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Find Out the Visa Requirements to Attend oSC18

January 29th, 2018 by

For people planning on attending the openSUSE Conference 2018 in Prague, Czech Republic, from May 25 – 27, there are certain requirements necessary to receive a visa for those who are not a citizen of a Schengen country.

It’s a good idea to start thinking about getting your visa and this post summarizes the requirements.

Please note: the Travel Support Program has no provisions to cover the cost of a visa, so it’s the travelers responsibility for covering the additional cost.

Alphabet Nation

You must apply for a Schengen visa through the Czech embassy or consulate in your country if you are from one of the following countries:


Ruby, YaST, Plasma 5.12 Beta Get Updates in Tumbleweed

January 26th, 2018 by

openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed received several snapshot of new software packages this past week.

A total of six snapshots arrived and brought new versions of Ruby, YaST, KDE’s Plasma 5.12 Beta and many others.

The latest snapshot, 20180124, switched the default for Ruby to version 2.5. Package improvements were made to the command line tool SUSEConnect 0.3.7. A change to cups-filters 1.19.0 in order to allow builds on systems without python2 was made with python3-cups rather than using python-cups. Enscript 1.6.6 fixed a handful of bugs and spec-cleaner 1.0.2 added groups for Rust and made the switch to pytest. Git, squid and perl-Encode also received minor updates in the snapshot.

The largest snapshot of the week was no doubt snapshot 20180122. The snapshot provided KDE Applications 17.12.1, Frameworks 5.42.0 and the beta version for KDE’s next  Long-Term-Support (LTS) release of Plasma 5.12. Tumbleweed users can tryout the new items in the 5.12 LTS like the new KDE Store, which brings a wide selection of addons. With the exception of updates to libgme, download manager uget and Oracle’s virtualbox, the release was primarily focused on the new versions from the KDE community. It is worth noting that virtualbox 5.2.6 fixed quite a few Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) and libgme 0.6.2 fixed crashes in nsfe emulator. Gamers should be happy.


openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week

January 22nd, 2018 by

The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26.

The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3.

“We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”

Leap 42.3 was released on July 26, 2017 and users were expected to upgrade from Leap 42.2 within 6 months of 42.3’s release.

Leap 42.2 was released in November of 2016. Its support life cycle of 42.2 has given users several months of maintenance.

The major release of the Leap 42 series has so far provided a support life cycle of 27 months and is expected to last until early 2019; when openSUSE Leap 42.3 will reach its EOL. That gives the major version of Leap 42 more than 36 months of life-cycle support. However, the EOL for the Leap 42 series is dependent on the release of the next major version, which will be openSUSE Leap 15 and it’s expected to be released later this Spring.

cPanel Provides Project with Network Cards

January 18th, 2018 by

The hosting platform cPanel has provided the openSUSE Project with two new network cards to assist the project with its infrastructure needs.

The network cards will soon be integrated into the openSUSE infrastructure to improve the Open Build Service.

“On behalf of the openSUSE Project and the many developers and packagers who use OBS to develop open-source software, we thank cPanel for their generosity,” said Richard Brown, openSUSE Chairman. “This contribution not only helps the openSUSE project but will help other open-source projects as well.”

OBS is a generic system to build and distribute binary packages from sources in an automatic, consistent and reproducible way. It can release packages as well as updates, add-ons, appliances and entire distributions for a wide range of operating systems and hardware architectures.

“We use an internal installation of the Open Build Service, and also help customers and third parties use the public OBS at build.opensuse.org,” said Ken Power, Vice President of Product Development at cPanel. “Supporting the open source projects that we use is incredibly important to us, and we’re glad to be able to help here.”

The network cards will be used to improve the backend of OBS.

“The cards will be used to connect the OBS backend storage and network; bringing it from a 1GB to 10BG and improving the backend performance,” said Thorsent Bro, a member of the openSUSE Heroes team. “We want to thank cPanel for its generous support and giving back to the projects that help with Linux/GNU development.”

Become a Google Summer of Code Mentor for openSUSE

January 15th, 2018 by

The  application period for organizations wanting to participate in the Google Summer of Code is now and the openSUSE project is once again looking for mentors who are willing to put forth projects to mentor GSoC students.

People interested in submitting a project for GSoC as part of an openSUSE mentors team can submit it to https://github.com/openSUSE/mentoring/issues. The submissions will be reflected on openSUSE 101 and submitted as part of a mentorship package to the official GSoC website.

“If you have a new project for this year, please open a new issue for each project immediately and label it accordingly,” said Christian Bruckmayer, an openSUSE mentor. “If you have a potential project, please email us ASAP.”

The deadline is Jan. 23 to submit the full package for GSoC, Bruckmayer said.

The full timeline of GSoC can found here at https://developers.google.com/open-source/gsoc/timeline.

GSoC is an international program that matches mentors and students and funded 1,315 student projects last year for 201 open source organizations. Last year, five students participated in GSoC under the openSUSE organizing team.

GSoC students, mentors and projects benefit from the active involvement of new mentors.  Many previous GSoC students later become mentors in the GSoC.

Email the mentors team at gsoc-mentors@opensuse.org.

openSUSE Conference Registration, Call For Papers Opens Today

January 11th, 2018 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2018 (oSC18), which takes place in Prague, Czech Republic, are open.

The dates for this year’s conference will be May 25 through May 27 at Faculty of Information Technologies of Czech Technical University in Prague. Submission for the call for papers will be open until April 20. There are 99 day from today to submit a proposal, but don’t wait until the late minute. Registration will be open from today until the day oSC18 begins; make sure to answer the survey question regarding the T-Shirt size.

Presentations can be submitted in one of the following formats:

  • Lightning Talks (15 mins)
  • Short Talks (30 mins)
  • Normal Talks (45 mins)
  • Long Workshop (3 hours)
  • Short Workshop (90 mins)

The tracks listed for the conference are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

While these tracks might be refined to better categorize or consolidate topics, people should submit proposals even if they don’t think it fits into one of the tracks.

A Program Committee will evaluate the proposals based on the submitted abstracts and the accepted proposals will be announced no later than April 21.

Volunteers who would like to participate on the Program Committee or the Organizing Team for the conference should email ddemaio (@) suse.de and phodac (@) suse.cz.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC18.

Hack Week Announced for Mid-November

October 9th, 2017 by

Hack Week 0x10 will be Nov. 10 – 16 at many of the SUSE Research and Development locations and developers and hackers from the community are welcomed to participate.

Hack Week is a week-long event where members of the openSUSE community, along with other communities, get a chance to investigate interesting technologies and get involved in promising new or existing projects.

The event focuses not only on building and expanding technology, but brings people with similar interests together to hack for fun. There are several successful stories that have come from previous Hack Weeks like  Jangouts, which is open-source video conferencing software.

The planning of the projects for Hack Week 0x10 can be created on http://hackweek.suse.com. Hackers who want to participate can also join existing projects. One example of a project that has already be created putting openSUSE on Chromebooks.

Visitors must be logged in to the website to create and join projects. To join the event at one of the locations, email hackweek@suse.de to be connected to a site manager at an SUSE R&D facility.

To learn more about Hack Week 0x10, visit https://hackweek.suse.com/about.

Tumbleweed Snapshots Pick Up Pace

June 8th, 2017 by

The care and thoroughness of making GNU Compiler Collection 7 the default compiler for openSUSE Tumbleweed produced a gradual decrease in snapshots over the past month, but it looks like snapshots of the rolling release are beginning to pick up the pace.

The four snapshots released this week aligns much to closer to upstream development and releases of GNOME, KDE, QEMU and Mesa top the list of this week’s new packages in Tumbleweed.

The newest snapshot, 20170605, saw a patch added for grub2 that fixed page fault exception when grub loads with NVIDIA cards and the libgcrypt 1.7.7 update made the noteworthy fix of a possible timing attack on EdDSA session key, which was previously patched. Nano 2.8.4 also improved PHP syntax highlighting in the snapshot.

Both Mozilla Thunderbird received changes to optimize and enhance compatibility with GCC 7 in the 20170604 snapshot with 64-bit. Expect 32-bit to come soon. QEMU 2.9.0 fixed several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) and improved support for several architectures and virtualization. Snapshot 20170604 also fixed some minor vulnerabilities like CVE-2017-9351 with Wireshark’s 2.2.7 version update and sudo 1.8.20 fixed CVE-2017-1000367.


GNU Health, openSUSE Pioneer Shift in Healthcare Management

March 13th, 2017 by

The GNU Health Project is one of many noble open-source projects and the openSUSE Project is pleased to announce it has donated 10 Raspberry Pis to help expand the use and development of the project on affordable ARM hardware.

GNU Health, which is a non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO), delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

“Running GNU Health  on an inexpensive computer like a Raspberry Pi really brings GNU Health’s vision of freedom and equity in health care closer to reality,” said Richard Brown, chairman of the openSUSE Project. “Think of the possibilities devices like these have to improve healthcare management and patient care using GNU Health.”

Raspberry Pis are full-blown computers with a huge potential for GNU Health and the industry, said Luis Falcón, founder of the GNU Health Project. For example, they can be used in real-time monitoring of vital signs in hospital settings and retrieving information from laboratory instruments for Personal Health Records at research and academic institutions.

“The fact that they come with openSUSE and GNUHealth pre-installed on Raspberry Pi, allows for fast deployment in many different contexts,” Falcón said, referring to the Raspberry Pi being put to field use.