Home Home > Distribution > Leap
Sign up | Login

Archive for the ‘Leap’ Category

openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

November 8th, 2018 by

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the  openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

Sebastian Riedel and Stephan Kulow have been developing the project for two years and it has been used in production for more than a year and half. The Cavil legal review system replaces an older system and provides much more efficiency. Cavil can automatically accept more than 90 percent of all new requests based on data from previous reviews, so packages are much more streamlined into openSUSE Factory.

The project has been so efficient that two lawyers who do all the legal reviews with the system, which is also used by SUSE, had reviewed about 110,000 packages this past year. The same lawyers curated a library with 27.000 license patterns for 600 licenses and 20 license patterns for 100 of the  most common licenses that are used to create legal reports. Riedel said there is a desire hope to expand that in the future with the hope of collecting new patterns with the open-source community.

The legal Data Base used by SUSE to generate reports with new license patterns  is about 2TB and has about 68.433.436 pattern matches in 27.319.682 individual files.

Like openQA, Cavil is written in Perl, with Mojolicious/Minion and PostgreSQL.

A quick look at the statistics about the content of the legal database showed the most popular open source licenses were GPL-2.0, BSD-3-Clause, GPL-Unspecified and MIT respectively.

KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.14, Qt 5.12 and more

October 17th, 2018 by

Plasma 5.14

Plasma 5.14 was released with many improvements.

It was planned to have it in a released in a Tumbleweed snapshot on the same day, but openQA issues prevented snapshot 20181008 from getting published. Instead, Tumbleweed users got it with snapshot 20181009 on Thursday morning. Currently, 5.14.1 is staged to be accepted in Tumbleweed.

To get it on Leap 15 (and even 42.3 with restrictions), you can add https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:KDE_repositories#KDE_Frameworks_5.2C_Plasma_5_and_Applications. Note that those are not part of the official distribution and therefore not as well supported.

KDE:Unstable drops support for Leap 42.3

The KDE:Unstable projects will drop support for openSUSE 42.3 next week.

Builds of KDE software from git master have been available for Leap 15 even before the official release, which should’ve given everyone enough time to migrate.

The Argon media got switched to Leap 15 just after release as well. If you haven’t heard of Argon (and Krypton) yet, they’re installable live media with the latest version of KDE software on Leap and Tumbleweed.

See the wiki article (https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Argon_and_Krypton) for more information.

Migrating to Leap 15 also means that less system libraries (like libinput) need to be replaced, as the version in Leap 15 is sufficient for now.

If you haven’t migrated to Leap 15 yet, read https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:System_upgrade#Command_line_2. The provided instructions work just fine for the KDE:Unstable repositories.

Goodbye to Webkit (from a default install)

Did you know that two major browsers, Safari and Chromium, are based on KDE software? That’s right, KHTML was used by Apple as foundation when creating the WebKit Browser engine. During the development of Chrome, Google forked WebKit into Blink. (more…)

openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

(more…)

openSUSE Leap 42.3 End of Life is Extended

August 8th, 2018 by

The usual lifetime of openSUSE Leap minor versions have traditionally received updates for about 18 months, but the minor version of Leap 42.3 is being extended.

The last minor version of the Leap 42 series was scheduled to be maintained until January 2019, but that has changed thanks to SUSE committing to additional months of maintenance and security updates. Leap 42.3 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack (SP) 3  and SUSE has agreed to keep publishing updates for Leap 42.3 until June 2019.

This means the extended End of Life for Leap 42.3 will increase the total lifetime of the Leap 42 series to 44 months.

Users of the openSUSE Leap 42 series are encouraged to use the additional months to prepare the upgrade to Leap 15, which was released in May.

Those who can’t migrate production servers to the new major version in time may want to take a (commercial) SLE subscription into consideration, which provides even a longer lifecycle. The proximity of Leap 42’s base system to SLE 12 keeps the technical effort to migrate workflows from Leap to SLE low.

 

openSUSE Releases Leap 15 Images for Raspberry Pi, Armv7 Devices

June 14th, 2018 by

The release of openSUSE Leap 15 two weeks ago is following up with its Build to Scale theme by offering images for Raspberry Pis, Beagle Boards, Arndale board, CuBox-i computers, OLinuXino and more.

openSUSE has plenty of supported arm boards to allow makers to simply create. openSUSE is providing makers the tools to start, run and grow a project on micro devices to large hardware.

The new, fresh and hardened code base that supports modern hardware is stable and offers a full scope of deployments.

Makers can leverage openSUSE Leap 15 images for aarch64 and Armv7 on Internet of Things (IoT) and embedded devices. Since openSUSE Leap 15 shares a common core  SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources, makers who find success with a project or device can more comfortably transition to an enterprise product in the future should certifications become a requirement. Currently, the only IoT platform supported by SLE is the Raspberry Pi 3. However, there is no current supported migration from Leap 15 to SLE 15 with the Raspberry Pi. The barrier to entry in the IoT/embedded markets are lowered when a developer starts a project with Leap 15. Plus, the many supported arm boards can help developers circumnavigate future obstacles that might hinder project’s growth in a developing market.

(more…)

openSUSE Donates 10 More Raspberry Pis to GNU Health

May 26th, 2018 by

The openSUSE Project once again donated 10 Raspberry Pis to GNU Health Project, which were handed over to the project’s founder Luis Falcon at the openSUSE Conference today.

Last year, the openSUSE Project donated 10 Raspberry Pis to the non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO) that delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

The affordable ARM hardware that was donated last year were distributed to Italy, India, Cameroon, Germany, Spain and Argentina to improve healthcare management and patient care. Some were also used to improve development on the platform.

GNU Health’s free software provides functionality to facilitate a Hospital Information System (HIS),  Health Information System and Electronic Medical Record (EMR) management.

Both Falcon and Axel Braun gave talks at the openSUSE Conference about GNU Health and how it is changing digital ecosystem and benefiting communities on a global scale.

More talks about GNU Health and its Raspberry Pis are expected to be discussed at the GNU Health Conference in November, which openSUSE is sponsoring this year.

Users of openSUSE can install GNU Health as part of the official release of openSUSE Leap 15 at software.opensuse.org.

Based on Enterprise Code, Tested Millions of Times: openSUSE Leap 15 released

May 25th, 2018 by

EN, CA, CZ, DE, ES, JA, PL, PT-BR, ZH, ZH-TW

Fresh community build on top of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 brings huge variety of newest software, easy migration to SLE, transactional updates, server roles, scalable cloud images and Linux laptops

Today’s major release of openSUSE Leap 15 is offering professional users, entrepreneurs and ISVs (Independent Software Vendors) a new, fresh and hardened code base for their workloads that supports modern hardware, based on a stable, community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution – but developed with a modern, more secure, better tested and much more open open-source build system unique to SUSE and openSUSE.

New Features

openSUSE Leap 15 now allows migration to SLE, brings a new partitioner, integrates the Groupware Kopano, moves to Firewalld – and also comes distributed by Linode (for Cloud and infrastructure setups) and on high-end hardware like Tuxedo Laptops (other Cloud and hardware vendors will follow). On top of that, Leap 15 introduces a system role selection with classic “server” or “transactional server” role with transactional updates and a read-only root file system. This brings in all the benefits of atomic updates to the full scope of deployments, from the Internet of Things (IoT) and embedded devices to classical server and desktop roles. Apart from that, Leap 15 has been continually optimized for cloud usage scenarios as virtualization guest and at the same time offers a great variety of desktops, including KDE and GNOME and features the return of Live images for simple test-driving.

New Look, closely aligned with SLE

With a brand new look developed by the community, openSUSE Leap 15 brings plenty of community packages built on top of a core from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources, with the two major releases being built in parallel from the beginning for the first time. Leap 15 shares a common core with SLE 15, which is due for release in the coming months. The first release of Leap was version 42.1, and it was based on the first Service Pack (SP1) of SLE 12. Three years later SUSE’s enterprise version and openSUSE’s community version are now aligned at 15 with a fresh rebase.

“Having a community distribution that shares a common DNA with enterprise is the smart way to interact with the open-source ecosystem,” said Kai Dupke, long-time openSUSE user and senior product manager for SUSE Linux Enterprise 15. “Leap provides great flexibility and freedom of choice for developers and users.”

Migration to Enterprise made easy

Consequently, for the first time, SUSE will support migration from openSUSE Leap server installations to SUSE Linux Enterprise, which makes it easy for system integrators to develop on Leap code and later move to an enterprise version for SLAs, certification, mass deployment, or extended Long Term Support.

“Upgrading to a commercial product can be complex for developers wanting to migrate a solution from a community Linux distribution to an enterprise distribution”, Dupke explains. “With Leap 15 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15, that journey is made easy. We know that the community is where the innovations happen, and Leap community developers now can easily broaden that scope into enterprise Linux, if needed. Leap 15 is offering the quickest and most flexible transition to enterprise service, support and maintenance.”

OBS, OpenQA: Better Tested, More Secure and More Open than Others

(more…)

Have a Release Party, Promote openSUSE’s Newest Version

May 16th, 2018 by

There are just 9 days left for the release of openSUSE Leap 15 and the community can help spread the word of the release by having a release party and promoting the newest version of Leap.

Thanks to hellcp people can decorate their blogs and website with the openSUSE Leap 15 counter:

      

A list of social media posts are listed on the wiki and members of the community are encouraged to translate and post the translated posts in their local language on social media.

Many members of the community will be at the openSUSE Conference for the release/after party but the parties can continue with your own Release Party. If you don’t know how to do this, there is a list of five steps to have a successful release party. Plus more details are listed below on how to have a fantastic party.

Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires a bit of planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party. If you plan on having a party, email ddemaio (at) opensuse.org well before the party to get some goodies to hand out to the party people. Please include “Leap 15 Party” in the subject line and include a mailing address and phone number.

Notify the community of your release party by listing your party on the launch party wiki page.

checklist:

Find a date

The date of a party is best during a weekend (because it’s easier for people to join, since most people work during the week), but we all function differently. Find two alternative dates for the party if you want and use http://www.doodle.com/ to find a common date that works for most people.

Find a place

A cafe, bar or Linux group meetup location are all great places to have an event. A coffee and cake release party is just as fun as a beer and pizza release party.

Cake

It is not necessary to have a cake, but it sure is a lot of fun. You can also have openSUSE Cookies. On the Launch Party wiki page, there are two Release Parties list so far. One release party is in Nuremberg, Germany, on August 3 starting at 4 p.m. The other party is listed for FrOSCon and both will have a cake.

Pictures, pictures, pictures

Bring one or more cameras to take pictures or videos and post them to social media. Tag openSUSE on the photos you post on Twitter, Google +, Facebook or Diaspora.

Swag

PromoDVDs, webcam covers and stickers – If we can get it to you without too much red tape from governments, we will; just email ddemaio (at) opensuse.org with Release Party.

IMPORTANT TIP: Schedule your release party on the wiki and have a lot of fun!

Transactional Updates in openSUSE Leap 15

May 15th, 2018 by

This blog is part of a series of technical blogs leading up to the release of openSUSE Leap 15. All of the blogs provide a use case regarding openSUSE Leap and the packages available in the distribution. Happy reading.

Transactional Updates is one of the exciting new features available in the upcoming release of openSUSE Leap 15, which is scheduled to be officially released May 25.

Contributed by the Kubic Project, Transactional Updates provides openSUSE systems with a method of updating the operating system and its packages in an entirely ‘atomic’ way. Updates are either applied to the system all together in a single transaction, or not at all. This happens without influencing the running system. If an update fails, or if the successful update is deemed to be incompatible or otherwise incorrect, it can be discarded to immediately return the system to its previous functioning state.

This differs from existing alternatives that already exist in the open source world. Some users use a rather exorbitant approach of maintaining multiple versions of their system in multiple partitions on disk to switch between the partitions to address a fear of tampering with a perfectly running system.

This juggling approach works, but takes an exorbitant amount of disk storage and maintenance efforts. More modern approaches like using ostree and snap attempt to address these problems and bring atomic/transactional updates to their users. However, these solutions have unintended consequence as users, developers, and partnering software vendors all learn new ways of managing their systems and existing packages cannot be re-used, which require either repackging or conversion. All of this develops to a situation where adopters need to redesign their mindsets, systems, tools and company policies to work with these clever tools. These workarounds have some key flaws that Kubic’s Transactional Updates feature strives to avoid.

Under the hood, Transactional Updates are made simple. Utilising the same btrfs, snapper, and zypper technologies that are trusted defaults in openSUSE Leap, Transactional Updates do something very similar to the traditional snapshots and rollbacks in Leap. However, Transactional Updates it never touches the running system. Instead of patching the current system, the transactional-update tool creates a new snapshot. All of the operations required by the update are carried out into a snapshot that ensures the current system is untouched with no changes impacting the running system.

(more…)

Status update for openSUSE Conference

May 14th, 2018 by

The openSUSE Conference is right around the corner and attendees list keeps growing for oSC18, which will take place May 25 – 27 at the Faculty of Information Technologies of Czech Technical University in Prague.

There are about 250 people signed up to attend the conference and most of the talks have been scheduled for this year’s conference. In addition to the conference, there will be a cryptofest on May 26, which will incorporate comes oSC18. The schedule for the cryptofest list three oSC18 security-focused talks and will be room 107.

There are several track that will be taking place at the conference like an openSUSE track, a cloud and  containers track, an open source track, a desktop and application track and an embedded track. On Saturday, May 26, will be a lightingbeers talk where people will get a free beer and give a short 5 minutes talks; people can sign up for this at http://bit.ly/2wtjczw.

There will be a wide range of speakers from many different open-source projects, and on Sunday, May 27, there will be an unconference in room 107; people can submitted their ideas for talks at the unconference on the Friday and Saturday. A schedule for the unconference will be made available for the last day.

On the first day of the conference, there will be the release of openSUSE Leap 15 at 14:00 local time or 12:00 UTC. Later that evening, there will be the conference after party, release party at the venue.

Attendees can subscribe to the Telegram channel for the conference at https://t.me/oSC18 to stay in touch with attendees at the conference and to receive updates.

(more…)