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GNU Compiler Collection 7 Now openSUSE Tumbleweed Default

June 1st, 2017 by

The default compiler for openSUSE Tumbleweed became GNU Compiler Collection 7 after the release of snapshot 20170529 making openSUSE the first major distribution to have the new compiler by default.

While Tumbleweed still has GCC6, GCC7 is now the standard for completing executable binaries for the chameleon’s rolling distribution and the change momentarily slowed down the rapid release cycle of Tumbleweed.

“A major update like GCC always take a lot of preparation time and, as it shows in this case, even then some things can slip through,” wrote Dominique Leuenberger is an email to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List, which people who use openSUSE Tumbleweed should subscribe. Luckily, no damage was done to any system in the wild yet.”

The snapshot did expose a graphical glitch with Mozilla Thunderbird has since been fixed.

GCC 7 contains a number of enhancements that help detect buffer overflow and other forms of invalid memory accesses, according to its change log. Position Independent Executables was also enabled by default together with the switch to GCC7.

Snapshot 20170529 also brought a major version change to mono-core (version 5.0), which is an open source, cross platform .NET framework based on the ECMA standards for C# and the Common Language Runtime. Another major version change was made to xfce4-panel-plugin-mount, which updated from version 0.6.4 to version 1.1.2; the newer version offers various bugfixes, feature enhancements and port to GTK3. Two other major version changes also came in the snapshot with icu 59.1 and the advanced power management tool tlp 1.0.

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Introducing Kubic Project: a new open-source project

May 29th, 2017 by

Recent years have seen tremendous growth in the container technologies market. From being a non-existent category just a few years ago to being one of the most interesting, fast development and exciting areas.

Containers change the way we think about application architecture and the speed at which we can deliver on business requirements. They provide consistency and portability across environments and allow developers to focus on building a great product, without the distraction of underlying execution details.

Today the entire application delivery supply chain is changing as the age of abstract application creation is upon us. This change is fueled by the adoption of a few key technologies,  including shared code repositories, continuous integration, continuous development, and cloud computing.  However, the ultimate driver of this movement is a software delivery mechanism: containers.

Project Kubic is a generic project for the many new initiatives related to re-designing the operating system around principles of immutable infrastructure and the usage of a stack based on Linux, docker project and Kubernetes.  The primary building block of the Kubic Project is the Container Host OS based on openSUSE Tumbleweed.

In the near future and with your support, we’ll be enabling Kubernetes and many other new features. This will allow you to easily build Container as a Service (CaaS) solutions and run them everywhere…

How can the Kubic Project help me?

  •  Traditional OS are cool and fun to hack on, but the model with a single runtime environment controlled by the OS and shared by all applications does not meet the requirements of modern application-centric IT.
  • Based on a monolithic approach, the traditional OS brings lots of challenges for managing the stacks running on top of it. With Kubic, we would like to rethink the OS by redesigning it for modern IT applications.
  • In agile environments, developers and DevOps engineers are taking responsibilities over their app and seeking control over the runtime underneath their applications, without necessarily owning the entire stack.
  • VMs provide a means for separation among applications, but this model adds resource and management overhead.

Join our Kubic Project and together we will build the next generation of Container OS

Useful information:

(This blog is written by Simona Arsene and was originally published at https://www.suse.com/communities/blog/introducing-kubic-project-new-open-source-project/)

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Kernel 4.11 Arrives in openSUSE Tumbleweed

May 18th, 2017 by

Multiple small pattern changes had momentarily slowed the releases of openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots, but snapshots are expected to come more frequently moving forward.

The newest snapshot, 20170516, brought Linux Kernel 4.11 and tons of new fixes and features. The new kernel has at least eight prominent features and a pluggable IO scheduler for the multiqueue block layer is just one of the many features. There are some fixes for nvidia drivers in the 4.11.1 Kernel, which expected to arrive in the next Tumbleweed snapshot if all goes according to plan.

The snapshot also delivered an update for python-requests with version 2.13.0, which has multiple fixes including fixing an issue with JSON encoding detection. Python-sip 4.19.2 provided a fix for a crash and power-device supporter nut 2.7.4 changed some command and variable naming schemes as well as added a new class of device support for Automatic Transfer Switch.

KDE Applications 17.04.0 made it’s way into the 20170516 and 20170510 snapshots. Among the many improvements are 3D rendering with KAlgebra, more stability for the video editor Kdenlive and a new version of Minuet, which will helps teach and learn music, offers more exercises and ear-learning tasks. (more…)

GNOME 3.24.1, Plasma 5.9.5 Arrive in Tumbleweed

May 5th, 2017 by

A total of seven openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released since last week’s update, which brought several minor version updates and less than a handful of major version updates.

A change on the server that prepares the .diff emails that are generated caused a hiccup for the Tumbleweed announcer, so snapshots 20170428, 20170429, 20170430 and 20170502 were all listed in snapshots 20170503. The change to the server was to create a similar data comparison file to generate emails for Leap 42.3, so it could list packages that are changed during its rolling development process.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages

April 27th, 2017 by

openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts.

Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.

Besides the google-croscore-fonts in snapshots 20170424, users can get a fix for the CD/DVD burning software Brasero, which provided a patch for Grub2 that fixes builds with the GNU Composite Compilers, and kdebase4-workspace offers a diff to fix an error reported by GCC7, which should be helpful as Tumbleweed works closer to adapt the newest GCC. The snapshot also delivered a patch for VirtualBox that will provide an eventual Application Programming Interface change for the release of Leap 42.3. (more…)

Samba, Ceph, LightDM Update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

April 20th, 2017 by

Snapshots released the past two weeks of openSUSE Tumbleweed have slowed down a bit, but new software continues to be updated in the five snapshots that have been release since April 6.

The most recent snapshot, 20170417, brought Samba 4.6.2, which had an enormous amount of bug fixes and addressed regression issues introduced by the security fixes for CVE-2017-2619. gPhoto had lots of improvements thanks to the update to libgphoto2 2.5.13. The snapshot also updated ethtool to version 4.10, which synchronized the utility used for displaying and modifying some parameters of network interface controllers with the upstream release, and yast2-fonts’ 3.2.0 version fixed regression introduced in version 3.1.17 and added UTF-8 encoding to Ruby strings.

Snapshot 20170414  provided the 3.5.25 version of squid in the repositories, which fixed aspects involved with data connections and FTP traffic intercepts, and yast2-dhcp-server’s 3.2.2 version fixed a crash happens with the latest yast2-core and yast2-ruby-bindings packages. The premier library for Internationalization Components for Unicode (ICU), which provides globalized support for software applications, was updated to version  58.2 and fixed some issues for Cantonese, Greek and Arabic users as well as updated Emoji characters and 19 new symbols for the new 4K TV standard.

Mozilla Firefox fixed a startup crash on Linux with it’s 52.0.2 release in Tumbleweed’s 20170413 snapshot and the Linux Kernel was updated to version 4.10.9. Linux Kernel initiator open-iscsi had a large amount of patch removals and additions. The btrfs file system matured even more with the release of version 4.10.2. The suite and art application Calligra received a fix for crash when using arrow keys in version 3.0.1 and it’s Flow chart added undo commands. The snapshot also merged upstream Ceph fixes for the codestream. WindowMaker 0.95.8 added some patches and new features for veteran users. (more…)

Bird Watching: An openSUSE Maker Project

April 18th, 2017 by

Creating cool projects is what makes openSUSE so much fun and a recent project by an openSUSE member highlights just how creative and fun one can be using openSUSE.

Adrian Schröter took a Raspberry Pi 3 using openSUSE to create a 3D-printed foldable tripod and took the idea even further by using the Raspberry Pi 3 used to build the tripod to take interval photographs of a Storch and it’s nest with a Sony A5100 camera.

The nest appeared in 2016 and Schröter has been taking pictures of the Storch and it’s nest for a few months.

To print the foldable tripod, Schröter made the design using FreeCAD, which is a general purpose 3D Computer-Aided Design program that he packages for openSUSE’s distributions. Sony A5100 support for Gphoto from another community member, Marcus Meissner, helped to get the camera functioning to take photos roughly every 30 seconds.

Schröter has a blog about that updates pictures about the Storch and it’s nest at http://www.storch-bleckmar.de. The blog is in German, so brush up on your Deutsch or just enjoy the photos.

Newest GNOME, KDE, Kernel Arrive in Tumbleweed

April 6th, 2017 by

Eighteen openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots brought several new packages to users last month, which included both  GNOME 3.24 and KDE Plasma 5.9.4.

GNOME 3.24 received most of the hype in snapshot 20170322, but that release also included Mozilla Firefox’s newest 52.0.1 version, which added support for WebAssembly, an emerging standard that brings near-native performance to Web-based games, apps, and software libraries without the use of plugins.

Closing out the month, snapshot 20170331 brought git 2.12.2 that provided a Command Line Interface output fix and python 3.6.1, which provided some bug fixes and updates to documentation. Ruby 2.2 switched to git-branch based patching and patched an exploitable heap overflow vulnerability for CVE-2016-2339. (more…)

GNU Health, openSUSE Pioneer Shift in Healthcare Management

March 13th, 2017 by

The GNU Health Project is one of many noble open-source projects and the openSUSE Project is pleased to announce it has donated 10 Raspberry Pis to help expand the use and development of the project on affordable ARM hardware.

GNU Health, which is a non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO), delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

“Running GNU Health  on an inexpensive computer like a Raspberry Pi really brings GNU Health’s vision of freedom and equity in health care closer to reality,” said Richard Brown, chairman of the openSUSE Project. “Think of the possibilities devices like these have to improve healthcare management and patient care using GNU Health.”

Raspberry Pis are full-blown computers with a huge potential for GNU Health and the industry, said Luis Falcón, founder of the GNU Health Project. For example, they can be used in real-time monitoring of vital signs in hospital settings and retrieving information from laboratory instruments for Personal Health Records at research and academic institutions.

“The fact that they come with openSUSE and GNUHealth pre-installed on Raspberry Pi, allows for fast deployment in many different contexts,” Falcón said, referring to the Raspberry Pi being put to field use.

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Systemd Gets Important Commit in Tumbleweed

March 9th, 2017 by

A total of five snapshots this week brought openSUSE Tumbleweed users and developers several new packages and an important systemd commit.

Topping this week’s updates were Wireshark, Wayland and KDE Frameworks  5.31.0.

Snapshot 201700308 brought an import commit for systemd that makes sure to destroy all name watching bus slots when kicked off the bus, according to the change log. The snapshot also produced an update to e2fsprogs 1.43.4, which provided a fix for e2fsck’s handling of system.data extended attributes for small files and file 5.30 added some upstream patches.

The 201700305 snapshot produced several packages including diffutils 3.5.15, tcpdump 4.9.0, libX11 1.6.5 and google-noto-fonts 20161025. Grep had a major version update to 3.0 and uses fdupes to replace duplicate files with symlinks. The bluetooth protocol stack BlueZ was updated in the snapshot for version 5.44. (more…)