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Indonesia uses Linux, openSUSE for pilot project

May 27th, 2015 by

An estimated 45,000 students from a province in Indonesia have enhanced their education and computer-usage knowledge through a pilot  program using Linux and openSUSE that is expected to become a nationwide educational program.

From 2009 to 2014, the project called “Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Utilization for Educational Quality Enhancement in Yogyakarta Province” used openSUSE and created material with Linux to enhance educational quality and equality in Yogyakarta Province schools.

“More and more education people and officials come to Yogyakarta to learn about how to implement information technology in basic education,” said Mr. Mohammad Edwin Zakaria, an IT and Linux consultant for the program.

The program is expected to become a model of ICT utilization in the educational sector of Indonesia, Zakaria said. The pilot’s goal supports teaching and learning activities by providing ICT-based learning facilities, providing equipment, communication and network facilities, creating e-learning systems and developments, and by providing tools and support that are needed for schools activities to improve educational quality.

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Official 13.1 Docker Containers Released

August 7th, 2014 by

We are proud to announce official Docker containers for our latest openSUSE release, 13.1. Docker is an open-source project that automates the deployment of applications inside software containers. With the official openSUSE Docker containers it’s now easy for developers to leverage the power of our Linux distribution and it’s free software Eco-system as base for their applications.

openSUSE + Docker == Awesome

The Docker project was released in March last year. Until now, during this short amount of time, more than 450 people contributed with patches and 14,000 containers have been published on its central index. Docker recently released version 1.0, the first one declared enterprise-ready.

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openSUSE ARM Gets new Raspberry Pi Images

September 9th, 2013 by
Raspberry Pi in action

Sadly, the sticker doesn’t fit…

Over the weekend, Bernhard Wiedemann has been working on new armv6 based images for the Raspberry Pi. It is built using a set of alternative build scripts aiming to make the building of the image easier. He’s put the scripts as well as an image online, you can get it from oSC or here (image) and here (scripts). If you’re playing around with Raspberry Pi and want to create images for your device(s), this is for you!

The Image and Building It

As Bernhard explains on his blog, the image he created is only 82mb compressed, so it is pretty minimalistic. The image also contains the scripts he created for building under /home/abuild/rpmbuild/SOURCES/.

If you’re interested in playing with the building itself, creating custom images, the following commands will get you going:
osc co devel:ARM:Factory:Contrib:RaspberryPi altimagebuild
cd devel:ARM:Factory:Contrib:RaspberryPi/altimagebuild
bash -x main.sh

He notes: If you have 6GB RAM, you can speed things up with export OSC_BUILD_ROOT=/dev/shm/arm before you do.

This package doesn’t build in OBS or with just the osc command as it requires root permissions for some steps. That is why you have to run it by hand and let it do its magic. The under-250-lines of script will go through the following steps:

  1. First, osc build is used to pull in required packages and setup the armv6 rootfs.
  2. Second, mkrootfs.sh modifies a copy of the rootfs under .root to contain all required configs
  3. And finally, mkimage.sh takes the .root dir and creates a .img from it that can be booted

Bernhard claims that: “this can build an image from scatch in three minutes. And my Raspberry Pi booted successfully with it within 55 seconds.

Todo and Open Issues

He also points out some remaining open issues:

  • the repo key is initially untrusted
  • still uses old 3.1 kernel
  • build scripts have no error handling

Compared to the old image, this one has some advantages:

  • It is easier to resize as the root partition is the last one
  • Compressed image is much smaller
  • Reproducible image build, so easy to customize
  • It is armv6 with floating point support, so could be faster
  • We have 5200 successfully built packages from openSUSE:Factory:ARM

If you wanted to play with building images for the Raspberry Pi, this might well be the easiest way doing so! And as always, merge requests are very much welcome.

Have a lot of fun

About ARMv7 progress and ARMing for AArch64

April 15th, 2013 by

openSUSE 12.3 introduced the 32bit ARMv7 architecture as new, fully supported architecture and brought experimental 64bit ARM (AArch64) images. Since the release, support for new hardware was added and more build power brought to the Open Build Service. And as far as we can tell, we now have the first large scale KVM deployment on ARM! We also introduce support for the Calxeda Highbank ARM server SoC, a major step forward for both ARM and openSUSE. Read on for details on where the openSUSE ARMy is going. (more…)

Opening the Can: initial support for openSUSE on the ARM Chromebook

January 8th, 2013 by


According to ZDnet, “Amazon’s top selling laptop doesn’t run Windows or Mac OS, it runs Linux”. And that top selling device is the Samsung Series 3 Chromebook. Billed as an ideal second computer just aiming to make it simple to access online services, without the hassle and risk of running another full Windows machine. These devices drop all of the cruft that has accompanied regular laptops on their journey from the swamps, and have just enough local storage to boot a Linux kernel and a stripped down OS based around Google’s Chrome browser, making them thin, light and affordable. And now, we’ve done something cool with it… (more…)

openSUSE Medical Project searches for new Leadership and other participation

October 31st, 2011 by

Hello Mates! openSUSE Medical here!

Well i would to announce that “openSUSE Medical Calling and also needs you”

a) Due to lack of time (i’ve began my Master Studies abroad) i’ve to give up from the project. I think that there are people who are able to lead the project and have more time available.

So “Looking for openSUSE Medical Next Leader”

b) I have created two pages (according to the last meeting’s goals) :

i) “Section Page” : http://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Medical/section.html
ii) “Participate Page” : http://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Medical/participate.html

The process is you have a look at the Sections and then you declare your participation in the “Participate Page” (according to the instructions given in the pages).

So the project needs you for:

a) “The Next Project Leader”

b) “Participants for the Sections”

Anyone interested in (a) or (b) can reply to this e-mail or can post an e- mail to the opensuse-medical@opensuse.org

Rousiopoulos Athanasios-Ilias

New Leadership inside the Medical Project

June 9th, 2011 by

During the first openSUSE Conference in 2009, the idea was born to start a project to package and publish software for medical purposes. Since then, many packages were built and updated: software from the FreeMedForms project, OpenEMR, GnuMed, software for viewing images in DICOMM format and recently, a plasmoid for diabetics.

The first stable release (v 0.0.6) was released on November 2010, based on openSUSE 11.3 and as contestant in the “The Disters“-Contest. This release was produced with SUSE Studio, and published via SUSE Gallery.

The goal of this openSUSE derivative was to give medical people all they need in their daily work. So the image contained OpenOffice, KMyMoney, mail, calendering and all other basic office tools. And of course the content from the medical repository. There was some press attention in Linux Weekly News andLinuxtoday!

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Smeegol at oSC

October 23rd, 2010 by
Meeks and Wafaa

Meeks and Wafaa

Wednesday at the conference, Smeegol master Andrew “Funkypenguin” Wafaa was given the stage by Michael Meeks who was supposed to talk about MeeGo. Meeks claimed that he’d rather have someone on the stage who actually knew what he was talking about, hence Andrew had to explain himself to the audience.

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Announcing Smeegol 1.0

October 6th, 2010 by

The openSUSE Goblin Team are pleased to announce the first public release of Smeegol.
Meego with a touch of Geeko
Smeegol is based on the netbook user interface that came from the MeeGo(TM)* project. Smeegol offers the latest Banshee’s powerful music player, a newer Evolution Express as mail and agenda client and several additional social networks.

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Reminder: first openSUSE Medical Team Meeting

February 5th, 2010 by

The first openSUSE-Medical Team meeting will take place tomorrow (Saturday February 6) at 14:00 UTC. As always, the meeting will be held in IRC on the #opensuse-medical channel on Freenode.

Please add your topics to the meeting wiki page at:

http://en.opensuse.org/OpenSUSE-Medical/Meetings

We using for our Meeting the Meetbot. Please check http://wiki.debian.org/MeetBot for the commands.

Please add topics as soon as possible. Also, if you have questions for the meeting, but can’t attend (we know that the meeting times can’t work for everyone) please add them to the agenda as well.

For more on IRC meetings, see: http://en.opensuse.org/Meetings/About.

As always, we meet in #opensuse-medical on Freenode. Fire up your favorite IRC client and head over to #opensuse-medical.

Not familiar with IRC? A good overview can be found at irchelp.org. This site is not affiliated with openSUSE. For more information on Freenode, see http://freenode.net/.

Wondering what meeting times are? Check the openSUSE Meetings page. All project meetings and team meetings should be listed there.

on IRC meetings, see: http://en.opensuse.org/Meetings/About.