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Project Selected as Mentoring Organization for Google Summer of Code

February 14th, 2018 by


Let the fun begin! This week it was announced that the
openSUSE Project is one of the 212 mentoring organization for this year’s Google Summer of Code, which is an annual international program that awards stipends to university students to write code and learn about open source development during their summer break.

The openSUSE Project has participated in GSoC since 2006 and has helped more than 50 students get started with free software development.

As a mentoring organization, eligible students will have an opportunity between March 12 – 27 to submit a project proposal to the GSoC program site. The program is open to university students aged 18 or over.

The openSUSE website dedicated to GSoC offers nine projects that GSoC students can select from to use for their proposals. The topics focus on web development, quality assurance, packaging and user experience design. The technologies used in the project are Ruby on Rails, Perl, Ruby, Html/JavaScript and C/C++. (more…)

cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards

January 18th, 2018 by

The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs.

The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

“On behalf of the openSUSE Project and the many developers and packagers who use OBS to develop open-source software, we thank cPanel for their generosity,” said Richard Brown, openSUSE Chairman. “This contribution not only helps the openSUSE project but will help other open-source projects as well.”

OBS is a generic system to build and distribute binary packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way. It can release packages as well as updates, add-ons, appliances and entire distributions for a wide range of operating systems and hardware architectures.

“We use an internal installation of the Open Build Service, and also help customers and third parties use the public OBS at build.opensuse.org,” said Ken Power, Vice President of Product Development at cPanel. “Supporting the open source projects that we use is incredibly important to us, and we’re glad to be able to help here.”

The network cards will be used to improve the backend of OBS.

“The cards will be used to connect the OBS backend storage and network; bringing it from a 1GB to 10BG and improving the backend performance,” said Thorsent Bro, a member of the openSUSE Heroes team. “We want to thank cPanel for its generous support and giving back to the projects that help with Linux/GNU development.”

SUSE Studio online + Open Build Service = SUSE Studio Express

October 4th, 2017 by

Merging SUSE Studio and Open Build Service

Written by Andreas Jaeger

SUSE Studio was launched in 2009 to make building images really easy. Nowadays, images are used everywhere – for public cloud you need images; container images are used to have small and movable workloads, and data center operators use golden images to start their workloads.

As you may be aware, we have an Open Build Service (OBS) tool that helps you to build packages to deliver complete distributions. In the last few years, we have been updating this tool and it now can handle any kind of image.

Additionally, the default engine for building images at SUSE is kiwi and is used in both SUSE Studio and OBS.

Reviewing these offerings and the way the image build situation has evolved, we have decided to merge the two online services, OBS and SUSE Studio, into a common solution.

Looking at the feature requests for SUSE Studio on image building and looking at our technologies, we decided to use OBS as the base for our image building service. Since OBS already builds images for various environments, we will first add a new image building GUI to OBS. This combined solution will now be delivered as “SUSE Studio Express”.

(more…)

Planned Downtime to Affect openSUSE Services

October 4th, 2017 by

A scheduled power outage in the Nuremberg office will effect a number of openSUSE services from Oct. 13 at 4 p.m. (16:00 UTC) to Oct. 14  at 4 p.m. (16:00 UTC).

The scheduled maintenance on the building’s electricity will affect most services. The only services that will be normally operating are:
status.opensuse.org
download.opensuse.org
static.opensuse.org
conncheck.opensuse.org

The rest of the services will be fully online on Oct. 15. The Heroes team will try to keep you updated on the situation, and will also send a few reminders (on the opensuse-announce mailing list) before the incident.

Due to technical constraints, the above services will not be available through IPv6 during the outage.

Thank you for your understanding.
On behalf of the openSUSE Heroes Team and the SUSE-IT team.

openSUSE Heroes Spring Into Action

July 19th, 2017 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoMike Tyson might have said it best when he said “everyone has a plan ‘till they get punched in the mouth.”

Tyson’s point is that plans change, especially in the moment of executing a plan and that’s exactly what the openSUSE Heroes did with updating the wikis; minus the punch in the mouth.

Yesterday evening the Heroes planned to move and update some of the localized wikis. Things worked better and faster than expected, and in the end, the openSUSE Heroes moved all 18 localized wikis from Provo to Nuremberg and updated them to MediaWiki 1.27.

This means all openSUSE wikis are now running on MediaWiki 1.27 and support the features announced for the English wiki last week.

Christian Boltz, a humble openSUSE Hero with the power to mass migrate wikis, didn’t have time to change the <feed> tags to the new <rss> tags in all the wikis, which he plans to do in the next few days. Boltz did express a challenge to see what other superhuman powers exist.

“I won’t complain if someone is faster and does it in some of the wikis,” Botlz wrote in an email to the openSUSE Project mailing list.

(more…)

Heroes preparing to make the leap

July 14th, 2017 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoYou might have noticed some normally unwanted activity over the last weeks affecting the openSUSE infrastructure – resulting in reduced availability or downtime of the provided services.

Today we are happy to announce that most of the infrastructure work is done and the openSUSE Heroes together with the SUSE-IT team achieved a lot – ready to welcome openSUSE Leap 42.3 in time!

There might be still the one or the other small issue – but we expect that the majority of services will be stable for now (until we prove something different ;-)

The very good news: while Leap 42.3 is approaching, a couple of machines hosting openSUSE services are already using the latest 42.3 release in production!

That is what we call testing!

So while the Heroes lean back now and let the dust settle for a moment, we are really looking forward to the next steps that are on our TODO  list.

What was done in detail?

(more…)

English openSUSE wiki updated and moved home

July 10th, 2017 by

The English openSUSE wiki has been moved and updated  successfully. If you encounter any issue, please let us know by mail to admin(@)opensuse.org.

On July 11, the MediaWiki instance hosted behind en.opensuse.org was set to read only, with some slight downtimes.

The reason for the downtime was the move of the wiki from the old Provo cluster to the new Nuremberg opensuse network.

Together with the move, the wiki was updated from MediaWiki 1.22 to 1.27, and the VM hosting it from an old SLE version to openSUSE Leap 42.3 (yes, we are eating our own dogfood!)

New features are:

–    including files directly from github -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:GitHub_inclusion

–    namespace-specific boilerplates (page templates) when creating new pages -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:MultiBoilerplate

–    better search (elasticsearch) – now searching all namespaces, but with different weight

–    login is now done using the Auth_remoteuser extension – but still with your openSUSE login

–    support for several map providers

–    switched extension for RSS feed integration (this needs adjustments on the pages that include RSS feeds) -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:RSS_feeds

–    watching a category (when pages get added to or removed from it) is now part of MediaWiki core

–    removal of Hermes notifications – MediaWiki’s own notifications work much better

Please be patient while we are doing the update. We’ll update this article and the status.opensuse.org webpage, plus we’ll send a followup mail to the opensuse-announce mailinglist when everything is done.

After updating the English wiki, we will let the dust settle for some days, and plan to update the localized wikis next week.

Announcing openSUSE’s status page – status.opensuse.org

May 10th, 2017 by
Screenshot Status Page

Screenshot https://status.opensuse.org/

Worried about downtimes and maintenance windows of openSUSE services that you missed because there was no information provided? ;-)

Now is your chance to get informed about any (un-)expected downtime of any openSUSE service!

The openSUSE Heroes team is pleased to announce that status.opensuse.org is up and running as public status page, providing you with the latest updates about our infrastructure.  We tried our best to get the page mobile friendly and easy to understand. Even RSS and Atom feeds are available. A big “thank you” to the team from Cachet, the open source status page system, for developing that great tool.

You wonder where this status page get’s it’s information from?

For the moment, the Heroes will update the page manually with information – until our new monitoring system is up and running and can take over some parts of the job. Thanks to a nice API, updates and status queries can be done even via command line (and therefor integrated in whatever tool you can imagine). But as we want to provide you with the best information available, we might still use a “human form” instead of automatism. Let’s see what the future brings and how familiar we will get with the tool…

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OBS got the power!

February 25th, 2017 by

Old build workers, rack mounted

One year after introducing a new kind of Open Build Service worker machines, the “lambkins”, the openSUSE Build Service got a big hardware refresh. The new machines, sponsored by SUSE, are equipped with:

– 2,8GHz AMD Opteron Processors (6348)

– 256 GB RAM

– one 120 GB SSD

Four of them are located in a chassis with a height of 2 units and run 12-16 workers on them (virtual machines, that are building packages).

That new build power allowed us to remove some of old machines from the pool. The unified hardware makes the management of the machines a lot easier now, even if there are still the most powerful old machines left.

For those who like some more pictures, feel free to check the rest of the entry… (more…)

openSUSE Heroes December meeting – final results

February 25th, 2017 by

While we had some fun and good food and drinks, we also managed to discuss a lot during the three days in the Nuremberg headquarter. This was needed because this was the first time that the Heroes came together in their current form. In the end, we managed to do no coding and even (nearly) no administration – but instead we started to discuss our (internal and external) policies and work flows – and did some decisions regarding the next steps and the future of the openSUSE infrastructure.

openSUSE Heroes meeting

So what are our results – and how does the prioritized action item list look like?

(more…)