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GSoC 2018 Mentor Summit

October 27th, 2018 by

David Kang and I attended two weeks ago (12-14 Oct) the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) Mentor Summit in California representing openSUSE. :sunny: Here is our report of the conference.

It was an incredibly well organized event with a busy schedule. It was our first summit (we try that different openSUSE mentors/org admins go every year) and we enjoyed it a lot and found it really useful. Apart from attending many sessions about open source, mentoring and GSoC, we had the opportunity to meet and have interesting conversations with other org admins and mentors, as well as with the Google open source team and other Googlers. In total 314 mentors and org admins from 42 countries attended the events. This was a great chance to collect chocolate from all around the world for the chocolate bar table, which has already become a tradition at the summit. :chocolate_bar:

chocolate table David and Ana in San Francisco

The summit follows the unconference format, which means that the sessions are decided and organized by the attendees. Those are the most outstanding sessions from the ones David and I attended.

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GSoC Half Way Through

July 20th, 2018 by

As you may already know, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. Our students started working already two months ago. Ankush, Liana and Matheus have passed the two evaluations successfully and they are busy hacking to finish their projects. Go on reading to find out what they have to say about their experience, their projects and the missing work for the few more weeks. 😀

Ankush Malik

Ankush is improving people collaboration in the Hackweek tool and he has already made many great contributions like the emoticons, similar project section and notifications features. In fact, the Hackweek 17 was just last week, so in the last days a lot of people have already been using these great new features. There were a lot of good comments about his work! :cupid: and we also received a lot of feedback, as you can for example see in the issues list.

But even more important than all the functionality, is all Ankush is learning while coding and working with his mentors and the openSUSE community, such as working with AJAX in Ruby on Rails, good coding practices and better coding style.

The last part of his project will include some more new features. If you want to find out more about his project and the challenges that Ankush expects to have, read his interesting blog post:

https://medium.com/@ankushmalik631/how-my-gsoc-project-is-going-4942614132a2

Hackweek tool screenshot

Xu Liana

Liana is working on integrating Cloud Pinyin (the most popular input method in China) on ibus-libpinyin. For her, GSoC is being an enjoyable learning process full of challenges. With the help of her mentors she has learnt about autotools and she builds now her code without graphical build tools. 💪 For the few more weeks, she plans to learn about algorithmics that are useful for the project and, after finish the coding part, she would like to go deeper in the fundamentals of compiling. Read it from her owns word in her blog post:

https://liana.hillwoodhome.net/2018/07/14/the-first-half-of-the-project-during-gsoc-libpinyin

Matheus de Sousa Bernardo

Matheus is working in Trollolo, a cli-tool which helps teams using Trello to organize their work. He has been mainly focused on the restructuring of commands and the incomplete backup feature. The discussion with his mentors made him take different implementation paths than the ones he had in mind at the beginning, learning the importance of keeping things simple. It has been complicated for Matheus to find time for both the GSoC project and his university duties. But he still has some more weeks to implement the more challenging feature, the automation of Trollolo! 💥

Check his blog post with more details about the project: https://matheussbernardo.me/gsoc/2018/07/08/midterm

 

I hope you enjoyed reading about the work and experiences of the openSUSE students and mentors. Keep tuned as there are still some more hacking weeks and the students will write a last blog post summarizing their GSoC experience. 😉

 


This blog post original version can be found at http://anamaria.martinezgomez.name/2018/09/05/opensuse-asia-summit.html This blog post’s content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

GSoC Blog: openSUSE Conference 2018

June 6th, 2018 by

Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Matheus de Sousa Bernardo. Matheus is assisting with improving API and workflow of Trollolo, which is a cli-tool that helps teams using Trello to organize their work, as part of his Google Summer of Code project.

GSoC students are already hacking!

May 23rd, 2018 by

We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)

 

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University students, openSUSE participates in GSoC!

February 19th, 2018 by

openSUSE participates again in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. :sunny: With this article, I will provide my experience as a former GSoC student and mentor, give you more details about the program and try to encourage students to get involved in openSUSE development through GSoC.

Why open source and openSUSE?

First of all, you may wonder why you should want to get involved in open source development. Everybody has their own reasons, but for me there are three main ones:

  • I have fun: The most important reason is that it is fun. At openSUSE, we have great conferences, geekos everywhere, geeko cookies, openSUSE beer, fun stickers,… and the most important part: we have fun when working!
  • I learn a lot: In most of the projects, every single line of code is reviewed. That means not only that the code quality is better, but also that every time you write something wrong or that can be improved, someone will tell you. In open source, we think that making mistakes is perfectly fine. That people correct you is the best way to learn.
  • People: I have the chance to work with really skilled people all around the world, who are interested in the same things as me.

Why GSoC?

Starting is always difficult, but you don’t have to do it alone! In openSUSE, you will always find people to help you, and with GSoC this is even easier. The best feature of the program is that you will always have at least one mentor (most likely two) who will lead you through it. In addition, you will work in a project used in the real world by many users and all your code will be released under an open source license, so everybody can access, use, study, change and share it. Last, you will receive a stipend between 2,400 and 6,600 dollars depending on the country.

Projects

At openSUSE, you can find projects written in Ruby on RailsPerlRubyHTML/JavaScriptC/C++ and much more. This year you can work during GSoC in some of the most central and biggest projects in openSUSE: Open Build ServiceopenQA and YaST. They will for sure be challenging projects to work in, but don’t get scared, as that means that you will learn a lot from it too. And remember that your mentors and other openSUSE contributors will be there to help you!

But we also have simpler projects such as Trollolo, where any computer science university student could get started with Ruby. The desire to learn is much more important than the previous experience and knowledge.

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Project Selected as Mentoring Organization for Google Summer of Code

February 14th, 2018 by


Let the fun begin! This week it was announced that the
openSUSE Project is one of the 212 mentoring organization for this year’s Google Summer of Code, which is an annual international program that awards stipends to university students to write code and learn about open source development during their summer break.

The openSUSE Project has participated in GSoC since 2006 and has helped more than 50 students get started with free software development.

As a mentoring organization, eligible students will have an opportunity between March 12 – 27 to submit a project proposal to the GSoC program site. The program is open to university students aged 18 or over.

The openSUSE website dedicated to GSoC offers nine projects that GSoC students can select from to use for their proposals. The topics focus on web development, quality assurance, packaging and user experience design. The technologies used in the project are Ruby on Rails, Perl, Ruby, Html/JavaScript and C/C++. (more…)

Become a Google Summer of Code Mentor for openSUSE

January 15th, 2018 by

The  application period for organizations wanting to participate in the Google Summer of Code is now and the openSUSE project is once again looking for mentors who are willing to put forth projects to mentor GSoC students.

People interested in submitting a project for GSoC as part of an openSUSE mentors team can submit it to https://github.com/openSUSE/mentoring/issues. The submissions will be reflected on openSUSE 101 and submitted as part of a mentorship package to the official GSoC website.

“If you have a new project for this year, please open a new issue for each project immediately and label it accordingly,” said Christian Bruckmayer, an openSUSE mentor. “If you have a potential project, please email us ASAP.”

The deadline is Jan. 23 to submit the full package for GSoC, Bruckmayer said.

The full timeline of GSoC can found here at https://developers.google.com/open-source/gsoc/timeline.

GSoC is an international program that matches mentors and students and funded 1,315 student projects last year for 201 open source organizations. Last year, five students participated in GSoC under the openSUSE organizing team.

GSoC students, mentors and projects benefit from the active involvement of new mentors.  Many previous GSoC students later become mentors in the GSoC.

Email the mentors team at gsoc-mentors@opensuse.org.

Google Summer of Code Mid-Term

July 19th, 2016 by

In this years edition of Google Summer of Code, an international annual program in which stipends are awarded to students to hack on Free Software during the summer, openSUSE members are mentoring seven students who all passed their mid-term evaluation last week. Go on to read what they have to say about their first 10 weeks in the program.

Ana María Martínez Gómez

This year, we have three students working on the Open Source Event Manager (OSEM), which is a Ruby on Rails application that is used to organize openSUSE conferences. One of these three students is Ana Maria from Madrid. Her project is to improve the conference schedule to make it more functional and mobile friendly. In her midterm blog post, she shows and explains how she reimplemented the schedule within a bootstrap carousel.

new-schedule-tablet

She also worked on a talks overview page and several smaller issues. For instance, several openSUSE Conference visitors this year reported that it would be nice to open the schedule with the current date selected, which Ana already implemented. One of the most important parts of Google Summer of Code is to teach the students open source and technical skills like Ana writes:
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First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code

May 30th, 2016 by

Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.

Hour of Code reinforces need for project mentors

December 8th, 2014 by

Administrators, mentors needed for Google Summer of Code

In the words of will.i.am, “great coders are today’s rock stars,” but unfortunately there are not enough of these rock stars in the world to fulfill the demand.

Since this week is the Hour of Code, it’s a good time emphasize the need for the Open Source Software community to participate in outreach programs.

Besides doing what you can to participate in this weeks Hour of Code, its important to point out the need to have administrators and mentors from openSUSE’s community for the annual Google Summer of Code.

Google Summer of Code, which openSUSE has participatied in for several years, offers post-secondary student developers a stipends to write code for various open source software projects. Students are matched with a mentoring organization like openSUSE and given projects to work on over a three-month period. Last year there were 1,300 students with 190 mentoring organizations that took part in the program. Administrators get the process started and mentors help future developers understand real-world software development scenarios.

Administrators start the GSOC process and submit proposals for the mentoring organization by filling out some forms. Administrators submit the application to Google between Feb. 9 and Feb. 20. Project ideas are discussed with potential mentoring organization and mentors are paired with students in the spring.

To participate in this project, visit our GSOC portal or learn more at GSOC.

Learn more about the Hour of Code campaign.