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Tumbleweed Snapshots Are Steadily Rolling

February 21st, 2019 by

Four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot were released this week bringing updates for Kerberos, GNOME, KDE, YaST and Mozilla Firefox.

The latest snapshot of the week, 20190219, had more than a dozen packages updated. A new Kerberos database module using the Lightning Memory-Mapped Database library (LMDB) has was added with the krb5 1.17 package, which brought some major changes for the administration experience for the network authentication protocol Kerberos. The permissions package update 20190212 removed several old entries and the kernel-space and user-space code package tgt 1.0.74 fixed builds with the newer glibc. A couple xf86 packages were updated. The 1.4.0 version of xf86-video-chips was a bug fix release for X.Org Server. There was an X Server crash bug with the version 1.3 affecting devices older than the HiQVideo generation. The change log said the code may not compile against X Server 1.20 since it no longer supports 24-bit color. A few other YaST packages were updated in the snapshot like yast2-installation 4.1.36, which had an update that saves the used repositories at the end of installation so as not to offer the driver packages again.

The 20190217 snapshot had just three packages updated. The keyboard management library libgnomekbd 3.26.1 fixed a build with new GLib and updated translations. VMcore extraction tool makedumpfile 1.6.5 added some patches, bug fixes and improved support for arm64 systems with Kernel Address Space Layout Randomization (KASLR). The jump in the release of yast2-storage-ng from 4.1.53 to 4.1.59 provided quite a few changes like allowing the partitioner to create block cache (bcache) devices without a caching set and the newest version limits bcache support to x86_64.

The 20190215 snapshot finished the updates of KDE Applications 18.12.2 and KDE Frameworks 5.55.0, which started in the snapshot the day before. Multiple packages were updated in KDE Frameworks 5.55.0. Breeze Icons added a preferences-desktop-effects icon, KIO improved keyboard controls of the checksum widget, KTextEditor added a cancel button to stop long-running tasks in the search bar and KWayland added rows info to the plasma virtual desktop protocol. KDE Applications 18.12.2 had more than a dozen recorded bug fixes include improvements to Kontact, Ark, Konsole, Lokalize, Umbrello, and others. The address book now remembers birthdays when merging contacts from a bug fix with kdepim-addons and Ark no longer deletes files saved from inside the embedded viewer. An update to autoyast2 4.1.1 for the installation made changes to the reading of the IPv6 setting in order to initialize it correctly. Unit test were made in the libstorage-ng 4.1.88 package and it also had a change to detect Direct-Access Storage Devices (DASD) using virtio-blk. The python-cairocffi 0.9.0 package dropped Python 3.2 and 3.3 support. Several other YaST packages were updated in the snapshot including yast2-bootloader 4.1.17, yast2-configuration-management 4.1.3, yast2-firstboot 4.1.5 and yast2-network 4.1.39.

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Kubic is now a certified Kubernetes distribution

January 24th, 2019 by

Published by Richard Brown on Jan 22, 2019 on kubic.opensuse.org

Certified Kubernetes

The openSUSE Kubic team is proud to announce that as of yesterday, our Kubic distribution has become a Certified Kubernetes Distribution! Notably, it is the first open source Kubernetes distribution to be certified using the CRI-O container runtime!

What is Kubernetes Certification?

Container technologies in general, and Kubernetes in particular, are becoming increasingly common and widely adopted by enthusiasts, developers, and companies across the globe. A large ecosystem of software and solutions is evolving around these technologies. More and more developers are thinking “Cloud Native” and producing their software in containers first, often targeting Kubernetes as their intended platform for orchestrating those containers. And put bluntly, they want their software to work.

But Kubernetes isn’t like some other software with this sort of broad adoption. Even though it’s being used in scenarios large and small, from small developer labs to large production infrastructure systems, Kubernetes is still a fast-moving project, with new versions appearing very often and a support lifespan shorter than other similar projects. This presents real challenges for people who want to download, deploy and run Kubernetes clusters and know they can run the things they want on top of it.

When you consider the fast moving codebase and the diverse range of solutions providing or integrating with Kubernetes, that is a lot of moving parts provided by a lot of people. That can feel risky to some people, and lead to doubt that something built for Kubernetes today might not work tomorrow.

Thankfully, this a problem the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is tackling. The CNCF helps to build a community around open source container software, and established the Kubernetes Software Conformance Certification to further that goal. Certified Kubernetes solutions are validated by the CNCF. They check that versions, APIs, and such are all correct, present, and working as expected so users and developers can be assured their Kubernetes-based solutions will work with ease, now and into the future.

 

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