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openSUSE to have Summit in Dublin

October 16th, 2019 by

The openSUSE Community is going to Ireland March 27 and 28, 2020, for openSUSE Summit Dublin.

Registration for the summit has begun and the Call for Papers is open until Feb. 14.

The summit will begin at the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encouraged to register for the summit and submit a talk.

The schedule for the openSUSE Summit Dublin will be posted on Feb. 17.

There is an openSUSE and open source track. There are three talks that can be submitted for the summit. One is a short talk with a 15-minute limit;a normal talk with a with a 30-minute limit and a long talk with a 45-minute limit.

Attendees of SUSECON are welcome to attend and submit talks. openSUSE Summit Dublin is a free community event that will take place on the last day of SUSECON and the Saturday that follows SUSECON.

Contact ddemaio (@) opensuse.org if you have any questions concerning the summit.

Kata Containers Packages are Available officially in openSUSE Tumbleweed

August 17th, 2019 by

Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem.

We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository.

It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic.

What is Kata

As already mentioned, Kata is a container runtime focusing on security and on ease of integration with the existing containers ecosystem. If you are wondering what’s a container runtime, this blog post by Sascha will give you a clear introduction about the topic.

Kata should be used when running container images whose source is not fully trusted, or when allowing other users to run their own containers on your platform.

Traditionally, containers share the same physical and operating system (OS) resources with host processes, and specific kernel features such as namespaces are used to provide an isolation layer between host and container processes. By contrast, Kata containers run inside lightweight virtual machines, adding an extra isolation and security layer, that minimizes the host attack surface and mitigates the consequences of containers breakout. Despite this extra layer, Kata achieves impressive runtime performances thanks to KVM hardware virtualization, and when configured to use a minimalist virtual machine manager (VMM) like Firecracker, a high density of microVM can be packed on a single host.

If you want to know more about Kata features and performances:

  • katacontainers.io is a great starting point.
  • For something more SUSE oriented, Flavio gave a interesting talk about Kata at SUSECON 2019,
  • Kata folks hang out on katacontainers.slack.com, and will be happy to answer any quesitons.

Why is it important for Kubic and openSUSE

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First Phase for openSUSE Conference Talks Begins

February 13th, 2019 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce the first phase for accepting talks for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19) has begun.

A total of 80 talks were submitted during the call for papers, which began in late fall and ended Feb. 4. In total, there were 42 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 19 short talks and seven lighting talks submitted.

The review team rated all the submitted abstracts and selected 22 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 13 short talks and five lighting talks.

Speakers have been notified of their accepted talk and must confirm their talk by March 1. If a speaker doesn’t confirm their talk by March 1, the talk will be withdrawn and the next highest rated talks will be accepted to fill the slot as part of the second phase of the talk selections for oSC19. Phase 2 will run from March 2 to March 16. The schedule for the conference will be published shortly after Phase 2.

There are five tracks listed for the conference this year. The tracks are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

The openSUSE Conference will take place at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19 or email ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

November 8th, 2018 by

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the  openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

Sebastian Riedel and Stephan Kulow have been developing the project for two years and it has been used in production for more than a year and half. The Cavil legal review system replaces an older system and provides much more efficiency. Cavil can automatically accept more than 90 percent of all new requests based on data from previous reviews, so packages are much more streamlined into openSUSE Factory.

The project has been so efficient that two lawyers who do all the legal reviews with the system, which is also used by SUSE, had reviewed about 110,000 packages this past year. The same lawyers curated a library with 27.000 license patterns for 600 licenses and 20 license patterns for 100 of the  most common licenses that are used to create legal reports. Riedel said there is a desire hope to expand that in the future with the hope of collecting new patterns with the open-source community.

The legal Data Base used by SUSE to generate reports with new license patterns  is about 2TB and has about 68.433.436 pattern matches in 27.319.682 individual files.

Like openQA, Cavil is written in Perl, with Mojolicious/Minion and PostgreSQL.

A quick look at the statistics about the content of the legal database showed the most popular open source licenses were GPL-2.0, BSD-3-Clause, GPL-Unspecified and MIT respectively.

openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

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openSUSE Heroes ♥ Let’s Encrypt™ – Expect certificate exchange

April 19th, 2018 by

openSUSE loves Let's Encrypt™

Maybe some of you noticed, that our certificate *.opensuse.org on many of services will expire soon (on 2018-04-23).

As we noticed that – as well – we decided to put a bit of work into this topic and we will use Let’s Encrypt certificates for the encrypted services of the openSUSE community.

This is just a short notice / announcement for all of you, that we are working on this topic at the moment. We will announce, together with the deployment of the new certificate, the regarding hashes and maybe some further information on our way of implementing things.

Just to give you a small number of services which will be affected, maybe you use one of the following list:

(This is a mixed list of services maintained by openSUSE Heroes and/or several SUSE teams for the openSUSE community – the certificate exchange will affect those services.)

  • build.opensuse.org
  • api.opensuse.org
  • openqa.opensuse.org
  • static.opensuse.org
  • ci.opensuse.org
  • svn.opensuse.org
  • software.opensuse.org
  • $LANG.opensuse.org for the several wiki instances
  • download.opensuse.org
  • keyserver.opensuse.org
  • …and many, many more :) – thanks to everybody in the openSUSE Heroes team for maintaining the zoo of services ;)

Thanks to the FLOSS & openSUSE community, we have full support of Let’s Encrypt certificates already on board our distribution.

As there are so many options to choose, we decided for the following tool to use Let’s Encrypt certificates:

  • dehydrated – as client with ACME v2 support – https://software.opensuse.org/package/dehydrated
    • with custom hook scripts, that will provide the wildcard-certificates to our proxy-infrastructure

Thanks to everybody involved in this task for getting the migration done.

Fun fact, as you might have noticed before, news.opensuse.org is not part of the openSUSE Heroes infrastructure (yet) and already got a new certificate from DigiCert.

Project Selected as Mentoring Organization for Google Summer of Code

February 14th, 2018 by


Let the fun begin! This week it was announced that the
openSUSE Project is one of the 212 mentoring organization for this year’s Google Summer of Code, which is an annual international program that awards stipends to university students to write code and learn about open source development during their summer break.

The openSUSE Project has participated in GSoC since 2006 and has helped more than 50 students get started with free software development.

As a mentoring organization, eligible students will have an opportunity between March 12 – 27 to submit a project proposal to the GSoC program site. The program is open to university students aged 18 or over.

The openSUSE website dedicated to GSoC offers nine projects that GSoC students can select from to use for their proposals. The topics focus on web development, quality assurance, packaging and user experience design. The technologies used in the project are Ruby on Rails, Perl, Ruby, Html/JavaScript and C/C++. (more…)

cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards

January 18th, 2018 by

The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs.

The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

“On behalf of the openSUSE Project and the many developers and packagers who use OBS to develop open-source software, we thank cPanel for their generosity,” said Richard Brown, openSUSE Chairman. “This contribution not only helps the openSUSE project but will help other open-source projects as well.”

OBS is a generic system to build and distribute binary packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way. It can release packages as well as updates, add-ons, appliances and entire distributions for a wide range of operating systems and hardware architectures.

“We use an internal installation of the Open Build Service, and also help customers and third parties use the public OBS at build.opensuse.org,” said Ken Power, Vice President of Product Development at cPanel. “Supporting the open source projects that we use is incredibly important to us, and we’re glad to be able to help here.”

The network cards will be used to improve the backend of OBS.

“The cards will be used to connect the OBS backend storage and network; bringing it from a 1GB to 10BG and improving the backend performance,” said Thorsent Bro, a member of the openSUSE Heroes team. “We want to thank cPanel for its generous support and giving back to the projects that help with Linux/GNU development.”

SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

October 4th, 2017 by

Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service

Written by Andreas Jaeger

SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

As you may be aware, we have an Open Build Service (OBS) tool that helps you to build packages to deliver complete distributions. In the last few years, we have been updating this tool and it now can handle any kind of image.

Additionally, the default engine for building images at SUSE is kiwi and is used in both SUSE Studio and OBS.

Reviewing these offerings and the way the image build situation has evolved, we have decided to merge the two online services, OBS and SUSE Studio, into a common solution.

Looking at the feature requests for SUSE Studio on image building and looking at our technologies, we decided to use OBS as the base for our image building service. Since OBS already builds images for various environments, we will first add a new image building GUI to OBS. This combined solution will now be delivered as “SUSE Studio Express”.

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OBS got the power!

February 25th, 2017 by

Old build workers, rack mounted

One year after introducing a new kind of Open Build Service worker machines, the “lambkins”, the openSUSE Build Service got a big hardware refresh. The new machines, sponsored by SUSE, are equipped with:

– 2,8GHz AMD Opteron Processors (6348)

– 256 GB RAM

– one 120 GB SSD

Four of them are located in a chassis with a height of 2 units and run 12-16 workers on them (virtual machines, that are building packages).

That new build power allowed us to remove some of old machines from the pool. The unified hardware makes the management of the machines a lot easier now, even if there are still the most powerful old machines left.

For those who like some more pictures, feel free to check the rest of the entry… (more…)