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GNOME, LLVM, Samba, Ruby Packages Update in Tumbleweed

October 24th, 2019 by

Two openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week that updated several libraries as well as updates for GNOME, Ruby, Samba, Mozilla and the LLVM compiler.

Snapshot 20191018 provided minor updates for both Mozilla Firefox 69.0.3 and Thunderbird 68.1.2. The update to Firefox fixed a bug that prompted Yahoo mail users to download files when clicking on emails and the Thunderbird update fixed some glitches and fixed the address book import from a CSV. GNOME software updated to version 3.34,which could be the version that will come in openSUSE Leap 15.2. GNOME’s Thessaloniki release includes visual refreshes for a number of applications and the background selection settings also received a redesign, making it easier to select custom backgrounds. Developers using GNOME 3.34 will notices more data sources in Sysprof that make performance profiling of applications easier. Improvements to Builder include an integrated D-Bus inspector. Javascript bindings for GNOME were also updated with the gjs 1.58.1 version and gtk3 3.24.12 fixed a pointer offsets under X11 and Wayland. Python2 runtime support was removed with the updated of the samba 4.11.0 package; python 3.4 or later is required.

Also in the 20191018 snapshot was an update for the new programing language vala 0.46.3 that focuses on GNOME developers had multiple additions to the package. Programing language ruby 2.6.5 fixed a code injection vulnerability along with three other Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. openSUSE’s snapper 0.8.5 package updated to allow trailing comments in configuration files. The Linux Kernel updated to 5.3.6. NetworkManager 1.18.4 improved the handling of externally added policy routing rules and for rules that are taken over after a restart of a NetworkManager service. The NetworkManager-applet 1.8.24 package added support for SAE authentication (WPA3 Personal). Fix regression fixes were made in both the 2.62.1 versions of glib2 and glib-networking; the latter also made two memory leak fixes. Other noteworthy packages that were updated in the snapshot were webkit2gtk3 2.26.1, libsoup 2.68.2, grilo 0.3.10, and dconf 0.34.0. The snapshot is trending at a stable rating of 92, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Most of the package updates for the 20191016 snapshot were YaST2 packages. A crash caused by a widget method was fixed in yast2-network 4.2.23 and at least 10 languages were updated in the yast2-trans package. People can contribute to the project by translating via openSUSE’s Weblate instance. There were about a handful of other packages updated in the snapshot, but the biggest one to note is a new major version of llvm9. The new major version of the compiler require only a python3-base instead of the full python3 packages. The LLVM optimizer will now convert calls to memcmp into a calls to bcmp in some circumstances. The major version also no longer views the RISCV target as “experimental.” It’s now built by default, rather than needing to be enabled with LLVM_EXPERIMENTAL_TARGETS_TO_BUILD. The snapshot recorded a stable rating of 91, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE to have Summit in Dublin

October 16th, 2019 by

The openSUSE Community is going to Ireland March 27 and 28, 2020, for openSUSE Summit Dublin.

Registration for the summit has begun and the Call for Papers is open until Feb. 14.

The summit will begin at the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encouraged to register for the summit and submit a talk.

The schedule for the openSUSE Summit Dublin will be posted on Feb. 17.

There is an openSUSE and open source track. There are three talks that can be submitted for the summit. One is a short talk with a 15-minute limit;a normal talk with a with a 30-minute limit and a long talk with a 45-minute limit.

Attendees of SUSECON are welcome to attend and submit talks. openSUSE Summit Dublin is a free community event that will take place on the last day of SUSECON and the Saturday that follows SUSECON.

Contact ddemaio (@) opensuse.org if you have any questions concerning the summit.

KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.17, Qt 5.14 and more

October 10th, 2019 by

It’s been way too long since the last blog post, so we’ve got quite a lot to report on!

Plasma 5.17 Beta

The Beta version of Plasma 5.17 was released with many new features and improvements such as per-screen fractional scaling on Wayland, a new User Interface (UI) for configuring permissions of Thunderbolt devices and network statistics in KSysGuard. The latter requires some more privileges than usual for a user application, so is currently being looked at by the SUSE security team.

openQA found a few bugs already, like GIMP looking more “colorful” than usual and some applications mixing Kirigami and Qt Widgets breaking some keyboard shortcuts. Both of those were addressed meanwhile and will be fixed in the final release of 5.17.

If you haven’t tested the Plasma 5.17 Beta yet, there’s still some time left! If you come across a problem in the software, please head over to the KDE bug tracker; if instead you find an issue that is openSUSE specific, go over to the openSUSE bugzilla.

To get it on your Leap or Tumbleweed installation, you can read https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:KDE_repositories.

In case you face some severe issues, the automatic snapshotting of the root filesystem using btrfs has your back and you can simply go back to the working state by booting into an older snapshot and doing a rollback.

Argon, an installable live medium that includes Leap 15.1 with the Beta and doesn’t require any manual repository addition, is also available.

openSUSE Leap 15.2

Like it happened for Leap 42.2, 15.2 will also see major version upgrades of many components.

Next to a new version of the Linux kernel, it’s planned to ship with Qt 5.12 LTS, Plasma 5.18 (of course also LTS) and the latest KDE Frameworks and Applications, which we can get in early enough for proper testing to ensure the best user experience possible!

This means that the “Full Wayland” session that landed in Tumbleweed a few weeks ago will also be available in Leap 15.2 and support per-screen fractional scaling.

As the target versions of Applications, Frameworks and Plasma aren’t even out yet, we’re currently integrating Qt 5.12 LTS with the latest packages from Factory.

Qt 5.14

Users of Tumbleweed and Leap with newer KDE software are used to having the latest available features and bugfixes, which is only possible by keeping up with Qt development and acting proactively.

So while the 5.14 branch of Qt is still young, we’re already busy integrating it into our builds. During the initial packaging of the 5.14 Alpha some bugs (QTBUG-78867, QTBUG-78881, QTBUG-78911, QTBUG-78948) were already identified and most of them fixed by now, so the KDE:Qt:5.14 project is built and usable by now. To develop against Qt 5.14 and test your applications with it, you can add the repo and get started.

So far it’s still in the phase of integration and getting everything in shape to build against it, but soon we’ll submit it to the Factory staging area to see how it behaves in there.

One of the most user visible features is that the implementation for scaling (for HiDPI displays) was mostly rewritten. Other noteworthy changes are the addition of various backends for hardware acceleration of Qt Quick using a new abstraction layer (opt-in), which can now also take advantage of Vulkan and introduction of a new “qtquicktimeline” module, which allows for easier integration of timeline-driven animations into Qt Quick.

New 4.0.2 Version of Uyuni is Released

August 2nd, 2019 by

Contributors of Uyuni Project have released a new version of Uyuni 4.0.2, which is an open-source infrastructure management solution tailored for software-defined infrastructure.

Uyuni, a fork of the Spacewalk project, modernizing Spacewalk with SaltStack, provides more operating systems support and better scalability capabilities. Uyuni is now the upstream for SUSE Manager.

With this release, Uyuni provides powerful new features such as monitoring, content lifecycle management and virtual machine management.

Both the Uyuni Server node and the optional proxy nodes work on top of openSUSE Leap 15.1 and support Leap 15.1, CentOS, Ubuntu and others as clients. Debian support is experimental. The new version of Uyuni uses Salt 2019.2, Grafana 6.2.5, Cobbler 3.0 and Python 3.6 in the backend.

“The upgrade involves the complete replacement of the underlying operating system,” according to a post on July 9 by Hubert Mantel on Github. “This is a very critical operation and it is impossible to handle any potential failure in a graceful way. For example, an error during upgrade of the base OS might lead to a completely broken system which cannot be recovered.

Given that the upgrade of Uyuni also involves upgrading the base operating system from Leap 42.3 to Leap 15.1, it is highly advisable to create a backup of the server before running the migration. If the Uyuni server is running in a virtual machine, it is recommended to take a snapshot of the machine before running the migration.

Migration is performed by first updating the susemanager package:

zypper ref && zypper in susemanager

Then run the migration script:

/usr/lib/susemanager/bin/server-migrator.sh

“This script will stop the services, subscribe the new software repositories and finally perform the actual update to the new version,” Mantel wrote on Github. “After successful migration, services will not be started automatically. The system needs to be rebooted and this will also re-start all the services. There is nothing additional the admin needs to do.”

The intention of the fork was to provide new inspiration to a Spacewalk, which had been perceived as idling in recent years. Uyuni is using Salt for configuration management, thereby inheriting its name: Uyuni refers to the world’s largest Salt flat, Salar de Uyuni in Southwest Bolivia.

Interested members can follow the project on https://github.com/uyuni-project, www.uyuni-project.org, via Twitter at @UyuniProject, or join #uyuni at irc.freenode.org.

Tumbleweed’s July Snapshots Are Trending Strong

July 11th, 2019 by

There have been a total of five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots since the beginning of July and all the snapshots have a strong, stable rating.

The rolling release had the most updates arrive in the 20190702 snapshot. The packages update in that snapshot included Mesa 19.1.1 and Mesa-drivers 19.1.1 that had fixes for Intel ANV and AMD RADV driver as well as Nouveau and R300 Gallium3D drivers. The bzip2 file compression application fixed undefined behavior in the macros in version 1.0.7 and fixed a low impact Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE). The programing language package guilef was updated to version 2.2.5 and provided bootstrap optimization. Portability improvements were made in the library for encryption, decryption, signatures and password hashing with libsodium 1.0.18. A major release of the PulseAudio’s Volume Control package pavucontrol 4.0 was made; the new version dropped support for Gtk+ 2 and added more than a handful of new language translations.

The most recent snapshot, 20190708, didn’t offer a changelog due to the server that the web app uses to produce the changelogs being upgraded to Leap 15.1. The changelog is expected to be included in the next snapshot that is released.

Just two packages were updated in the 20190704 snapshot. The newer vhba-kmp file system package from April 2019 fixed a crash when mounting disk image with the 5.1 Linux Kernel. The vm-install 0.10.07 package, which is a tool to define a Virtual Machine and Install Its Operating System, addressed the use of the ‘builder’ option in the config file that produces an error because it is deprecated.

The first snapshot of the month, 20190701, didn’t provide any new package releases, but there were some changes made to a few packages like the one to llvm8 (Low Level Virtual Machine) that increase RAM for armv6/7 to avoid the undesirable state of Out of memory (OOM). A patch was also dropped from the same package.

A few package updates were made available in the 20190703 snapshot. The Linux Kernel was updated to 5.1.15. The updated kernel offered some fixes for mediatek MultiMediaCard (MMC) flow and detection issues and it enabled System Management Bus (SMBus) on Lenovo ThinkPad E480 and E580. KDE’s Hex editor for viewing and editing binary files okteta 0.26.2 improved the maximum array size in structures extended to 64K.

All snapshots released this month so far have recorded a stable rating of 93 or higher, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE Community Releases Leap 15.1 Version

May 22nd, 2019 by

Leap 15.1 Supports More Hardware, Drivers, Enhances Installation

EN / CA / DE / FR / IT / ES / JA / NL / PL / ZH / ZH-TW

22/05/2019

NUREMBERG, Germany – Today’s release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings professional users, entrepreneurs and Independent Software Vendors updated support for modern hardware.

The release of Leap 15.1 improves YaST functionality and the installer.

“Continuity and stability are what we are providing users with Leap 15.1,” said Haris Sehic, a member of the openSUSE community. “With Leap 15, we have introduced a huge number of new features and innovations in security, performance and tool/desktop area. Having in mind how stable, efficient and reliable Leap has become, with this release, we managed to keep the level of quality to the point that our private and Small Business users can, actually more than ever, profit from the enterprise background of an openSUSE Linux Distribution. Let’s continue to have a lot of fun!”

Leap releases are scalable and both the desktop and server are equally important for professional’s workloads, which is reflected in the installation menu as well as the amount of packages Leap offers and hardware it supports. Leap is well suited and prepared for usage as a Virtual Machine (VM) or container guest, allowing professional users to efficiently run network services no matter whether it’s a single server or a data center.

Professional users, system administrators and developers can have confidence in the reliability of the Leap distribution based on its development process to deliver a modern, secure, maintained and highly tested distribution using the open-source build system unique to both SUSE and openSUSE, which is the Open Build Service, along with the automated testing of openQA.

What’s New

An entirely new graphics stack update is available for this stable community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution. Graphics hardware supported by the 4.19 Linux Kernel were backported for the release of Leap 15.1, which uses the 4.12 Linux Kernel and supports additional graphics drivers for Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and improved support for AMD Vega chipset.

GPU virtualization has become quite popular among vendors like AMD, Intel and Nvidia and Leap 15.1 helps to delivers these implementation and support solutions for virtualized and cloud environments.

Leap 15.1 will now use Network Manager by default for both laptops and desktops – previously only laptops defaulted to Network Manager. Server installations will continue to default to Wicked, the openSUSE advanced network configuration system. The release adds a few popular WiFi drivers for more modern wireless chipsets. A change that applies to both Wicked and Network Manager is that /etc/resolv.conf, yp.conf and some other files are a link to a file in /run and are managed by netconfig.

The management of system services in YaST has been revamped to take advantage of many of the features offered by systemd in that area.

Improved Setup and Configuration

Some of the improvements to YaST have made for better management of services. Firewalld can be managed in text mode. There is a new User Interface to manage Firewalld, including AutoYaST support/advancements. System administrators will have better control with Salt formulas in the yast2-configuration-management module, and management of SSH keys per user will make sysadmins tasks much more pleasant.

YaST comes with an improved Partitioner, that now can automatically format full disks without partition tables, create software MD RAIDs on top of full disks, create partitions within a software-defined MD RAID and many other combinations. AutoYaST also supports all these combinations. The work the YaST team has put into the setup and configuration tool has a better default partitioning proposal in several scenarios like those with small disks or systems with several disks making solutions easier for Linux professionals. Leap 15.1 brings new YaST icons developed by the community.

The YaST team worked hard on improving the 4k display (HiDPI) experience. HiDPI displays are now autodetected and the UI is auto-scaled giving the installer a beautifully crisp interface.

Security and Maintenance

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InfinityBook Pro 13 as an important part of the openSUSE reference tests

May 15th, 2019 by

openSUSE and TUXEDO Computers want to offer the best user experience

KÖNIGSBRUNN, Germany — The cooperation between TUXEDO Computers and the openSUSE project has existed since 2018. This has been very successful, so that the release team of openSUSE has received a permanent loan from TUXEDO Computers and has developed and further developed the new version Leap 15.1 on the InfinityBook Pro 13, which will be released soon.

The openSUSE project mainly uses the InfinityBook Pro 13 from the TUXEDO Computers range. It offers numerous configuration options and is characterized by its mobility, runtime, performance, quality and flexibility. The internal tests at openSUSE were consistently positive. Further information and benchmarks can be found in the current joint success story, which is available for download.

TUXEDO Computers at the openSUSE Conference 2019

24th to 26th of May 2019: openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany

From 24th to 26th of May 2019, TUXEDO Computers will be part of the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany. There, the hardware manufacturer from Königsbrunn near Augsburg/Germany will present a selection of current devices. The laptops can be viewed and tested here. Via the TUXEDO Computers online shop, more than 20 devices can be configured according to individual requirements and equipped, for example, with the Linux distribution openSUSE. The openSUSE conference in May is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from all over the world together. Organized lectures, workshops and BoF sessions provide a setting for more informal meetings and hack sessions.

Further information and ticket can be found here: https://events.opensuse.org/conferences/oSC19

Help promote openSUSE Leap 15.1!

April 30th, 2019 by

The release of openSUSE Leap 15.1 is about three weeks away. To help spread the word about the release, we have counters available at counter.opensuse.org and more artwork on https://github.com/openSUSE/artwork/. You can put these items on your social media or blog pages to make sure everybody knows that the Release is Coming!

For you blog and social media accounts

If you want to decorate your blog or website with a nice Leap 15.1 banner, grab one of these:

130×130
256×256
400×400
600×100

 

Release Counter

You can add the openSUSE 15.1 release counter to your website in various sizes by including the following html code in your blog:
<a href="http://en.opensuse.org/Portal:15.1"><img src="http://counter.opensuse.org/medium.png" border="0"/></a><br/>
“medium” is the size of the counter; it can also be “small” or “large” and we also have “wide” for a banner.

See the Countdown page on the openSUSE Wiki for more countdown information, code and tips!

Leap 15.1 Beta Pizza Party

February 22nd, 2019 by

Prosciutto, anchovy and onion pizza.

Hunt for bugs & have a lot of fun!

The release manager for openSUSE Leap announced that Leap 15.1 entered its Beta phase this week and that means it’s time for a Beta Pizza Party. Yeah!.

Leap’s Beta phase is a rolling beta until it’s official release. Once released, it will begin its maintenance phase.

To celebrate the Beta phase, why not have a Pizza Party and test the openSUSE Leap 15.1 Beta.

Geeko in Nuremberg will have a Beta Pizza Party on March 1, 2019 during lunch. Any Beta tester in the Nuremberg area are welcome to attend. Just email ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

If there’s no party near you, organize your own. Be sure to check the wiki page! Pick a local pizza place or get some delivered to your home or office; invite friends and colleagues and put your party on the wiki. A new openSUSE user may show up! If you are unsure of how to do it, read this.

Download the Beta…

Beta’s of Leap 15.1 are available at https://software.opensuse.org/distributions/testing. Install it on a VM, virtualbox or on your hardware. Report or help fix any problems you encounter.
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First Phase for openSUSE Conference Talks Begins

February 13th, 2019 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce the first phase for accepting talks for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19) has begun.

A total of 80 talks were submitted during the call for papers, which began in late fall and ended Feb. 4. In total, there were 42 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 19 short talks and seven lighting talks submitted.

The review team rated all the submitted abstracts and selected 22 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 13 short talks and five lighting talks.

Speakers have been notified of their accepted talk and must confirm their talk by March 1. If a speaker doesn’t confirm their talk by March 1, the talk will be withdrawn and the next highest rated talks will be accepted to fill the slot as part of the second phase of the talk selections for oSC19. Phase 2 will run from March 2 to March 16. The schedule for the conference will be published shortly after Phase 2.

There are five tracks listed for the conference this year. The tracks are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

The openSUSE Conference will take place at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19 or email ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.