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openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

November 8th, 2018 by

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the  openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

Sebastian Riedel and Stephan Kulow have been developing the project for two years and it has been used in production for more than a year and half. The Cavil legal review system replaces an older system and provides much more efficiency. Cavil can automatically accept more than 90 percent of all new requests based on data from previous reviews, so packages are much more streamlined into openSUSE Factory.

The project has been so efficient that two lawyers who do all the legal reviews with the system, which is also used by SUSE, had reviewed about 110,000 packages this past year. The same lawyers curated a library with 27.000 license patterns for 600 licenses and 20 license patterns for 100 of the  most common licenses that are used to create legal reports. Riedel said there is a desire hope to expand that in the future with the hope of collecting new patterns with the open-source community.

The legal Data Base used by SUSE to generate reports with new license patterns  is about 2TB and has about 68.433.436 pattern matches in 27.319.682 individual files.

Like openQA, Cavil is written in Perl, with Mojolicious/Minion and PostgreSQL.

A quick look at the statistics about the content of the legal database showed the most popular open source licenses were GPL-2.0, BSD-3-Clause, GPL-Unspecified and MIT respectively.

openSUSE Leap 15 Reaches Beta Phase Snapshots

January 31st, 2018 by

The development version of openSUSE Leap 15 has reached its beta phase builds and snapshots are available for testers via http://download.opensuse.org/distribution/leap/15.0/iso/.

Exactly like the rolling development model used to make openSUSE Leap 42.3, Leap 15.0 will use the same model until its final build. No concrete milestones will be used building up to the final release, which is expected in late Spring. As bugs are fixed and new packages introduced or excluded, snapshots of the latest beta phase builds will be released once they pass openQA testing; the first beta version build (Build 109.3) of openSUSE Leap 15 was recently released and there are currently two follow-on beta builds that would feature minor improvements if the beta builds pass openQA .

Announcements of new builds will be made on the opensuse-factory mailing list.

The beta Leap builds feature an all new fresh look, the Linux Long-Term-Support Kernel (LTS)  4.12* Kernel and users can test out KDE’s next LTS release of Plasma 5.12.

One bigger update remains to be integrated, wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel; that being rpm 4.14 that was released in openSUSE Tumbleweed just two weeks ago.

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Factory moves to Rolling Release Development Model

July 29th, 2014 by

We are proud to announce that we have just switched our beloved development distribution, openSUSE Factory, to be an independent distribution using the “rolling release” development model. openSUSE Factory is now a tested, reliable and bleeding edge Linux distribution! This change will shorten the stabilization process for our major releases (next up: 13.2) and eliminate the need for pre-releases and milestones.

A more distributed development process for openSUSE

In the old development model, an army of packagers would shoot new packages and updates to Factory, with a relatively small team of Factory Maintainers taking care of the integration process of all those packages. This often took a long time to stabilize for a release.

In the new “rolling release” development model, package submissions cannot go to Factory directly. First they have to prove to be functional and trustworthy in a staging project. Staging projects are projects in our Open Build Service where groups of submissions are collected, reviewed, compiled and tested with openQA. But even after the packages survived the staging project, they don’t directly end up in Factory. First all Factory media (e.g. DVDs etc.) are being built and put again through more tests in openQA. The Factory maintainers then decide on the basis of the Factory-To-Test overview if the new packages should be published to the users.

New Factory Workflow

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A new milestone on the cloud: openSUSE releases milestone 3

July 22nd, 2011 by

openSUSE Milestone 3Just a few days ago the third of six milestones on the road to openSUSE 12.1 has been made available for testing before it goes to final release November 11th, 2011.  (Yes, 11-11-11!)

Main changes to this milestone

The third milestone has a huge number of changes and improvements on top of the latest openSUSE release. And many packages have been updated or upgraded. You can check the latest package versions on this page. What are the major changes?

  • Firefox 5
  • MozillaThunderbird 5.0
  • aaa_base 12.1
  • Kernel 3.0 rc7
  • Python3   3.2
  • Sysstat 10.0.1
  • LibreOffice 3.3.3.1
  • Tomboy 1.7.1
  • Tracker 0.11.0
  • many smaller updates to KDE and GNOME applications and desktops

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Blast the bugs out of YaST on April 25: Operation YaST Smash

April 21st, 2008 by

The openSUSE Project is going Bug Smashing on April 25, and we want you to join us! We’re looking for openSUSE users and contributors who have some time to help triage YaST bugs and clean up Bugzilla.

Join us on #openSUSE-Factory from 09:00 to 18:00 CEST. We’ll be going through the Bugzilla and reviewing YaST bugs to see which bugs are still valid, gathering information about existing bugs, and generally paring down the bug count to help developers focus on the most crucial problems.

Anyone can participate — you don’t have to be a developer or power user to join in, just point your browser at the openSUSE Bugzilla, log in (be sure to create an account if you don’t have one already) and start searching for bugs against YaST. Help verify bugs that are in Bugzilla, and help close bugs that have already been fixed.

Our goal for Friday is to get the YaST bug count in Bugzilla down and clear the field for YaST developers to concentrate on real bugs that need to be smashed for the openSUSE 11.0 release. You can see the current open bugs here.

Why do we do Bug Smashing days? We want to do a couple of things. First, we want to help to train new contributors who haven’t done bug reporting and triage before. By holding a Bug Smashing Day we can be ready to answer questions and provide support for new bug smashers in real time.

Second, we want to focus our attention on a specific application or feature. In this case, we want to focus on YaST and help clean up the bug database so the YaST team can concentrate on the real problems.

What do you need to participate? Just a Bugzilla account, a system with a relevant release of openSUSE, and be signed in to #openSUSE-Factory.

Can’t participate in the Bug Smashing days? No problem. We encourage Bugzilla cleanup all year round! See the page on submitting bug reports, and join us on #opensuse-factory on Freenode.

Have questions about Bug Smashing? See the Bug Reporting FAQ. If your question still isn’t answered, send a note to Christoph Thiel or Joe ‘Zonker’ Brockmeier.