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2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Marina Latini

January 26th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 8 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Marina Latini

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

Hello, I’m Marina, and I was born in Italy, in a sunny July about 35 years ago. When I was a kid, I was always curious to discover how things are made, and my sister was always the victim of my curiosity. I broke a countless number of toys due to my need to know! Apart from some justified issues with her, this passion guided me to study computer science, and, in the same period, I finally discovered the FLOSS world.

Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha

Everything started around 2006 when a group of colleagues introduced me to Slackware, which shares a common history with what is nowadays openSUSE. That distro and that group of friends were the best way to learn a lot about GNU/Linux, how to properly recompile a kernel and the importance of knowledge sharing.

In the same group of friends, I also found a special one who shared with me twelve years of his life. After Slackware, the group was involved with Fedora, and we started to contribute actively as Fedora Ambassadors, organizing events in schools, university, and fairs.

In the same period, around 2007, I started to contribute to OpenOffice.org, mainly on localization and quality assurance.

My first encounter with openSUSE was in 2009, where I had the honour to organize the Software Freedom Day 2009 in Perugia together with our group, thanks to the introduction by Andrea Florio and Mariano Iumiento.

For the next four years, while I was promoting openSUSE and Fedora in parallel at various events and conferences, I was always using openSUSE as my main distribution, so I then decided to focus my main activities on that, ending my Fedora Ambassador role in November 2013.

I was one of the first Italian members of the LibreOffice community. I co-founded Associazione LibreItalia, and from 2016 on I am serving as The Document Foundation’s chairperson, being involved in several events, migrations, and trainings related to LibreOffice.

I worked at Studio Storti, an Italian company that provides open source solutions for Public Administrations, leading the LibreOffice Division.

In June 2018, I relocated to Munich, working at CIB mainly in its LibreOffice team as Senior Migrations & Deployments Engineer.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

I’m a proud openSUSE user and Advocate, and I finally decided to try to give something back to the Community and the Project that gave me so much until now.

The openSUSE Board guides the Project and takes care of the needs of its Community. It’s that body that can make the difference. It’s the next step between a group of passionate geeks who are doing funny stuff together, and a professional group of people with a clear vision and mission that can grow a real healthy and international open source project.

I strongly believe that, for having a really healthy Community, we need to start to search where are our users. Social channels are used also by new users who can become new Contributors. As I like to say with friends from other communities, we can have the best software or operating system in the world, but users need to find proper Documentation and get in touch with the local communities.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

One more crucial topic for growing the number of Contributors is closing the gap and improving the Communication between the main Project and the local community. We respect each other, we invest our spare time as volunteers, and need to connect what is considered a local group of Contributors or users, and the others who are part of the international community.

There isn’t a unique recipe for promoting openSUSE that works in each country. Only by listening to the local communities can we improve and grow.

What I would also love to do is to interact much more with other projects that are probably encountering the very same questions. The knowledge sharing is one of the key elements of the open source movement, and we should start to listen to other voices that could come also from outside the openSUSE Project, listening to what is going on around us.

The mix and share of needs and ideas can foster openSUSE much more.

Last, but not least, we need to invest more time in the educational sector.

While interacting with the local communities, we could have the opportunity to organize more activities, for example, with universities, high schools or secondary schools for creating a large user base of Contributors.

I will be glad and honoured to serve the Community as Board Member, sharing what I learned and I’m learning while supporting other communities like Fedora or LibreOffice

Have a lot of fun!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

For the past eight years, already, I have been involved in the LibreOffice community, as well as the local Italian community called LibreItalia, and for the past three years also The Document Foundation’s Board. I had the opportunity to see these groups grow, develop over time, become mature, and seeing easier and harder times, during which we’ve grown closer together.

I want to bring in this experience into the openSUSE Community, help us to grow, work together jointly and at the same time keep the true Community spirit alive.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I am proud and honoured to run for election and serve the Project that has given me so much for many years, already. If the openSUSE Members vote for me, I will bring in all my experience and do all my best to support the Community. With my background from LibreOffice and The Document Foundation, I know the duties and responsibilities of such a role, and I am willing to give my best to keep openSUSE an open, inclusive, welcoming, amazing and – most important – fun Community.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

Life is too short to have only one passion ,and there’s so much more than just a computer, so, besides my activities in free and open source software, I’m a mad goalkeeper and I love using my telescope to look up to the stars (which is where my nickname originates from).

I’m also a music addict: When I’m not listening to the amazing, soul comforting Van Morrison, I play the accordion myself, a hobby which I started at the age of 8.

Contact information

I’m always happy to talk – write me at deneb_alpha AT opensuse.org, ping me on Telegram at @deneb_alpha or contact me on Freenode at deneb_alpha

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Nathan Wolf

January 26th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 9 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Nathan Wolf

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

I started with Linux in 2003 back when you could go into the local software store and buy a boxed set of SUSE, Redhat or Mandrake. So, I started on Mandrake, later Mandriva.

Nathan Wolf aka futureboy and CubicleNate

About 2005, I gave openSUSE my first spin due to better hardware support with dial up modems and sharing the blazing 56 kbaud speed with the other computers on the network. I shifted to openSUSE full time in 2011 after some distro hopping because the structure and layout just made sense as compared to the other available offerings.

I began contributing to openSUSE in 2013 when I had a need to document the process to set up using the smart card system for openSUSE Linux. I compiled the works from several sources to make a repeatable process to properly set up the smart card.

Not long after, I had to start understanding how to install Oracle Java. I updated those instructions on the Wiki and it kind of snowballed from there. I discovered at that point I really enjoy documenting processes of getting things working. Rather than just keep my instructions for myself only, I used the fantastic openSUSE Wiki to share my knowledge.

My day job is working for Whirlpool Corporation in the Advanced Design and Innovation department. I primarily work with CAD. I have worked on proof of concepts in using Virtual Reality systems for design validation and am moderately experienced in using 3D Printers.

As far as hobbies go, beyond playing with anything Linux, I enjoy retro tech; especially the Commodore 64 … well, pretty much anything Commodore, but the 64 was my first computer. I also enjoy baking, and thanks to openSUSE and its many tools, it has made my kitchen life much more efficient.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

In my incredibly biased opinion, I think openSUSE is the best distribution of Linux, but not just for Leap and Tumbleweed, for everything else that goes along with it: The Open Build Service, openQA, Kiwi and YaST. There is an incredible story to be told about what makes openSUSE great.

Whether I am on the openSUSE Board or not, I make it a point to tell this story and share it with whomever is interested. I would like to continue the tell and further refine that story.

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

As an official Member of the Board, it will be my mission to be an Ambassador of the Project to as many Communities of which I am able and share what makes openSUSE great. For reasons that don’t make sense, openSUSE is often not in the broader conversation and it needs to be there. All the fantastic innovations and refinements to Linux and the related open source software need to be told.

My second mission is to do my best to network within the Community to the best of my ability to continue to improve and refine the openSUSE documentation through the Wiki to make openSUSE even more accessible for anyone interested.

It is my ambition to assist in understanding how to work with openSUSE as clear as possible. I want to make the learning process of the openSUSE Project as enjoyable as possible. openSUSE should have the best, clearest, easiest to understand and approachable Wiki out there.

My third mission is a selfish one. It is to make openSUSE the go-to distribution for all things in the engineering and manufacturing industry. Linux has been creeping into the industry more and more, and it only makes sense that openSUSE should be the distribution of choice for the home hobbiest, small and large businesses alike.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Not only are Leap and Tumbleweed technically very sound distributions, but the additional components — OBS, openQA and the Wiki — make it the ideal ecosystem to deploy a targeted spin of the distribution or series of meta packages to bolt onto Leap or Tumbleweed to serve the industry.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I will be open and accessible to openSUSE Members and the Community. I will remain positive and highlight all the good in the Project and the people within it. I will make a concerted effort to improve training and empower users to learn, grow, and own their hardware through openSUSE and it’s tools.

As a Board Member, I will do my best to network with the right individuals to bring about further improvements to the project. I will make it a point to uplift and edify the many Contributors and make sure they know how grateful I am, along with the Community for their time and talents. I want to ensure that openSUSE is the open, welcoming, and grateful community of which to be a part.

Whether I am elected to the Board or not, this entire process is a win for me. I am thrusting myself in front of the openSUSE Community, and in this process, I hope to get to know as many of the wonderful Contributors as possible. My hope is that I become more known, so that I may better Contribute to Documentation and make working with openSUSE even more enjoyable and individually empowering for all.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I have not made it a secret that I am a fan of old tech and especially Commodore.  As a teenager, I made a game for the Amiga in the 1990s called Gator Mania. It is a 2D platform side scrolling game.

I spent well more than a year programming in AMOS Professional where I had to create my own method of displaying the screen tiles with the limited graphics memory, file format for the game levels, level builder, did the pixel art (with the help of an artist friend) and animation and for the time, created the best (in my opinion) character physics I had experienced at the time.

I wanted to do more with the game, but the Amiga fizzled out on me and I sort of moved away from the platform.

Contact information

Email me AT CubicleNate
Email futureboy AT opensuse.org
IRC CubicleNate on Freenode or irc.geekshed.net
Telegram https://t.me/CubicleNate
Webpage CubicleNate.com
Twitter CubicleNate on Twitter

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Vinzenz Vietzke

January 25th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 10 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Vinzenz Vietzke

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

My name is Vinzenz Vietzke, but sticking with the much shorter “vinz” or “vinzv” is what I prefer. I’m 34 years old, live in a small town in southern Germany.

Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv

Like most German Linux users around my age, I made my first steps with S.u.S.E. back in the late 1990s. Over the years, I moved across various distributions and contributed to quite a few of them in different ways. My day job is product management and marketing at Linux hardware vendor TUXEDO Computers.

Starting with just one laptop running openSUSE, we at TUXEDO now offer around 20 different models plus a wide range of desktop PCs with Leap 15 pre-installed. Customers also get free lifetime support for their preinstalled system. Therefore, of course, our free phone/email tech support team need to be trained for openSUSE as well.

For this whole project, I was, and still am, in charge as the tech and project lead to “bring” openSUSE onto TUXEDO’s computers. I got in touch with oS, worked out how and when we get everything done.

In addition to technical affairs, I’m the pushing person at TUXEDO Computers to make our company step up with supporting openSUSE. As a result, since October 2018, we are officially sponsoring the openSUSE project.

We offer any of our models as demo and workshop devices at no cost and take care for the logistics and event booth support. Furthermore we’re sponsoring oSC19 in Nuremberg with demo and install fest machines.

Of course, these things are mainly financial efforts and company internal projects. Yet, to get openSUSE a wider reception, there needs to be someone coordinating, pushing, and taking care. That’s why I call my contributions to openSUSE mostly “meta contributions”.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

Working together with both the Board and openSUSE devs during the last year really was a blast. There were huge efforts, ideas, and helping hands everywhere. And, as I’m no developer myself, serving at the Board would be a way to give something back.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Furthermore, I believe it’s important for the Community to have various candidates to pick from. And as I have the time I kinda feel obliged to at least offer my help.

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

From my perspective, the Board has two main roles: First and foremost, it is some kind of service provider. It serves the whole project as contact point for questions, projects coordination, and pointing in directions, etc.

This is crucial for the whole openSUSE Project and should never be changed, but merely extended if possible.

The second role might be named as “ideas sparking pot”. Most ideas coming from the Community are of a technical nature, which is entirely logical. Just, sometimes, there are things that the whole Project would benefit from, but no one sees them or has time to do so.

This is where the Board could jump in throwing sparks and giving input from someone being able to take a step back for viewing the bigger picture.

My role in this Board Team would both being approachable and helpful, for part one. But, also to give thoughts and ideas when needed, especially in the second part mentioned.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I’ve been into Linux and open source communities for about 10 years now. Though I’m not a long term Contributor for openSUSE, I know how “things work” in such a big, diverse project, and how to handle this stuff.

If you want to get someone with no “Geeko glasses” on you should vote for me. Not that being deeply inside openSUSE’s Community is a bad thing! But I can bring in new perspectives, most of them related to end-users, Windows-ditchers, and the curious, but not tech-savvy, people. I both understand developers and tech people on the one hand, as well as people who are buying Linux preinstalled hardware with little will to tinker around.

This way I act as some proxy between those worlds which in the end might be good for everyone involved.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I am a professionally trained pre-school teacher, which one might find useful for mailing list threads.

Contact information

Email: vinz AT vinzv.de
XMPP: vinz@vinzv.de
IRC: vinzv@freenode

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch

January 23rd, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With less than two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Sarah Julia Kriesch

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

My name is Sarah Julia Kriesch. I am 31 years old and a work-experienced Student in Computer Science with a pre-education as a Computer Science Expert for System Integration. I had worked as a Linux System Administrator for an ISP and a Linux Systems Engineer at a Cloud Computing Provider for 4 years.

Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, incumbent

I am watching my studies as further education in Software Development, I have received the scholarship Aufstiegsstipendium to do that. Firstly, I worked as a Working Student for ownCloud besides my studies. Currently, I am a Student Research Assistant at my home university.

I learned using Linux at the beginning of my dual education in 2009. SLES 10 was my first Linux distribution. I wanted to know more. Therefore, I went to the oSC 11 as my first Linux conference. I met a fantastic openSUSE Community and learned more in 1 week than in 3 years in my education company. So I wanted to join. I was not allowed to contribute to openSUSE during my last year of education, because my education company did not want to see that.

They filtered Google after all contributions in forums and communities. That‘s the reason for my anonymous nickname AdaLovelace at openSUSE. I had to wait for joining openSUSE again until my first job in 2012 where I worked together with Contributors/ Members of Debian, FreeBSD and Fedora.

I started with German translations at openSUSE with half a year of work experience. Most of you know me from oSCs (since 2011). I was Member of the Video Team, the Registration Desk and contributed as a Speaker. Since 2013 I am wiki maintainer in the German/ English wiki and admin there. I report bugs if I find some and create feature requests.

Since 2014 I am an active Advocate in Germany. I give yearly presentations, organize booths and take part in different Open Source Events. I have switched to events in the UK during my Study Abroad Semester in the last year. In addition, I am the Global/ German Coordinator Localization and one Founder of the Heroes Team.

I contribute and support if I watch something needed. The open source education is such a case. So I founded the Working Group Open Source at the Nuremberg Institute of Technology because our lecturer for Linux Development has left our university a short time before my first day there. I am teaching foundations for open source development, Linux installations, shell programming and more together with my team and community volunteers.

Other universities have forked this concept for Computer Science with open source workshops. Additionally, we are bringing openSUSE forward at different faculties at our university. We are working on our IT project to migrate the Linux laboratory to openSUSE Leap with Kerberos this semester.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

I am staying behind the openSUSE Community and want to have happy Community Members. My role in the openSUSE Board has been to do right decisions and to resolve conflicts. I support if somebody needs that. I represent openSUSE and receive feedback from our users. I want to continue that all.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi
2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Two years are more quickly left than you can imagine and I am running for re-election for the openSUSE Board!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

I try to receive new Contributors to our community with education. Qualified new Contributors are required to receive promising future prospects for openSUSE. Additionally, I want to concentrate more on the well-being of the openSUSE Community. You don‘t receive new Contributors if you don‘t have the correct climate in the community. I want to build that on the introduction of the Board publicity by our elected Board Members in the last year.

That would improve the collaboration and respect within openSUSE. Another election pledge is the switch from DVDs to USB flash drives in the marketing material.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I am well connected inside and outside of openSUSE with a big open source network. I know most important people in the community and desire to create the best decisions for you with the view of a Computer Scientist with Sysadmin experience. I am desperate to become a long term openSUSE Contributor. So I don’t want to change the Community.

I have been an openSUSE Board Member in the last 2 years and you know me in this position. I am much obliged to be an elected Board Member for additional 2 years.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I am educated by communities and want to do so, too. I contribute to open source to improve the world.

Contact information

Email: sarah.kriesch AT opensuse.org
Blog: https://sarah-julia-kriesch.eu
facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sarahjulia.kriesch
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-julia-kriesch-16874b82
Connect: https://connect.opensuse.org//pg/profile/AdaLovelace
Github: https://github.com/skriesch





2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Dr. Axel Braun

January 22nd, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With less than two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Dr. Axel Braun

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

I’m an electrical engineer by education, and wrote my PhD about helical shieldings of medium-voltage XLPE cables. That was already in the pre-Google era as I’m 57 in between.

Currently I work as a business consultant for mostly large companies. Supply chain topics, introduction of ERP systems (I have a long SAP history) and program or project management. Most of these projects are international, with teams located across all timezones.

Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB

I started with S.u.S.E. in the late 90’s, as OS/2 was about to disappear, and there was no real other operating system alternative available (this is still true, but thats a different story). SuSE at that time had the nice boxes with tons of floppies and a printed manual. Great!

The advantage over other distros was, that is was easy to handle for an end-user (YaST….). Not every release change went smooth (not to forget, there were a couple of technical changes on the road) but for me it worked mostly.

My contribution to openSUSE nowadays is mostly the maintenance of various packages, as well as every now and then support on mailing lists – but mostly there are more skilled people than I am who are faster in answering.

My main focus is the packaging of GNU Health, which is a free (as in freedom) health and hospital information system. Setting-up an ERP System is not like installing a browser, and its the biggest challenge for most users.

The goal was to make installation easy to for non-technical users, and we have reached this so far! As Ludwig Nussel has given the encouragement, GNU Health is now shipped with the Leap Standard Distribution. Currently the new release is on the way to Factory, to have it shipped with Leap 15.1.

Some other packages are on my list: I have just packages OnionShare, to safely share files via a TOR Onion Service, converted the hylafax+ package from cron to systemd-timers, and started packaging the Orthanc Server (to display medical images in DICOM format) for openSUSE. For the plugins there will be some nodejs knowledge required….feel free to contact me if you want to help!

Any my life outside of tech and work? I have 2 kids of 20 and 25 which I only see randomly, but which leaves room for activities: Going sailing and surfing, ski and snowboard, running (only short distances, knee problems stopped me from running marathons), motorbiking (knee slider are not used anymore, did a restoration on a 1978 Yamaha DT 400 MX, a two-stroke Enduro) and an old cars that wants to be driven in the sunshine.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

First of all, I think openSUSE is the best distro on the market (my fully subjective view, of course). Second, I’m committed to the philosophy of free software, and free software is about collaboration.

The current board has done an incredibly good job, and I would like to help with continuing the work in order to support and grow the Community. I feel we all share the same target: To build the best Distro in the market, and still have a lot of fun with this!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

I will try to move openSUSE out of the server room and more on to the desktop of users. It is more than mature for every-day-usage.

Companies, especially those in the public sector, should be encouraged in the use of free software and open standards, to gain back digital sovereignty, save costs and increase security and privacy. Here we should enter discussions with officials. Ideally.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi
2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

I know it is difficult as this is not a topic to gain votes for officials. But I feel if we address this as a whole community, it has more impact than talking as individuals.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

Because it would be a mistake not to do it! LOL

Seriously, though, I have not only a technical, but as well a business view on certain topics, I feel this can add to the skillset of the board

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

Well, no scary hidden secrets that come to my mind.

But there are always incidents that are scary when they happen, but look funny afterwards. Traveling is always good for unexpected incidents: In 2001 I was visiting a customer production site 200km south of Warsaw in Poland.

Highways in Poland at that time were 2 lane roads, with horse and cart on the right lane, and pedestrians crossing. Every now and then the speed is reduced to 70. Of course I missed this, because I was on the phone and driving, and got stopped by the police.

I stepped out of the car and brought out my only two Polish words, Dzień dobry (Good day!)! The policemen started shouting at me in Polish, and after we clarified the language obstacles he made clear (in broken english) that I drove 97 instead of 70, and should follow to the police-car.

In the car they wanted a fine, which I was willing to pay, but I had no Zloty,
and only 10 or 20 Deutschmark in Cash. So they asked “What can we do?”

“Well,” I said, “can I pay with credit card?”

They looked at me like an alien, then at each other and discussed in Polish. No, that would not be possible. What can we do?

“Hm,” I said, “can we drive to an ATM (cash machine)?”. I felt like I was standing with one
leg in jail already.

Once again, they looked at me, then at each other and discussed in Polish. No, that would not be possible. What can we do?

I felt the second leg was moving into jail…so in honey words I prayed this really lovely country and the nice people, but if we have no way to pay the fine, I can only express my sincere apologies, and swear I will never drive too fast again.

They stared at me……handcuffs now?

After another internal discussion, and to my big surprise, they let me go, but I should make sure “they never catch me again”. For sure, I drove really slowly.

When I arrived at the plant, I told the story to the manager, and he laughed loud: “You stupid! ‘What can we do’ usually means they want slush money!”

That was a thing that was completely out of my mind

Contact information

Email: DocB AT opensuse.org
IRC: DocB on freenode
Twitter: @coogor





First Two Candidates for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections Announced

January 9th, 2019 by

The Elections Committee announced today, Tuesday, January 8, 2019, the first two Candidates who have passed the application and eligibility process and are declared as officially running for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections as the January 13 deadline for Candidate Applications is swiftly approaching.

Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, incumbent

Outgoing Board Member Sarah Julia Kriesch, aka AdaLovelace, is seeking her second term on the Board as an encumbent.  Sarah, from Nuremberg, Germany, is a work-experienced student in Computer Science at the Nuremberg Institute of Technology and has been working as a Student Research Assistant.

A very active openSUSE Contributor, Sébastien Poher, has also thrown his hat into the ring for the first time and is bringing energy and an impressive list of openSUSE activity to the elections race.

Three openSUSE Board Seats Vacant

Three Board Seats are vacant in this election with the January 13 deadline to apply as a Candidate looming.  Eligibility to run for the Board positions is based on having an openSUSE Membership in Good Standing, so anyone who qualifies still has a few days left to join the Elections process and give the Members a good variety of choices for these important positions.

More Candidates are Required

The Project is best served if it has a good variety of openSUSE Enthusiasts to choose from during the Elections.

Members who are willing to step up and pay things forward by serving on the openSUSE Board are urged to apply by sending an application to the Project Mailing List and to the Elections Officials following the instructions on the official Elections page.

openSUSE Membership Drive Still Underway

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members, and it is especially important for the Elections process.  Applications for openSUSE Membership are accepted and processed on an ongoing basis, but a Membership Drive has been declared by the Elections Officials in an effort to get as many qualified Project Contributors to take part in the voting process, which is scheduled to begin February 4, 2019, and run for 12 days with ballots closing February 15.

All openSUSE Contributors and Members are requested to actively urge other Contributors who are not Members to get their Membership and get out and vote.  All Members who have been approved by the Membership Committee before the start of balloting February 4 will be eligible to vote in this election.

You can apply for openSUSE Membership by following the instructions here.

 

 

No Candidates? Board might be forced to hand pick new Board Members

January 4th, 2019 by

There are less than 10 days left to apply as a Candidate for the openSUSE Board Elections, yet as of this date, no eligible Candidates have stepped up to run for the three vacant Board Member Seats.  If there are no Candidates by the closing date of January 13, 2019, the three remaining members of the openSUSE Board will be tasked to choose new Board Members, based on their own personal choices, to fill those three vacant seats.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Healthy Project Needs Members

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members, and if enough of those Members step up to participate in the duties performed by the various openSUSE teams.  That includes serving as Members of the openSUSE Board, which is best chosen by the openSUSE Members in the voting process.

Is openSUSE Worth It to You?

In order for that to happen, the Project needs several openSUSE Enthusiasts to pay it forward by stepping up to run in the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections and thus provide a full slate of Quality Candidates.  Therefore, the Elections Committee is appealing for those contributors who believe openSUSE is a Project worth keeping alive to forward their applications as Candidates in the upcoming elections.

Deadline is Approaching Fast

In order to do that, you must have an openSUSE Membership in Good Standing.  If you do not have a Membership, yet would like to show your dedication to openSUSE by running for the Board, you need to get your Membership Application in immediately so it is approved before the January 13 Candidate Application deadline.

You can apply for openSUSE Membership by following the instructions here.

You can apply to run as an openSUSE Board Candidate by sending e-mail to:

More information can be found here and here.

 

… and we can get the 2018-2019 Board Elections underway.

 

Request Travel Support for openSUSE Conference 2019

December 18th, 2018 by

The Travel Support Program (TSP) provides travel sponsorships to openSUSE community who want to attend the openSUSE conference and need financial assistance. The openSUSE conference 2019 will be in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 to May 26.

The goal of the TSP is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to attend the openSUSE Conference!

When and how

Requests for the TSP for this year’s openSUSE Conference have until April 12 to submit their request.

Remember: All requests will be managed through the TSP application at http://connect.opensuse.org/travel-support.

You will need an openSUSE Connect account in order to login to the application and apply for sponsorship. Please be sure to fulfill all of your personal details at openSUSE connect account to avoid delays or negative request. A good application with good information will be processed faster.

A few reminders

  • Please read the TSP page carefully before you apply.
  • Any information you send to the Travel Committee will be private.
  • We want everybody there! Even if you think you would not qualify for the travel support, just submit and make it worth! If you don’t try you won’t get!tips
  • If you submitted an abstract to be presented you should mention it in your application.
  • The Travel Committee can reimburse up to 80% of travel and/or lodging costs. That includes hotel, hostel, plane,train, bus, even gas for those willing to drive. Remember, no taxi!
    • Important: Food and all local expenses are on you!
  • We want to sponsor as many people as possible so please check the best deal.
  • The Travel Committee won’t be able to book or pay anything in advance. The reimbursement will be done after the event finishes and based on your expenses receipts.
  • no receipts = no money It is the rule! (Original receipts are required from German residences.)

If you have any question regarding your trip to the conference do not hesitate to ask the TSP or oSC19 organizers.

We hope to see you there!

openSUSE Enthusiast Creates Board Elections Poster to Encourage Participation

December 18th, 2018 by

One of the growing community of openSUSE enthusiasts in Indonesia has contributed a poster he designed for the 2018-2019 Board Elections and Membership Drive.

Aris Winardi

Aris Winardi giving a presentation at the openSUSE Asia Summit 2016 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Aris Winardi, from Bogor, West Java, Indonesia, wants to inspire the openSUSE Community and Members to get involved in the Elections process and make it the best one yet.

The goal is to encourage all from the Community who are Contributors to the Project to apply for and get their openSUSE Membership, which will give them the right to vote in the upcoming elections and also some extra recognition of the work they do to keep the Project alive.

A developer by day, mostly working in JavaScript/Android/Flutter, Aris loves to help create artwork for open source communities. You can find him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/winardiaris and as twitter user @winardiaris.

 

Three of Six Board Seats to be Decided

There are currently three of the six seats up for election to the openSUSE Board, with no declared Candidates at this time, giving the opportunity to help guide the current and future path of the organization.

Last spring, the elections included an impressive list of quality candidates in an election that was the longest election period in the history of the project elections, with 237 out of 400 Members voting: A record participation in percentage and actual numbers.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

This year, the Elections Committee wants to exceed that record, and has announced an eight-week Membership Drive to coincide with the first five weeks of the Candidate Nomination phase, continuing through the three-week Campaign phase that follows.

openSUSE Users are Asked to Pitch In

With that in mind, the Elections Committee, along with the help of enthusiasts such as Aris, would like all openSUSE Users who appreciate the hard work and dedication that goes into the creation of such an awesome Operating System to prompt everyone they know who is contributing to apply for their Membership.

A healthy Membership leads to a healthy openSUSE Project.

How many contributors do you know?

Have you asked them if they are openSUSE Members?

Are you encouraging them to take out their Membership, if they are not, or are you suggesting they run as Candidates in the upcoming Board Elections, if they are Members?

That is a quick contribution you can easily make to openSUSE starting right now, so you can do your part to pay it forward.

Asian Community Contribution Challenge

The growing Asian Community, including the Indonesian region, is showing great enthusiasm for openSUSE and would like to encourage even more contributions and participation in the Project.

There are many ways to contribute, just check the Membership page for a quick list of some of the ways, and check out the contributor portal for more.

2018-2019 Elections Underway with Calls for Candidates and New Members

December 13th, 2018 by

Earlier this week, on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, the Elections Committee posted the Schedule for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections, along with the announcement of a Membership Drive and a call for nominations and applications for Candidates to fill three vacant seats on the openSUSE Board.

The annual Board Elections are normally expected to run in November and December, with ballots cast and results published in time for the newly-elected Board Members to take their seats on the Board at the beginning of January. However, some additional work needed to be completed for this election, and the elections were delayed in part to accommodate the additional work.

A healthy Project requires a healthy and energetic Board, and that especially requires a healthy and energetic Membership composed of openSUSE Contributors, both to provide a slate of quality candidates and an enthusiastic group of engaged Contributors, to vote for candidates who best reflect their views for the future and the drive forward of the Project.

With that in mind, the current openSUSE Board — at the urging and with the full co-operation of the Elections Committee — clarified and updated the requirements for openSUSE Membership based on earlier engagements with the Community and a subsequent Board vote, as officially required under the Membership Rules, conducted at the annual Face to Face Board meeting earlier this year.

The changes to the rules are meant to ensure that all openSUSE Contributors have the opportunity to become a Member and to participate in the Guidance of the Project, as potential Board Candidates and as voters.

To encourage more participation in the Project, the Elections Committee announced the start of an eight-week Membership Drive in conjunction with the Call for Candidates. All Contributors who are not already Members are urged to apply for Membership, and all Members and Contributors are urged to encourage fellow Contributors and their associates to apply for Membership. More Members will also mean more Contributors, and more Contributors mean a healthier, stronger Project.

The Elections Committee would like to see the entire Community get behind this Membership Drive and participate in this Elections process.

Links for Board Candidate Nominations, applications for Candidacy, and applications for Community Membership, along with links to eligibility, can be found on the official 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections page at https://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Board_election