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MJ Technology Tablet has openSUSE, Dual Boot

November 22nd, 2016 by

It’s official; the Warrior Tablet made by MJ Technology and powered by openSUSE is ready for the world; now it just needs funding through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

Avid Linux users can reap the benefits of four 10.1” Linux tablets offered by MJ Techology. The specifications of the four tablets vary in power and cost, but all come with the power of Linux and openSUSE at the core.

“MJ Technology, a leader in affordable cutting edge tech, is pleased to introduce the MJ Technology Warrior series tablets powered by openSUSE,” said Mark Jun, CEO for MJ Technology.

The preinstalled image on the Warrior Tablet Series is GNOME on openSUSE Leap, but users are welcome to change/reinstall/use Tumbleweed/etc. Any hardware support will be upstream via the Open Build Service and will not impede different usage patterns, so there is no lock-in, which gives the user choice.

The tablets offer dual boot for Windows 10 or use openSUSE Leap as a sole operating system for personal use. System administrators needing to manage multiple servers remotely can fulfill needs with the World’s First actual Made-for-Linux x86/x64 Tablet.

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Tumbleweed gets three snapshots, Leap deadline approaches

August 10th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenSince the release of Linux Kernel 4.7 in the 20160730 snapshot, which brought lengthy email discussions about out-of-tree and third-party drivers on the Factory mailing list, openSUSE Tumbleweed produced three snapshots.

Snapshot 20160803 made a small update to the repositories for Mozilla Thunderbird and k3b. The snapshot updated libzypp to version 16.2.1, gnome-online-accounts to 3.20.3 and obs-service-source_validator. In 20160803, virt-viewer had the most changes.

Snapshot 20160805 brought more package changes and one major uninstall. LXDM was dropped from openSUSE Tumbleweed and uninstalled in this snapshot. LightDM is being used in the environment instead and is auto-installed with a change configuration for those who are using LXDM. This snapshot provided several repository updates, and NetworkManager-gnome, Libreoffice 5.2.0.4 and WireShark 2.0.5 were a few of the many changes found is 20160805.

The most recent snapshot, 20160806, updated Inkscape, which provides more extensions. Wayland-protocols updated to a new upstream release of 1.5 and btrfsprogs has new options to run in the background with version 4.7.

Tumbleweed users will likely get Plasma 5.72 in the next snapshot, which should be released soon.

openSUSE Leap

In two weeks is the submission deadline to get packages in the next version of openSUSE Leap 42.2. The Beta 1 is scheduled for release at the end of this month, according to the roadmap.

The current development version, Alpha 3, needs more people to test the version and file bugs. Download Alpha 3 and test it out at software.opensuse.org.

Introducing: openSUSE heroes

July 25th, 2016 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoDuring the last weeks, the openSUSE board and others expressed their concern about the current state of some openSUSE infrastructure: especially the reaction times to change something in the setup were mentioned multiple times. Looks like we lost some administrators and/or contact points at SUSE who helped out in the past to eliminate problems or work together with the community.

As result, there was a meeting held during the openSUSE Conference 2016, including some SUSE employees and openSUSE community members to discuss the current situation and search for some possible solutions. The discussion was very fruitful and we’d like to share some of the results here to inform everyone and actively ask for help. If you want to join us, the openSUSE heroes, do not hesitate to contact us and join an incredible team!

If you first want to know more about the status, read on what the openSUSE Heroes discussed in their first meeting on 2016-06-26 (Participants: cboltz, orangecms, adalovelace, ganglia, wnereiz, mcaj, lrupp):

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New workers get Tumbleweed rolling

February 25th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-black-greenopenQA workers that keep Tumbleweed tested and rolling have almost been replenished.

The new hardware can run more workers and is newer, bigger and faster, which increases the speed of openQA testing. One of two Intel E5-2630 v3 is partially running while the other has yet to be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure. Each machine has 8 cores with 16 threads for a total of 16 cores of 32 threads when both machines become fully functional. The new hardware has each have 256GB of RAM and 400GB Intel NVMe SSDs.

SUSE’s infrastructure team was really helpful in getting the new machine working with openSUSE infrastructure and deserve a lot of credit for their efforts. Thank you SUSE.

The latest, full-testing went through in six hours as opposed to the normal 14 hour duration. That, plus the additional workers currently running greatly increase openQA’s speed.

Since the last update, which informed readers about openQA workers (hardware) that went down, openSUSE Tumbleweed has released three snapshots.

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OBS welcomes new lambkins

January 27th, 2016 by

The openSUSE build service becomes more and more a victim of his success: building constantly more than 300,000 packages for more than 43,000 developers needs really a lot of build power! And build power means not only CPU! It includes everything that you can expect from an IT infrastructure:

Old hard-drives from OBS-workers

Old hard-drives from OBS-workers

  • CPU power
  • RAM (the more, the better)
  • Storage (temporary local, on the clients and also to store and distribute the results)
  • Network
  • electic power (and cooling, and maintenance, and manpower to maintain the hardware, …)

Thankfully our main sponsor SUSE allowed us now to buy some new hardware to replace some of the old machines that build software packages for over ten different distributions all day long.

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Sometimes you need some luck (was: build.opensuse.org downtime)

April 24th, 2014 by

A morning you love as admin: starting with one single disk in your storage array failing, ending up in a whole array crashing. (more…)

Bodega, app stores and the Open Build Service

April 3rd, 2014 by

Welcome to the Bodega store!

Bodega is a project making use of the Open Build Service. Aside from that, there are many other connections between the Bodega team and openSUSE – time to find out more! We spoke with Aaron Seigo, and discussed Bodega, Appstream, zypper, ymp and the beauty of Free Software.

What is Bodega?

First off, let’s find out what Bodega is all about. Aaron explains:

Bodega is a store for digital stuff. In fancy words: it creates a catalog of metadata which represents digital assets.

The most important thing is of course the ‘digital asset’ term. That can be anything. For example, applications. Applications can be self contained – think how android does its APK files. Of course, things on Linux are often more complicated. Apache isn’t exactly a self-contained thing. And look further – perl, php, ruby, they all have their own addons like gems that need managing. Generalizing further, there are manuals. And books in general. Music, movies, pictures, you can go on.


Setting up a Bodega account

Of course, the competition has these too – look at Apple or Google.

And how about Linux…

Linux does not have a store where you can get such a wide variety of things. For a game, you can use Appstream, get it from Apper or GNOME’s software center. They all give a view on applications. Unfortunately, that is only useful for desktops and can handle things barely above the level of Angry Birds. If you want a python module as developers – these fancy tools won’t help you. Nor are they useful on servers. For those you have to rely on command line tools or even do things completely by hand. And it is all different between distributions.

Going further, where do you get documentation? For openSUSE, that’s activedoc or the forums or our support database on the wiki. Not from zypper. Music – you can get that from Magnatune and so on.

What if you can have one place where you can get a book, game, applications, isn’t that nice? That is what Bodega is.


The main screen of the store

How is Bodega different?

So, Bodega offers a digital store which can handle a wider variety of things than our current solutions. But what sets it apart from proprietary technologies like the Playstore and of course Canonical’s store solution? Aaron:

Most Linux solutions like Appstream assume their audience are users who play Angry Birds and use spreadsheets. Fair enough. Bodega takes a different approach and is far more ambitious.

Bodega has all the meta data in one place and offers ‘stores’ which are views on that data. That means you can have a software developer store, for example listing all languages and their addons separate; and a server section etc. And a separate UI for the angry-bird-and-spreadsheet crowd. All from the same bodega system, filtered by tags (not static categories!).

Talking about Appstream, Bodega can of course benefit from the metadata gathered for Appstream. And GNOME’s Software Center could be reworked to be a front-end to Bodega, adding books, music and lots of other digital data to its store. This is not meant to be a rewrite of what is there, or an isolated effort!


An application in the store

And why would you build on Bodega?

Bodega is open: everybody can quite easily add their own stores; or their own data sources; and add content and even sell it through their channels. It is not a closed system, on the contrary.

Open is a must, especially for Linux:

Take the 440.000 users of openSUSE. That would be a minimal amount of sales… The top-10 of paid apps in ubuntu makes less than a $100 per month of sales. Not really worth the effort. But if we could aggregate the sales between distributions, it would become relevant for third-party developers. Bodega as a cross-distribution is important!

And Bodega is useful for people outside of Linux. You can have your store on your own website so it is realistically possible for a independent author to sell their books in a bodega instance on their own website and never even SEE Linux. Yet the openSUSE users can get the books and benefit from the larger ecosystem…

The beauty of it is that it is all Free and Open Source Software, front and back. You can self-host all you want.

How do Bodega and OBS relate?


Preview of a wallpaper

Bodega and openSUSE have something in common: the Open Build Service. Not only is OBS used by the Bodega developers and do they run openSUSE on their servers, Bodega supports ymp files!

Bodega is well integrated with the Open Build Service. If you create an app from OBS in Bodega, you just have to take the yaml file and fill in the missing details, adding screen shots for example. Bodega will not pull the package from OBS and store it somewhere. Instead it simply uses the one-click-install and when a user clicks on the install button, it sends the one-click-install file through. It thus does not interfere with updates, but it can show users that a new version is available and let them update from Bodega if they want.

Packagers still have to add their apps to the store but we could kickstart Bodega with the apps already shipped in openSUSE, using the Appstream metadata. Non-official repos can then be added and so on. It would be quite easy to import all of the openSUSE packages. Same with the and documentation and drivers (it can show “developer: nvidia” so users know to trust it). And if there is a new revision of the documentation, Bodega can take care of that, just like it handles software updates (through zypper of course).

This is where you can come in: the team is looking for help in this area and if you are interested in making this happen, come talk to the Bodega folks! You can find them on the active mailing list or the #plasma active channel on Freenode.

Done


Famous books included!

You might be eager to find out what is there, today. Well, if you’ve seen the screenshots to the side, you know there is an app to access the store. It is build for touch screens but works just fine and you can get it in openSUSE through software.opensuse.org. Once installed, you can fire it up typing “active-addons” in a run command dialog.

Shawn Dunn (of cloverleaf fame) is putting together a more traditional desktop UI, while maintaining these packages as well. You will be able to have a conversation with him as he’s going to be at the openSUSE Conference in Dubrovnik this month where he will present a session about Bodega! He is known as SFaulken online and pretty much always hangs in the #opensuse-kde channel on Freenode where you can ask how to get things running or how to help him break stuff anytime. He’s also yelling at the world on google plus.

Bodega now contains the entire book set of Project Gutenberg (thousands of awesome, free books) as well as a number of wallpapers and applications. Aaron:

There is work to be done to include all openSUSE Software in Bodega. The store can use a little work too, but is based on QML which makes it very easy to improve. If you’re interested in helping out, let us know!

You can contact Aaron on IRC as aseigo in the #plasma active channel on Freenode, ping him on Google+ or shoot him a mail on aseigo on the KDE.org servers.

SUSE Speeds up Building AArch64 Software in QEMU

October 1st, 2013 by

ARM AArch64 logo
Following the announcement of much improved Raspberry Pi support, there is more news coming from the openSUSE ARM team! The SUSE team has been developing an AArch64 port of QEMU which is much faster building 64 bit ARM code in emulation and this code is aimed for upstream inclusion. Read on to find out what this is all about. (more…)

Help Wanted: openSUSE Review Team

August 28th, 2013 by

Package review image

The openSUSE Review Team is interested in adding 1 to 2 new members to the team.  This person will review submissions to opnSUSE Factory that will improve the quality of the product and add great new functionality to the already awesome openSUSE distribution.  Details of the tasks performed by the members of the Review Team can be seen on the openSUSE Review Team wiki page and the associated openSUSE Factory Submissions portal.

Ideally we want to add a non-SUSE employee from the community, but all qualified candidates will be considered.  (Dominique “Dimstar” Leuenberger would really appreciate some more non-SUSE folks on the team.  Who can blame him?!)

A qualified candidate would display the following characteristics:

a) works well with the Review Team and the openSUSE (and greater Linux) community
b) considerable expertise with RPM packaging
c) considerable expertise with openSUSE packaging methods and standards
d) reasonable awareness of Linux security concerns
e) an appreciation for quality controls and the value of solid, quality software
f) an availability to routinely perform these tasks for the community.  Typically a few hours per week divided over several days during the week.
g) willing to apply the rules to everybody; primary goal is to safeguard quality, not friendship :)    You’re even allowed to decline coolo’s request!

Applications will be considered until 9 September 2013.

If you’re interested, please send email to the Review Team via review@opensuse.org.  In your email, tell a little about yourself, particularly about the “a” through “g” qualifications listed above.

Oh, and don’t forget to have fun.

Server outages the coming days

May 18th, 2013 by

Failed geekoBelieve it or not: a car crashed into the Nuremberg SUSE office building. Our geekos are fine but the power will have to be shut down so repairs can take place. You can expect some availability issues for our servers the coming days. Hopefully things will be back up next week!