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Marvell, TUXEDO Computers Sponsor openSUSE Project

November 6th, 2018 by

Two companies were recently added to the openSUSE Sponsors page thanks to the companies generous donations to the openSUSE Project.

Both Marvell and TUXEDO Computers have provided tangible support through donations to openSUSE to promote the use and development of Linux.

“We are thoroughly pleased to have Marvell and TUXEDO Computers as sponsors of the openSUSE Project,” said Richard Brown, chairman of the openSUSE Board. “The sponsorships support and encourage open-software development. Multiple Linux distributions and the open-source community will benefit greatly from the equipment.”

Marvell, which recently completed the acquisition of Cavium, offers a broad portfolio of infrastructure solutions. Marvell donated a ThunderX2 system to the openSUSE Project. The Dual-System-on-Chip machine with 256GB RAM and 240GB SSD will extend the existing fleet of ARM build hardware. This 64-bit ThunderX2 system will bring an additional 40 ARMv8 (AArch64) concurrent build jobs to the openSUSE Open Build Service, which can now provide its users with faster AArch64 package and installation image builds.

TUXEDO Computers makes Linux hardware, notebooks and more. The company, which offers its TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 with Leap 15 preinstalled, has offered to send volunteers running openSUSE booths at conferences a TUXEDO laptop for demo purposes, which will need to be returned to TUXEDO Computers after demoing it at a conference. Volunteers who wish to demo a TUXEDO laptop at a summit, conference or other open-source technology event can request a demo laptop through a trusted person in the openSUSE. The trusted person will decide on eligibility of the volunteer on behalf of TUXEDO Computers. Contact the openSUSE Board or an openSUSE member if you are interested. TUXEDO Computers will send out the laptop and handle return shipping.

GSoC 2018 Mentor Summit

October 27th, 2018 by

David Kang and I attended two weeks ago (12-14 Oct) the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) Mentor Summit in California representing openSUSE. :sunny: Here is our report of the conference.

It was an incredibly well organized event with a busy schedule. It was our first summit (we try that different openSUSE mentors/org admins go every year) and we enjoyed it a lot and found it really useful. Apart from attending many sessions about open source, mentoring and GSoC, we had the opportunity to meet and have interesting conversations with other org admins and mentors, as well as with the Google open source team and other Googlers. In total 314 mentors and org admins from 42 countries attended the events. This was a great chance to collect chocolate from all around the world for the chocolate bar table, which has already become a tradition at the summit. :chocolate_bar:

chocolate table David and Ana in San Francisco

The summit follows the unconference format, which means that the sessions are decided and organized by the attendees. Those are the most outstanding sessions from the ones David and I attended.

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openSUSE to have Summit at Southern California Linux Expo

October 1st, 2018 by

The openSUSE Project will have a summit at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE) at the Pasadena Convention Center in Pasadena, Calif., March 8, 2019.

The openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x will take place on a Friday during the beginning of SCaLE 17x, which takes place March. 7-10, 2019. The community hosted summit will have its own full-day schedule and talks for the openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x need to be submitted through events.opensuse.org rather than SCaLE’s CfP tool. SCaLE attendees and community members are encouraged to submit a talk for the summit. The call for papers for the openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x is open until January 10, 2019.

Registration for the event is open and more information about the openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x will be available in February. The openSUSE community plans to have booth and a lounge at SCaLE 17x.

The openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x is the first of three openSUSE events schedule for the spring of 2019. A month after the openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x there will be an openSUSE Summit Nashville April 5 through April 6, 2019, and the annual openSUSE Conference 2019 will be May 24 through May 26, 2019.

Contact ddemaio (@) opensuse.org if you have any questions concerning the summit.

openSUSE Conference 2020: Call for Hosts

September 25th, 2018 by

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce that it is accepting proposals for openSUSE Conference 2020. The Call for Hosts will be open until April 15, 2019.

The openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will review the submissions with the hopes of having a decision announced about the location of oSC20 at the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany. Community members and open-source enthusiasts are encouraged to follow the Conference How To guide on the wiki to submit a proposal on hosting the conference. The guide offers a How to Bid and How to Checklist to help with submitting a proposal.

The proposals will need to be submitted to the openSUSE Marketing mailing list and the openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will discuss the proposals as it plans this year’s conference.

While the openSUSE Project intends to move the conference to different worldwide locations in the future, the project has two locations (Nuremberg, Germany, and Prague, Czech Republic) to host the annual community conference if no proposals are submitted during the Call for Hosts.

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openSUSE to Have Summit in Nashville

September 18th, 2018 by

The openSUSE community is headed to Nashville, Tennessee, next year and will have the openSUSE Summit Nashville April 5 through April 6, 2019, during the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

Registration for the event is open and the Call for Papers is open until Jan. 15. Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encourage to register for the summit and submit a talk.

The schedule for the openSUSE Summit Nashville will be released at the beginning of February.

There is one openSUSE/open source track. There are three talks that can be submitted for the openSUSE Summit Nashville. One is a short talk with a 15-minute limit; the other talk that can be submitted is a long talk with a 45-minute limit. A 90-minute workshop is also an available option for people submitting a talk for the summit.

Attendees of  SUSECON are also welcome to attend and submit talks. openSUSE Summit Nashville is a free community event that will take place on the last day of SUSECON and the Saturday that follows SUSECON.

Contact ddemaio (@) opensuse.org if you have any questions concerning the summit.

openSUSE.Asia Summit

September 5th, 2018 by

openSUSE.Asia Summit is an annual conference organized since 2014 every time in a different Asian city. Although it is a really successful event, which plays a really important role in spreading openSUSE all around the world, it is not an event everybody in openSUSE knows about. Because of that I would like to tell you about my experience attending the last openSUSE.Asia Summit, which took place on August 10-12 in Taipei, Taiwan.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 group picture

Picture by COSCUP under CC BY-SA from https://flic.kr/p/2ay7hBD

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Registration, CfP for openSUSE Conference 2019 Open

August 31st, 2018 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19), which takes place in Nuremberg, Germany, are open.

The dates for this year’s conference will be May 24 through May 26 once again at the Z-Bau. Submission for the call for papers will be open until Feb 3. Registration for the conference is open until the day oSC19 begins.

Presentations can be submitted in one of the following formats:

  • Lightning Talks (15 mins)
  • Short Talks (30 mins)
  • Normal Talks (45 mins)
  • Long Workshop (3 hours)
  • Short Workshop (90 mins)

The tracks listed for the conference are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

While these tracks might be refined to better categorize or consolidate topics, people should submit proposals even if they don’t think it fits into one of the tracks.

A Program Committee will evaluate the proposals based on the submitted abstracts and the accepted proposals will be announced mid February.

Volunteers who would like to participate on the Program Committee or the Organizing Team for the conference should email ddemaio (@) suse.de.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19.

openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

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openSUSE Leap 42.3 End of Life is Extended

August 8th, 2018 by

The usual lifetime of openSUSE Leap minor versions have traditionally received updates for about 18 months, but the minor version of Leap 42.3 is being extended.

The last minor version of the Leap 42 series was scheduled to be maintained until January 2019, but that has changed thanks to SUSE committing to additional months of maintenance and security updates. Leap 42.3 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack (SP) 3  and SUSE has agreed to keep publishing updates for Leap 42.3 until June 2019.

This means the extended End of Life for Leap 42.3 will increase the total lifetime of the Leap 42 series to 44 months.

Users of the openSUSE Leap 42 series are encouraged to use the additional months to prepare the upgrade to Leap 15, which was released in May.

Those who can’t migrate production servers to the new major version in time may want to take a (commercial) SLE subscription into consideration, which provides even a longer lifecycle. The proximity of Leap 42’s base system to SLE 12 keeps the technical effort to migrate workflows from Leap to SLE low.

 

GSoC Half Way Through

July 20th, 2018 by

As you may already know, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. Our students started working already two months ago. Ankush, Liana and Matheus have passed the two evaluations successfully and they are busy hacking to finish their projects. Go on reading to find out what they have to say about their experience, their projects and the missing work for the few more weeks. 😀

Ankush Malik

Ankush is improving people collaboration in the Hackweek tool and he has already made many great contributions like the emoticons, similar project section and notifications features. In fact, the Hackweek 17 was just last week, so in the last days a lot of people have already been using these great new features. There were a lot of good comments about his work! :cupid: and we also received a lot of feedback, as you can for example see in the issues list.

But even more important than all the functionality, is all Ankush is learning while coding and working with his mentors and the openSUSE community, such as working with AJAX in Ruby on Rails, good coding practices and better coding style.

The last part of his project will include some more new features. If you want to find out more about his project and the challenges that Ankush expects to have, read his interesting blog post:

https://medium.com/@ankushmalik631/how-my-gsoc-project-is-going-4942614132a2

Hackweek tool screenshot

Xu Liana

Liana is working on integrating Cloud Pinyin (the most popular input method in China) on ibus-libpinyin. For her, GSoC is being an enjoyable learning process full of challenges. With the help of her mentors she has learnt about autotools and she builds now her code without graphical build tools. 💪 For the few more weeks, she plans to learn about algorithmics that are useful for the project and, after finish the coding part, she would like to go deeper in the fundamentals of compiling. Read it from her owns word in her blog post:

https://liana.hillwoodhome.net/2018/07/14/the-first-half-of-the-project-during-gsoc-libpinyin

Matheus de Sousa Bernardo

Matheus is working in Trollolo, a cli-tool which helps teams using Trello to organize their work. He has been mainly focused on the restructuring of commands and the incomplete backup feature. The discussion with his mentors made him take different implementation paths than the ones he had in mind at the beginning, learning the importance of keeping things simple. It has been complicated for Matheus to find time for both the GSoC project and his university duties. But he still has some more weeks to implement the more challenging feature, the automation of Trollolo! 💥

Check his blog post with more details about the project: https://matheussbernardo.me/gsoc/2018/07/08/midterm

 

I hope you enjoyed reading about the work and experiences of the openSUSE students and mentors. Keep tuned as there are still some more hacking weeks and the students will write a last blog post summarizing their GSoC experience. 😉

 


This blog post original version can be found at http://anamaria.martinezgomez.name/2018/09/05/opensuse-asia-summit.html This blog post’s content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License