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Hack Week Announced for Mid-November

October 9th, 2017 by

Hack Week 0x10 will be Nov. 10 – 16 at many of the SUSE Research and Development locations and developers and hackers from the community are welcomed to participate.

Hack Week is a week-long event where members of the openSUSE community, along with other communities, get a chance to investigate interesting technologies and get involved in promising new or existing projects.

The event focuses not only on building and expanding technology, but brings people with similar interests together to hack for fun. There are several successful stories that have come from previous Hack Weeks like  Jangouts, which is open-source video conferencing software.

The planning of the projects for Hack Week 0x10 can be created on http://hackweek.suse.com. Hackers who want to participate can also join existing projects. One example of a project that has already be created putting openSUSE on Chromebooks.

Visitors must be logged in to the website to create and join projects. To join the event at one of the locations, email hackweek@suse.de to be connected to a site manager at an SUSE R&D facility.

To learn more about Hack Week 0x10, visit https://hackweek.suse.com/about.

Are Governments Held Hostage? Why openSUSE Supports Public Money Public Code

September 13th, 2017 by

Public Money? Public Code! from Free Software Foundation Europe on Vimeo.

Europeans can disagree on political issues, but there is one issue the open-source community is bringing to the political spectrum that many citizens can find agreement about; publicly funded software has to be Free and Open Source Software.

“Public institutions spend millions of euros each year on the development of new software tailored to their needs,” according to a release from the non-profit advocacy group Free Software Foundation Europe. “The procurement choices of the public sector play a significant role in determining which companies are allowed to compete and what software is supported with tax payers’ money.

To bring awareness to this issue, FSFE started the “Public Money Public Code” campaign at https://publiccode.eu, which was originally revealed by Matthias Kirschner during the keynote at the openSUSE Conference, and the openSUSE Project encourages all its members and open source enthusiasts to sign the open letter addressed to European politicians about this important public issue. This can also be achieved with the sharing of videos on the topic.

There are many reasons for why code of publicly-funded software projects should be freely available for people to study, develop, enhance and use.

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GNU Health, openSUSE Pioneer Shift in Healthcare Management

March 13th, 2017 by

The GNU Health Project is one of many noble open-source projects and the openSUSE Project is pleased to announce it has donated 10 Raspberry Pis to help expand the use and development of the project on affordable ARM hardware.

GNU Health, which is a non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO), delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

“Running GNU Health  on an inexpensive computer like a Raspberry Pi really brings GNU Health’s vision of freedom and equity in health care closer to reality,” said Richard Brown, chairman of the openSUSE Project. “Think of the possibilities devices like these have to improve healthcare management and patient care using GNU Health.”

Raspberry Pis are full-blown computers with a huge potential for GNU Health and the industry, said Luis Falcón, founder of the GNU Health Project. For example, they can be used in real-time monitoring of vital signs in hospital settings and retrieving information from laboratory instruments for Personal Health Records at research and academic institutions.

“The fact that they come with openSUSE and GNUHealth pre-installed on Raspberry Pi, allows for fast deployment in many different contexts,” Falcón said, referring to the Raspberry Pi being put to field use.

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Mesa, Kernel, Wireshark update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

January 11th, 2017 by

There were plenty of Tumbleweed snapshots leading up to the holiday season and openSUSE’s rolling release is gliding into 2017 with several new packages on the horizon.

The last snapshot of 2016, 20161226, updated the Linux Kernel to 4.9, which was a good way to end the year. Several packages were updated in the snapshot including Python3-setuptools to version 31.0.0, gnome-online-accounts 3.22.3, NetworkManager 1.4.4 and yast2-network 3.2.17.

NetworkManager changed the order in which IP addresses are configured is now preserved so that primary address is selected correctly.  Yast2-network enabled DHCP_HOSTNAME listbox only when wicked service is used.

The biggest update in the first 2017 snapshot, 20170104, was the several KDE Plasma 5.8.5 packages that were updated. Samba updated to version 4.5.3 and fixed CVE-2016-2123.

Mozilla Thunderbird’s update to version 45.6 fixed a couple security and memory bugs.

The library offering an Application Programming Interface to access secure communication protocols called GnuTLS updated to version 3.5.7, fixed several bugs and set limits on the maximum number of alerts handled.

Also in the snapshot, Wireshark fixed User Interface bugs with an update to version 2.2.3, newbie-friendly text-editor nano updated to 2.7.3 and libvirt-python added new APIs and constants with the update to 2.5.0.

The 20170109 snapshot provided a cleaned up configuration settings for Mesa, so it can be uniform across all architectures except for list of Direct Rendering Infrastructure and Gallium drivers. Btrfsprogs 4.9 clean up was well and offers better handling of file system snapshots. Python3-setuptools updated to 32.3.1, which is fixed regressions and compatibility  issues from previous versions.

Organize an openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Party

November 17th, 2016 by

Having a party to celebrate an achievement is always great and the openSUSE community knows how to party; just look at all the fun we have at openSUSE conferences and summits.

With the release of openSUSE Leap 42.2, a release party is in order. Selecting a good date and having some goodies to pass out to the party requires some planning. The checklist below can help with planning the release party, but the most important thing if you plan on having a party is to email ddemaio (at) suse.de well before the party to get some open-source goodies to give away. Please include “Leap 42.2” Party in the subject line and include a mailing address.

checklist:

  1. Find a date.

The date of a party is best during a weekend (because it’s easier for people to join, since most people work during the week), but we all function differently. Find two alternative dates for the party if you want and use http://www.doodle.com/ to find a common date that works for most people.

  1. Find a place

A cafe, bar or Linux group meetup location all work. A coffee and cake release party is just as fun as a beer and pizza release party with the benefit of not having a headache. If music is your group’s thing, try a release party with openSUSE karaoke. There are tons of SUSE songs to choose from on it’s YouTube play list.

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  1. Cake

It is not necessary to have a cake, but it sure is a lot of fun. You can also have openSUSE Cookies. We plan on having a few at the release party in Nuremberg, Germany, on Nov. 24 starting at 5 p.m.

  1. Pictures, pictures, pictures

Bring one or more cameras to take pictures or videos and post them to social media. Tagging the photos with #GeekoParty

  1. Swag

PromoDVDs, webcam covers and stickers – If we can get it to you without too much red tape from governments, we will. Just email that ddemaio guys.

IMPORTANT TIP: Schedule your release party on the wiki and have a lot of fun.

Last Release Candidate for openSUSE Leap 42.2 Released

November 2nd, 2016 by

The development cycle for openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidates (RC) is coming to an end.

RC2, which will be followed by the stable release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 on Nov. 16, is now available for testers after its release today.

“A big change is that the Mesa Nouveau 3D driver was split out to a
separate package as KDE crashes with it on some newer NVidia cards,” wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List.

Users of Leap’s newest version will notice improved capabilities with snapper snapshots based on the btrfs file system, which is the default file system selection. A new btrfs quota concept makes snapper much less disk-hungry and can be manually setup. Snapper is a poka yoke and can give system administrators confident about updating new packages and rolling back the system if an error is made. There is a selection of other file systems for Leap, but benefits of snapper are not available with the other file systems.

Leap is a community-enterprise distribution that appeals to stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters. Leap has a shared core with SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) and hundreds of SLE 12 Service Pack (SP) 2 packages. There are also thousands of community-built packages in Leap. The distribution gives developers and organizations an ability to bridge to the faster release cycles of openSUSE Tumbleweed or to a more Long Term Support enterprise solution with SLE.

Media who are interested in more information should contact Douglas DeMaio at ddemaio@suse.de.

Tumbleweed Gets Two New Kernels

October 26th, 2016 by

In less than a week, openSUSE Tumbleweed had two snapshots that included new Linux Kernels.

Snapshot 20161020 brought users Linux Kernel 4.8.3 and and four days later snapshot 20161024 brought the 4.8.4 Linux Kernel. A kernel patch for the Dirty Cow security vulnerability (CVE-2016-5195) came quickly to the rolling release and was available by Saturday.

The snapshots in between the two kernel snapshots brought timezone updates in  snapshot 20161023 and KDE updates with snapshot 20161022.

Snapshot 20161022 fixed a three-year-old bung in ghostscript fixing CVE-2013-5653.

The snapshot also updated Plasma to version 5.8.2, the cross-distro collaboration package AppStream to 0.10.0 and python3-setuptools to 28.6.1. Php 5 updated to version 5.6.27 adding several subpackages and fixing several security bugs in the release.

KDE’s newest 5.8 version, which is an Long Term Support version for Plasma, provided subpackages for openSUSE branding and fix some bugs for Bluedevil and Breeze.

Tumbleweed gets new Wayland, FreeType, Digikam

October 13th, 2016 by

dododotsA couple of snapshots have been released since the last Tumbleweed update, but in those two snapshots were an enormous amount of package updates.

Snapshot 20161003 was the first snapshot to arrive in Tumbleweed during the month of October and it brought two new major version packages.

Digikam 5.2.0 was updated in the repository and the release introduces a new red eyes tool that automates the red-eyes effect reduction process, which was from a new algorithm written by a Google Summer of Code 2016 student named Omar Amin.  Python3-setuptools to 28.0.0 was the other package that received a major version upgrade.

Wayland 1.12.0 was updated in the repositories and the snapshot also brought Qt 5.7.0, Lightdm 1.19.5 and Libreoffice 5.2.2.2. Mono moved to version 4.6, but most of the fixes in this version seemed to address Mac and Window user crashes.

The other snapshot that came out in October was the 20161010 snapshot.  FreeType was updated to version 2.7, which has the new subpixel hinting mode as the default, emulating a modern version of ClearType. WireShark 2.2.1 now fixes vulnerabilities that cause a Bluetooth crash. A subpackage for VLC will give users installing vlc-codecs a prompt to replace the distro-provided libavcodec package, requires the user to accept a vendor change.

User can expect two new kernels in the rolling release soon. Kernel 4.7.6 is expected soon and Kernel 4.8 is currently being staged so it looks like Tumbleweed might not be running the 4.7 kernel very long.

Beta 3 Release Updates FireFox, KDE Applications, VirtualBox

October 5th, 2016 by

The openSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta 3 was released today one day ahead of schedule and the last beta for 42.2 brought quite a few new versions for people to test.

VirtualBox was upgraded from version 5.0.24 in Beta 2 to version 5.1.4 and there were an enormous amount of fixes applied to this newer version, which was released in August.

KDE’s Plasma moved from its 5.7.95 beta version in Leap’s Beta 2 to version 5.8.0 in the Beta 3. Plasma 5.8 is new but the purpose of openSUSE Leap is to have well established packages and since Plasma 5.8 is a Long Term Support release, it made sense to have 5.8 in the distribution event though it is very new. Plasma 5.8 will be supported for 18 months, according to KDE’s release team. KDE Applications also have an update in the Beta 3 to version 16.08.1, which unifies the look of KDE and enhance the effects for users.

Firefox 49 was added to the Beta 3. Thunderbird’s has some security and edit fixes with version 45.3.0. Also in the new beta, YaST had storage and ruby updates and there was an installation fix for module crash in the newest yast2-installation 3.1.216 version.

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