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Tumbleweed’s July Snapshots Are Trending Strong

July 11th, 2019 by

There have been a total of five openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots since the beginning of July and all the snapshots have a strong, stable rating.

The rolling release had the most updates arrive in the 20190702 snapshot. The packages update in that snapshot included Mesa 19.1.1 and Mesa-drivers 19.1.1 that had fixes for Intel ANV and AMD RADV driver as well as Nouveau and R300 Gallium3D drivers. The bzip2 file compression application fixed undefined behavior in the macros in version 1.0.7 and fixed a low impact Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE). The programing language package guilef was updated to version 2.2.5 and provided bootstrap optimization. Portability improvements were made in the library for encryption, decryption, signatures and password hashing with libsodium 1.0.18. A major release of the PulseAudio’s Volume Control package pavucontrol 4.0 was made; the new version dropped support for Gtk+ 2 and added more than a handful of new language translations.

The most recent snapshot, 20190708, didn’t offer a changelog due to the server that the web app uses to produce the changelogs being upgraded to Leap 15.1. The changelog is expected to be included in the next snapshot that is released.

Just two packages were updated in the 20190704 snapshot. The newer vhba-kmp file system package from April 2019 fixed a crash when mounting disk image with the 5.1 Linux Kernel. The vm-install 0.10.07 package, which is a tool to define a Virtual Machine and Install Its Operating System, addressed the use of the ‘builder’ option in the config file that produces an error because it is deprecated.

The first snapshot of the month, 20190701, didn’t provide any new package releases, but there were some changes made to a few packages like the one to llvm8 (Low Level Virtual Machine) that increase RAM for armv6/7 to avoid the undesirable state of Out of memory (OOM). A patch was also dropped from the same package.

A few package updates were made available in the 20190703 snapshot. The Linux Kernel was updated to 5.1.15. The updated kernel offered some fixes for mediatek MultiMediaCard (MMC) flow and detection issues and it enabled System Management Bus (SMBus) on Lenovo ThinkPad E480 and E580. KDE’s Hex editor for viewing and editing binary files okteta 0.26.2 improved the maximum array size in structures extended to 64K.

All snapshots released this month so far have recorded a stable rating of 93 or higher, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE Community Releases Leap 15.1 Version

May 22nd, 2019 by

Leap 15.1 Supports More Hardware, Drivers, Enhances Installation

EN / CA / DE / FR / IT / ES / JA / NL / PL / ZH / ZH-TW

22/05/2019

NUREMBERG, Germany – Today’s release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings professional users, entrepreneurs and Independent Software Vendors updated support for modern hardware.

The release of Leap 15.1 improves YaST functionality and the installer.

“Continuity and stability are what we are providing users with Leap 15.1,” said Haris Sehic, a member of the openSUSE community. “With Leap 15, we have introduced a huge number of new features and innovations in security, performance and tool/desktop area. Having in mind how stable, efficient and reliable Leap has become, with this release, we managed to keep the level of quality to the point that our private and Small Business users can, actually more than ever, profit from the enterprise background of an openSUSE Linux Distribution. Let’s continue to have a lot of fun!”

Leap releases are scalable and both the desktop and server are equally important for professional’s workloads, which is reflected in the installation menu as well as the amount of packages Leap offers and hardware it supports. Leap is well suited and prepared for usage as a Virtual Machine (VM) or container guest, allowing professional users to efficiently run network services no matter whether it’s a single server or a data center.

Professional users, system administrators and developers can have confidence in the reliability of the Leap distribution based on its development process to deliver a modern, secure, maintained and highly tested distribution using the open-source build system unique to both SUSE and openSUSE, which is the Open Build Service, along with the automated testing of openQA.

What’s New

An entirely new graphics stack update is available for this stable community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution. Graphics hardware supported by the 4.19 Linux Kernel were backported for the release of Leap 15.1, which uses the 4.12 Linux Kernel and supports additional graphics drivers for Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and improved support for AMD Vega chipset.

GPU virtualization has become quite popular among vendors like AMD, Intel and Nvidia and Leap 15.1 helps to delivers these implementation and support solutions for virtualized and cloud environments.

Leap 15.1 will now use Network Manager by default for both laptops and desktops – previously only laptops defaulted to Network Manager. Server installations will continue to default to Wicked, the openSUSE advanced network configuration system. The release adds a few popular WiFi drivers for more modern wireless chipsets. A change that applies to both Wicked and Network Manager is that /etc/resolv.conf, yp.conf and some other files are a link to a file in /run and are managed by netconfig.

The management of system services in YaST has been revamped to take advantage of many of the features offered by systemd in that area.

Improved Setup and Configuration

Some of the improvements to YaST have made for better management of services. Firewalld can be managed in text mode. There is a new User Interface to manage Firewalld, including AutoYaST support/advancements. System administrators will have better control with Salt formulas in the yast2-configuration-management module, and management of SSH keys per user will make sysadmins tasks much more pleasant.

YaST comes with an improved Partitioner, that now can automatically format full disks without partition tables, create software MD RAIDs on top of full disks, create partitions within a software-defined MD RAID and many other combinations. AutoYaST also supports all these combinations. The work the YaST team has put into the setup and configuration tool has a better default partitioning proposal in several scenarios like those with small disks or systems with several disks making solutions easier for Linux professionals. Leap 15.1 brings new YaST icons developed by the community.

The YaST team worked hard on improving the 4k display (HiDPI) experience. HiDPI displays are now autodetected and the UI is auto-scaled giving the installer a beautifully crisp interface.

Security and Maintenance

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InfinityBook Pro 13 as an important part of the openSUSE reference tests

May 15th, 2019 by

openSUSE and TUXEDO Computers want to offer the best user experience

KÖNIGSBRUNN, Germany — The cooperation between TUXEDO Computers and the openSUSE project has existed since 2018. This has been very successful, so that the release team of openSUSE has received a permanent loan from TUXEDO Computers and has developed and further developed the new version Leap 15.1 on the InfinityBook Pro 13, which will be released soon.

The openSUSE project mainly uses the InfinityBook Pro 13 from the TUXEDO Computers range. It offers numerous configuration options and is characterized by its mobility, runtime, performance, quality and flexibility. The internal tests at openSUSE were consistently positive. Further information and benchmarks can be found in the current joint success story, which is available for download.

TUXEDO Computers at the openSUSE Conference 2019

24th to 26th of May 2019: openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany

From 24th to 26th of May 2019, TUXEDO Computers will be part of the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany. There, the hardware manufacturer from Königsbrunn near Augsburg/Germany will present a selection of current devices. The laptops can be viewed and tested here. Via the TUXEDO Computers online shop, more than 20 devices can be configured according to individual requirements and equipped, for example, with the Linux distribution openSUSE. The openSUSE conference in May is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from all over the world together. Organized lectures, workshops and BoF sessions provide a setting for more informal meetings and hack sessions.

Further information and ticket can be found here: https://events.opensuse.org/conferences/oSC19

Help promote openSUSE Leap 15.1!

April 30th, 2019 by

The release of openSUSE Leap 15.1 is about three weeks away. To help spread the word about the release, we have counters available at counter.opensuse.org and more artwork on https://github.com/openSUSE/artwork/. You can put these items on your social media or blog pages to make sure everybody knows that the Release is Coming!

For you blog and social media accounts

If you want to decorate your blog or website with a nice Leap 15.1 banner, grab one of these:

130×130
256×256
400×400
600×100

 

Release Counter

You can add the openSUSE 15.1 release counter to your website in various sizes by including the following html code in your blog:
<a href="http://en.opensuse.org/Portal:15.1"><img src="http://counter.opensuse.org/medium.png" border="0"/></a><br/>
“medium” is the size of the counter; it can also be “small” or “large” and we also have “wide” for a banner.

See the Countdown page on the openSUSE Wiki for more countdown information, code and tips!

Leap 15.1 Beta Pizza Party

February 22nd, 2019 by

Prosciutto, anchovy and onion pizza.

Hunt for bugs & have a lot of fun!

The release manager for openSUSE Leap announced that Leap 15.1 entered its Beta phase this week and that means it’s time for a Beta Pizza Party. Yeah!.

Leap’s Beta phase is a rolling beta until it’s official release. Once released, it will begin its maintenance phase.

To celebrate the Beta phase, why not have a Pizza Party and test the openSUSE Leap 15.1 Beta.

Geeko in Nuremberg will have a Beta Pizza Party on March 1, 2019 during lunch. Any Beta tester in the Nuremberg area are welcome to attend. Just email ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

If there’s no party near you, organize your own. Be sure to check the wiki page! Pick a local pizza place or get some delivered to your home or office; invite friends and colleagues and put your party on the wiki. A new openSUSE user may show up! If you are unsure of how to do it, read this.

Download the Beta…

Beta’s of Leap 15.1 are available at https://software.opensuse.org/distributions/testing. Install it on a VM, virtualbox or on your hardware. Report or help fix any problems you encounter.
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First Phase for openSUSE Conference Talks Begins

February 13th, 2019 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce the first phase for accepting talks for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19) has begun.

A total of 80 talks were submitted during the call for papers, which began in late fall and ended Feb. 4. In total, there were 42 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 19 short talks and seven lighting talks submitted.

The review team rated all the submitted abstracts and selected 22 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 13 short talks and five lighting talks.

Speakers have been notified of their accepted talk and must confirm their talk by March 1. If a speaker doesn’t confirm their talk by March 1, the talk will be withdrawn and the next highest rated talks will be accepted to fill the slot as part of the second phase of the talk selections for oSC19. Phase 2 will run from March 2 to March 16. The schedule for the conference will be published shortly after Phase 2.

There are five tracks listed for the conference this year. The tracks are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

The openSUSE Conference will take place at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19 or email ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

November 8th, 2018 by

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the  openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

Sebastian Riedel and Stephan Kulow have been developing the project for two years and it has been used in production for more than a year and half. The Cavil legal review system replaces an older system and provides much more efficiency. Cavil can automatically accept more than 90 percent of all new requests based on data from previous reviews, so packages are much more streamlined into openSUSE Factory.

The project has been so efficient that two lawyers who do all the legal reviews with the system, which is also used by SUSE, had reviewed about 110,000 packages this past year. The same lawyers curated a library with 27.000 license patterns for 600 licenses and 20 license patterns for 100 of the  most common licenses that are used to create legal reports. Riedel said there is a desire hope to expand that in the future with the hope of collecting new patterns with the open-source community.

The legal Data Base used by SUSE to generate reports with new license patterns  is about 2TB and has about 68.433.436 pattern matches in 27.319.682 individual files.

Like openQA, Cavil is written in Perl, with Mojolicious/Minion and PostgreSQL.

A quick look at the statistics about the content of the legal database showed the most popular open source licenses were GPL-2.0, BSD-3-Clause, GPL-Unspecified and MIT respectively.

KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.14, Qt 5.12 and more

October 17th, 2018 by

Plasma 5.14

Plasma 5.14 was released with many improvements.

It was planned to have it in a released in a Tumbleweed snapshot on the same day, but openQA issues prevented snapshot 20181008 from getting published. Instead, Tumbleweed users got it with snapshot 20181009 on Thursday morning. Currently, 5.14.1 is staged to be accepted in Tumbleweed.

To get it on Leap 15 (and even 42.3 with restrictions), you can add https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:KDE_repositories#KDE_Frameworks_5.2C_Plasma_5_and_Applications. Note that those are not part of the official distribution and therefore not as well supported.

KDE:Unstable drops support for Leap 42.3

The KDE:Unstable projects will drop support for openSUSE 42.3 next week.

Builds of KDE software from git master have been available for Leap 15 even before the official release, which should’ve given everyone enough time to migrate.

The Argon media got switched to Leap 15 just after release as well. If you haven’t heard of Argon (and Krypton) yet, they’re installable live media with the latest version of KDE software on Leap and Tumbleweed.

See the wiki article (https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Argon_and_Krypton) for more information.

Migrating to Leap 15 also means that less system libraries (like libinput) need to be replaced, as the version in Leap 15 is sufficient for now.

If you haven’t migrated to Leap 15 yet, read https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:System_upgrade#Command_line_2. The provided instructions work just fine for the KDE:Unstable repositories.

Goodbye to Webkit (from a default install)

Did you know that two major browsers, Safari and Chromium, are based on KDE software? That’s right, KHTML was used by Apple as foundation when creating the WebKit Browser engine. During the development of Chrome, Google forked WebKit into Blink. (more…)

openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

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