE Leap 42.3 today bringing the community version more closely aligned with its shared core of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 3.

The mutual packages of both Leap and SLE distributions give seasoned Linux users, systems administrators, and developers even more reason to use the newest chameleon distribution.

Users are advised to take advantage of the seamless upgrade to Leap 42.3. Leap 42.2 reaches its end of maintenance in six months.

“By avoiding major version updates in the base system as well as the desktops, the upgrade to Leap 42.3 is a rather unadventurous matter,” said Ludwig Nussel, openSUSE Leap release manager.

The release of Leap 42.3 provides adopters a reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

Leap’s third edition of the 42 series has more than 10,000 packages and offers stability-minded users a refresh and hardware enablement release. The release is powered by the same Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel found in the previous Leap edition.

Leap 42.3 continues to use KDE’s Long-Term-Support release 5.8 as the default desktop selection while also offering GNOME 3.20, the same as used by SUSE Linux Enterprise. A variety of additional desktops is available in the installer through the newly designed desktop selection.

“Leap 42.3 is the culmination of several years of effort integrating SUSE’s Enterprise codebase with the exceptional high-quality work of the openSUSE community,” said Richard Brown, Chairman of the openSUSE Project. “I’m exceptionally proud of what the openSUSE Project has achieved with Leap 42.3 and hope our users appreciate this stable, yet innovative, approach to community Linux, which can really be relied upon to work.”

This release of openSUSE Leap is well suited for servers thanks to its server installation profile and its fully-featured text mode installer, including all the options of YaST without a graphical environment.

System administrators are going to love the backup solution Borg, which now can be used easier than ever thanks to Borgmatic’s wrapper to automatically backup your data daily with a systemd service. Sysadmins will also like Samba’s System Security Services Daemon integration with an Active Directory.

Leap, and the openSUSE project, provides the DevOps tool chain developers need to be successful. Microservices with Leap offer scalability and continuous delivery through the availability of Docker and Kubernetes as well as easy configuration with Salt, Ansible, and other openSUSE technologies. AutoYaST’s new integration with SaltStack and other configuration management systems can take care of the system installation (partitioning, network setup, etc.) and then delegate the system configuration to one of those widely used external tools.

Developers, and businesses can take advantage of extensive core libraries found in Leap 42.3 to build or enhance software for enterprise use. Since Leap and SLE share a common core, development with packages on Leap for use in production on SLE has never been easier. Furthermore, system integrators can develop on Leap with the possibility of getting their work into future SLE releases.

Leap provides the tools, languages and libraries for sustainable software development and engineering. Enterprise ready versions of Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, Rust, Haskell and PHP are all available in Leap.

Updates to the kernel and graphics stack enable more hardware and provide stability and performance improvements.
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Plan A Community Release Party for openSUSE Leap 42.3

July 17th, 2017 by

Many people are anxiously awaiting for the release of openSUSE Leap 42.3 next week, but before the release arrives, you can prepare for a Release Party to celebrate the upcoming achievement with members of the open-source and openSUSE community.

Host your own Release Party. If you don’t know how to do this, there is a list of five steps to have a successful release party. Plus more details are listed below on how to have a fantastic party.

Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires a bit of planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party. If you plan on having a party, email ddemaio (at) suse.de well before the party to get some goodies to hand out to the party people. Please include “Leap 42.3 Party” in the subject line and include a mailing address and phone number.

checklist:

Find a date

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Join the 3D Design and Printing Workshop

July 11th, 2017 by

Members of the openSUSE will host a 3D Design and Printing Workshop in Nuremberg on Sept. 10 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m at SUSE Headquarter.

The workshop, which as 60 spots available, will focus on teaching attendees on how to design and print 3D objects with open source tools like InkScape (easy enough for Kids) and FreeCAD.

“We will have a lot of fun at this workshop,” said Adrian Schroeter, an openSUSE member. “No matter the attendees experience of 3D design and printing, this workshop will give them the tools to make something and be creative. Plus, everybody gets the chance to take their own piece in printed form home.”

Those who are interested  are encouraged to attend the workshop that will teach both beginner and advanced level designing. Kids accompanied by an adult are welcomed to attend.

Attendees will learn about further tools needed for 3D printing and should come with a 3D model or STereoLithography file to modify. Attendees can find existing models at http://www.thingiverse.com.

There will be two LulzBot 3D Printers that were supplied by AlephObjects that people will be able to use for printing their projects.

Attendees should come with a laptop and have an openSUSE distribution installed or could also use openSUSE Leap from the Microsoft store . A list of tools for 3D design and printing can be found at https://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Science_Mechanical_engineering.

The workshop will try to support both German or English languages.

Please register at events.opensuse.org with your email address to receive more information before the workshop.

English openSUSE wiki updated and moved home

July 10th, 2017 by

The English openSUSE wiki has been moved and updated  successfully. If you encounter any issue, please let us know by mail to admin(@)opensuse.org.

On July 11, the MediaWiki instance hosted behind en.opensuse.org was set to read only, with some slight downtimes.

The reason for the downtime was the move of the wiki from the old Provo cluster to the new Nuremberg opensuse network.

Together with the move, the wiki was updated from MediaWiki 1.22 to 1.27, and the VM hosting it from an old SLE version to openSUSE Leap 42.3 (yes, we are eating our own dogfood!)

New features are:

–    including files directly from github -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:GitHub_inclusion

–    namespace-specific boilerplates (page templates) when creating new pages -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:MultiBoilerplate

–    better search (elasticsearch) – now searching all namespaces, but with different weight

–    login is now done using the Auth_remoteuser extension – but still with your openSUSE login

–    support for several map providers

–    switched extension for RSS feed integration (this needs adjustments on the pages that include RSS feeds) -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:RSS_feeds

–    watching a category (when pages get added to or removed from it) is now part of MediaWiki core

–    removal of Hermes notifications – MediaWiki’s own notifications work much better

Please be patient while we are doing the update. We’ll update this article and the status.opensuse.org webpage, plus we’ll send a followup mail to the opensuse-announce mailinglist when everything is done.

After updating the English wiki, we will let the dust settle for some days, and plan to update the localized wikis next week.

Tumbleweed Snapshots Pick Up Pace

June 8th, 2017 by

The care and thoroughness of making GNU Compiler Collection 7 the default compiler for openSUSE Tumbleweed produced a gradual decrease in snapshots over the past month, but it looks like snapshots of the rolling release are beginning to pick up the pace.

The four snapshots released this week aligns much to closer to upstream development and releases of GNOME, KDE, QEMU and Mesa top the list of this week’s new packages in Tumbleweed.

The newest snapshot, 20170605, saw a patch added for grub2 that fixed page fault exception when grub loads with NVIDIA cards and the libgcrypt 1.7.7 update made the noteworthy fix of a possible timing attack on EdDSA session key, which was previously patched. Nano 2.8.4 also improved PHP syntax highlighting in the snapshot.

Both Mozilla Thunderbird received changes to optimize and enhance compatibility with GCC 7 in the 20170604 snapshot with 64-bit. Expect 32-bit to come soon. QEMU 2.9.0 fixed several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) and improved support for several architectures and virtualization. Snapshot 20170604 also fixed some minor vulnerabilities like CVE-2017-9351 with Wireshark’s 2.2.7 version update and sudo 1.8.20 fixed CVE-2017-1000367.

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Next Leap 42.3 Snapshot Equates to Release Candidate

June 6th, 2017 by

Rolling Development Still needs Testing, Promoters

Since changing to a rolling development version model for the eventual release of openSUSE Leap 42.3, challenges have arisen to get more people testing it.

There is no milestone releases (Alpha or Beta) for openSUSE Leap 42.3, but snapshots of the development version are constantly being released.

“So far I have not seen too many 42.3 bugs,” said Leap Release Manager Luwdig Nussel in his talk at the openSUSE Conference. “I don’t think we are bug free, so I think it just is not tested enough.”

Some Linux users might find a rolling development process for a Linux release to be less appealing for testing, but testing is certainly necessary before the actual release Leap 42.3 at the end of July.

The next minor version of Leap 42.3 is mostly a refresh and hardware enablement release that will have more than 10,000 packages. While the development version of Leap 42.3 it is still considerably stable because it is extremely hardened and shares sources from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12, the release could still use more testing and people willing to promote openSUSE’s next minor 42 series version.

Nussel said SLE 12 Service Pack 3 (SP3) and Leap 42.3 are developed in parallel to one another and both benefit from mutual bug reports.

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Introducing Kubic Project: a new open-source project

May 29th, 2017 by

Recent years have seen tremendous growth in the container technologies market. From being a non-existent category just a few years ago to being one of the most interesting, fast development and exciting areas.

Containers change the way we think about application architecture and the speed at which we can deliver on business requirements. They provide consistency and portability across environments and allow developers to focus on building a great product, without the distraction of underlying execution details.

Today the entire application delivery supply chain is changing as the age of abstract application creation is upon us. This change is fueled by the adoption of a few key technologies,  including shared code repositories, continuous integration, continuous development, and cloud computing.  However, the ultimate driver of this movement is a software delivery mechanism: containers.

Project Kubic is a generic project for the many new initiatives related to re-designing the operating system around principles of immutable infrastructure and the usage of a stack based on Linux, docker project and Kubernetes.  The primary building block of the Kubic Project is the Container Host OS based on openSUSE Tumbleweed.

In the near future and with your support, we’ll be enabling Kubernetes and many other new features. This will allow you to easily build Container as a Service (CaaS) solutions and run them everywhere…

How can the Kubic Project help me?

  •  Traditional OS are cool and fun to hack on, but the model with a single runtime environment controlled by the OS and shared by all applications does not meet the requirements of modern application-centric IT.
  • Based on a monolithic approach, the traditional OS brings lots of challenges for managing the stacks running on top of it. With Kubic, we would like to rethink the OS by redesigning it for modern IT applications.
  • In agile environments, developers and DevOps engineers are taking responsibilities over their app and seeking control over the runtime underneath their applications, without necessarily owning the entire stack.
  • VMs provide a means for separation among applications, but this model adds resource and management overhead.

Join our Kubic Project and together we will build the next generation of Container OS

Useful information:

(This blog is written by Simona Arsene and was originally published at https://www.suse.com/communities/blog/introducing-kubic-project-new-open-source-project/)

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Conference Talks Uploaded, Stream is Live

May 27th, 2017 by

This year’s openSUSE Conference has so far been a blast and the talks  from Day 1 of the conference have already been uploaded to the openSUSETV YouTube channel.

For the people who couldn’t make it to this year’s conference, they can watch the live stream of the conference at http://streaming.media.ccc.de/osc17/. There are two rooms (Galerie and Saal) being live streamed and recorded.

Starting out the conference, Matthias Kirschner, President of Free Software Foundation Europe, delivered a terrific keynote and gave several thought provoking questions about who will be the torchbearer for open-source software and questioned whether it is necessary to have a torchbearer since there are so many examples of success of open-source software.

Chief Technology Officer and co-founder of SaltStack, Thomas Hatch, gave a great keynote today and yesterday gave a talk about “My Move to SUSE.”

Thorsten Kukuk introduced openSUSE Kubic as a project under the openSUSE Project and Leap release manager Ludwig Nussel touched on the status of Leap; past, present and future.

Another great talk recommended for system administrators and developers from the  open-source community is Wolfgang Engel’s talk about SUSE Package Hub and how SUSE is bringing community packages to enterprise users.