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Special Edition Highlights openSUSE, KDE

October 11th, 2017 by

Getting the masses to move to a Linux distribution can be challenging, but the openSUSE Project is doing its part to get people started with open-source software.

Members of the openSUSE community recently worked with Linux Magazine to publish a special edition of a Getting Started With Linux magazine with the purpose of increasing the openSUSE user base and teaching beginners how to make the switch to Linux.

The 100-page special edition focuses on installing openSUSE Leap 42.3, using the installation and configuration tool YaST, understanding security and many other topics specific for Linux beginners.

It also provides a crash course on Linux and goes in depth about the several applications available on Linux distributions and openSUSE’s default desktop selection, which currently is KDE’s Long Term Support version Plasma 5.8. Many of the articles written in the magazine are from community members of both openSUSE and KDE among others.

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SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

October 4th, 2017 by

Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service

Written by Andreas Jaeger

SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

As you may be aware, we have an Open Build Service (OBS) tool that helps you to build packages to deliver complete distributions. In the last few years, we have been updating this tool and it now can handle any kind of image.

Additionally, the default engine for building images at SUSE is kiwi and is used in both SUSE Studio and OBS.

Reviewing these offerings and the way the image build situation has evolved, we have decided to merge the two online services, OBS and SUSE Studio, into a common solution.

Looking at the feature requests for SUSE Studio on image building and looking at our technologies, we decided to use OBS as the base for our image building service. Since OBS already builds images for various environments, we will first add a new image building GUI to OBS. This combined solution will now be delivered as “SUSE Studio Express”.

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openSUSE Leap 42.3 Cloud Images Become Available

August 22nd, 2017 by

Cloud images for openSUSE Leap 42.3 are now available for Azure, Google Compute Engine and more cloud providers.

The images for Amazon Web Services (AWS EC2) are expected to arrive soon as they were recently submitted for review by the AWS Marketplace team.

“Compared to openSUSE Leap 42.2 we were in much better shape releasing two of three images on release date (GCE and Azure) and even the delayed image was released much closer to release date than the 42.2 release,” Robert Schweikert wrote on Google Plus.

End users can choose the cloud service provider that best fits their usage model.

Leap ships with tools for uploading and managing images. The tools allow for uploading, publishing, deleting and deprecating images.

There are a couple of known things not working at the moment like the “gcloud” command in the GCE image and the automatic hostname setting in the GCE image,

Both will be worked on as time permits, Schweikert wrote.

Cloud images of openSUSE have been available in for years and users can run Docker containers in a Virtual Machine with openSUSE’s cloud image; this has been tested with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12, which shares a common core with openSUSE Leap.

Since releasing openSUSE Leap 42.2 in the AWS Marketplace, around mid January, roughly 220 subscribers are running openSUSE Leap. AWS customers have an opportunity to use openSUSE’s community software on AWS without any hourly-software instance charge.

Refresh of Linux Distribution Continues Leveraging Community, Enterprise Benefits

July 26th, 2017 by

(Languages: DE, ES, FR, IT, ZH, zh_TW)

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Gives Smooth Desktop and Server UpgradeLeap-green.png

The openSUSE Project released openSUSE Leap 42.3 today bringing the community version more closely aligned with its shared core of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack 3.

The mutual packages of both Leap and SLE distributions give seasoned Linux users, systems administrators, and developers even more reason to use the newest chameleon distribution.

Users are advised to take advantage of the seamless upgrade to Leap 42.3. Leap 42.2 reaches its end of maintenance in six months.

“By avoiding major version updates in the base system as well as the desktops, the upgrade to Leap 42.3 is a rather unadventurous matter,” said Ludwig Nussel, openSUSE Leap release manager.

The release of Leap 42.3 provides adopters a reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

Leap’s third edition of the 42 series has more than 10,000 packages and offers stability-minded users a refresh and hardware enablement release. The release is powered by the same Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel found in the previous Leap edition.

Leap 42.3 continues to use KDE’s Long-Term-Support release 5.8 as the default desktop selection while also offering GNOME 3.20, the same as used by SUSE Linux Enterprise. A variety of additional desktops is available in the installer through the newly designed desktop selection.

“Leap 42.3 is the culmination of several years of effort integrating SUSE’s Enterprise codebase with the exceptional high-quality work of the openSUSE community,” said Richard Brown, Chairman of the openSUSE Project. “I’m exceptionally proud of what the openSUSE Project has achieved with Leap 42.3 and hope our users appreciate this stable, yet innovative, approach to community Linux, which can really be relied upon to work.”

This release of openSUSE Leap is well suited for servers thanks to its server installation profile and its fully-featured text mode installer, including all the options of YaST without a graphical environment.

System administrators are going to love the backup solution Borg, which now can be used easier than ever thanks to Borgmatic’s wrapper to automatically backup your data daily with a systemd service. Sysadmins will also like Samba’s System Security Services Daemon integration with an Active Directory.

Leap, and the openSUSE project, provides the DevOps tool chain developers need to be successful. Microservices with Leap offer scalability and continuous delivery through the availability of Docker and Kubernetes as well as easy configuration with Salt, Ansible, and other openSUSE technologies. AutoYaST’s new integration with SaltStack and other configuration management systems can take care of the system installation (partitioning, network setup, etc.) and then delegate the system configuration to one of those widely used external tools.

Developers, and businesses can take advantage of extensive core libraries found in Leap 42.3 to build or enhance software for enterprise use. Since Leap and SLE share a common core, development with packages on Leap for use in production on SLE has never been easier. Furthermore, system integrators can develop on Leap with the possibility of getting their work into future SLE releases.

Leap provides the tools, languages and libraries for sustainable software development and engineering. Enterprise ready versions of Python, Ruby, Perl, Go, Rust, Haskell and PHP are all available in Leap.

Updates to the kernel and graphics stack enable more hardware and provide stability and performance improvements.
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Plan A Community Release Party for openSUSE Leap 42.3

July 17th, 2017 by

Many people are anxiously awaiting for the release of openSUSE Leap 42.3 next week, but before the release arrives, you can prepare for a Release Party to celebrate the upcoming achievement with members of the open-source and openSUSE community.

Host your own Release Party. If you don’t know how to do this, there is a list of five steps to have a successful release party. Plus more details are listed below on how to have a fantastic party.

Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires a bit of planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party. If you plan on having a party, email ddemaio (at) suse.de well before the party to get some goodies to hand out to the party people. Please include “Leap 42.3 Party” in the subject line and include a mailing address and phone number.

checklist:

Find a date

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Heroes preparing to make the leap

July 14th, 2017 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoYou might have noticed some normally unwanted activity over the last weeks affecting the openSUSE infrastructure – resulting in reduced availability or downtime of the provided services.

Today we are happy to announce that most of the infrastructure work is done and the openSUSE Heroes together with the SUSE-IT team achieved a lot – ready to welcome openSUSE Leap 42.3 in time!

There might be still the one or the other small issue – but we expect that the majority of services will be stable for now (until we prove something different ;-)

The very good news: while Leap 42.3 is approaching, a couple of machines hosting openSUSE services are already using the latest 42.3 release in production!

That is what we call testing!

So while the Heroes lean back now and let the dust settle for a moment, we are really looking forward to the next steps that are on our TODO  list.

What was done in detail?

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Website About People of openSUSE Ends Hiatus

June 19th, 2017 by

Interviews with people involved in the openSUSE Project have returned and new pages will be added in the future highlighting individuals involved in the community project.

The first interview to be posted after a five-year hiatus was posted in November of 2016 and highlights Dominique Leuenberger, who is at VLC contributor and release manager for openSUSE Tumbleweed.

Sarah Julia Kriesch, who is a Working Student at ownCloud and member of the Heroes team at openSUSE, discusses in an interview in published in March how she got started with Linux and openSUSE.

The most recent interview published is from Leap release manager Ludwig Nussel, who is a volunteer for a fire brigade in Germany.

The website has interviews dating back at 2007; when many people involved in the project had less grey hair;-). Current interviews focus on newer project members. Interviews include many people involved in the project who participate and contribute to many other open-source projects like Linux kernel developer and Tumbleweed originator Greg Kroah-Hartman, former openSUSE Release Manager and KDE Release Coordinator Stephan Kulow and more.

Next Leap 42.3 Snapshot Equates to Release Candidate

June 6th, 2017 by

Rolling Development Still needs Testing, Promoters

Since changing to a rolling development version model for the eventual release of openSUSE Leap 42.3, challenges have arisen to get more people testing it.

There is no milestone releases (Alpha or Beta) for openSUSE Leap 42.3, but snapshots of the development version are constantly being released.

“So far I have not seen too many 42.3 bugs,” said Leap Release Manager Luwdig Nussel in his talk at the openSUSE Conference. “I don’t think we are bug free, so I think it just is not tested enough.”

Some Linux users might find a rolling development process for a Linux release to be less appealing for testing, but testing is certainly necessary before the actual release Leap 42.3 at the end of July.

The next minor version of Leap 42.3 is mostly a refresh and hardware enablement release that will have more than 10,000 packages. While the development version of Leap 42.3 it is still considerably stable because it is extremely hardened and shares sources from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12, the release could still use more testing and people willing to promote openSUSE’s next minor 42 series version.

Nussel said SLE 12 Service Pack 3 (SP3) and Leap 42.3 are developed in parallel to one another and both benefit from mutual bug reports.

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Conference Talks Uploaded, Stream is Live

May 27th, 2017 by

This year’s openSUSE Conference has so far been a blast and the talks  from Day 1 of the conference have already been uploaded to the openSUSETV YouTube channel.

For the people who couldn’t make it to this year’s conference, they can watch the live stream of the conference at http://streaming.media.ccc.de/osc17/. There are two rooms (Galerie and Saal) being live streamed and recorded.

Starting out the conference, Matthias Kirschner, President of Free Software Foundation Europe, delivered a terrific keynote and gave several thought provoking questions about who will be the torchbearer for open-source software and questioned whether it is necessary to have a torchbearer since there are so many examples of success of open-source software.

Chief Technology Officer and co-founder of SaltStack, Thomas Hatch, gave a great keynote today and yesterday gave a talk about “My Move to SUSE.”

Thorsten Kukuk introduced openSUSE Kubic as a project under the openSUSE Project and Leap release manager Ludwig Nussel touched on the status of Leap; past, present and future.

Another great talk recommended for system administrators and developers from the  open-source community is Wolfgang Engel’s talk about SUSE Package Hub and how SUSE is bringing community packages to enterprise users.

 

Enterprise Beta Sources Added to openSUSE Leap 42.3 Build

May 19th, 2017 by

Sources from the beta version of SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) Service Pack 3 (SP3) arrived today in the latest build for openSUSE’s next minor release of the 42 series.

The transition to a rolling development process for openSUSE Leap 42.3 has changed the traditional milestone process, but fixed milestones are alive and well with SLE development and Leap is benefiting from that hardened, enterprise core.

The latest sources from SLE SP3 Beta included in Leap builds are security and bug fixes n SUSEConnect version 0.3.0. Additionally, cpupower updated to a turbostat version with 17.04.12. The shared zypper 1.13.27 version helps to tag packages installed by user request as ‘i+’. The beta and Leap build also cleanup an algorithm for rollback snapshots with Snapper 0.5.0. Ceph’s  12.0.2 sets higher disk and memory constraints so s390x builds don’t fail. SLE SP3 and Leap also share the same 4.4.68 Linux Kernel, which provides plenty of improvements for architectures and wireless drivers.

Yast2-installation moved Container as a Service Platform to yast2-caasp package and added a features request, which added Network Time Protocol Servers settings to the overview dialog.

Community packages differing from SLE SP 3 Beta that testers can find in Leap are new features from Mozilla Thunderbird 52.1.0 and security fix from Mozilla Firefox 52.1.1. This past week KDE Applications was updated in the Leap builds to version 17.04.0. Two weeks ago, a Leap build for 42.3 updated Mesa from version 11.2.2 to version 17.0.4 (now Mesa 17.0.5), so more Graphics Processing Units are supported.

“I’d like to ask package maintainers and users alike to check whether there are any bigger changes left to be done in 42.3,” release manager Ludwig Nussel wrote to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List. “If so, please submit affected packages ASAP.”

There are only a few more days left to get any major version updates in the next minor Leap 42 version. All major version updates have a submission deadline of May 21.

Leap 42.3 builds have been coming out on a regular basis with new community packages being updated in the newest builds. Testers are encouraged to test the rolling development and can download the iso image from the development button on software.opensuse.org. After installing Leap, testers can enter the terminal and enter zypper update for the newest Leap 42.3 packages.

Don’t forget to report bugs if you find one.