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Posts Tagged ‘Kubernetes’

LibreOffice, Firefox, Curl Receive Updates in Tumbleweed

January 15th, 2020 by

Several packages were updated this week for openSUSE Tumbleweed as was expected after the holiday season. Five snapshots of the rolling release have been delivered so far this week after passing the rigorous testing applied by openQA.

The releases are trending incredibly stable with trending or recorded ratings abovea 96 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The most recent snapshot, 20200112, updated Xfce desktop environment with an update for xfce4-session 4.14.1 and xfce4-settings 4.14.2. Various developer visible changes were made with Google’s 20200101 re2 library for regular expressions updates. GNOME’s application for managing images with a users Flickr account, frogr 1.6, removed the deprecated use of GTimeVal. The open source platform for the scale-out of public and private cloud storage, glusterfs 7.1, fixed storage rebalancing caused by an input error and fixed a memory leak in the glusterfsd process. ImageMagick version 7.0.9.14 optimized the special effects performance of Fx and virglrenderer 0.8.1, which is a project to investigate the possibility of creating a virtual 3D GPU for use inside qemu virtual machines to accelerate 3D rendering, added some patches. The snapshot continued to update packages for KDE Applications 19.12.1 that started in the 20200111 snapshot. Improvements to the scroll wheel speed was made for KDE’s Dolphin, the video editing software Kdenlive had multiple fixes and an adjustment for faster rendering, and obsolete code was removed from Applications’ diagram package umbrello. Most of the KDE Applications packages also updated the Copyright year to 2020.

In addition to the  KDE Applications 19.12.1 packages that began arriving in snapshot 20200111, KDE’s Plasma 5.17.5 also arrived in the snapshot. The updated Plasma fixed a regression in the “Port the pager applet away from QtWidgets” and fixed the drag from Dolphin to a virtual desktop switcher widget. The Plasma NetworkManager also had a fix for a crash when changing advanced IPv4 configurations. The much-anticipated fix for the security vulnerability in Firefox was made with the Mozilla update to Firefox 72.0.1; there were eight Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) fixes in the update from the previous 71 version included in Tumbleweed, but the 72.0.1 fixed the bug that hackers could use to access a computer of anyone using the browser because of incorrect alias information in the IonMonkey JIT compiler. LibreOffice 6.4.0.1 added a patch to fix a button that allowed the wrong ordering of a Qt interface and curl 7.68.0 had a lengthy amount of fixes and changes to include adding a BearSSL vtls implementation for the Transport Layer Security (TLS). openSUSE’s snapper 0.8.8 version had a rewrite of a subpackage from Python to C++ and several YaST packages were updated, which included the fixing of an error during an upgrade if /var/lib/YaST2 was missing when using Btrfs.

Troubleshooting tool sysdig was updated in snapshot 20200110; it fixed a memory leak as well as updated the use of Kubernetes APIs to support version 1.16.vMany GNOME packages were updated to version 3.34.3 and the fwupd 1.3.6 package for updating firmware added a new plugin for working with embedded MultiMediaCard (eMMC) devices. A drop of python3-setuptools dependencies from rpm-build was made with the update of rpm 4.15.1 and Optimized Inner Loop Runtime Compiler (orc) 0.4.31 fixed various PowerPC issues.

Snapshots 20200109 and 20200108 had a minimal amount of package updates, but the Linux Kernel was updated to version 5.4.7 in the 20200108, which provided a large amount of updates from the previous 5.3.12 kernel Tumbleweed was running. Updates for Btrfs in the kernel were plentiful and there were about a handful of fixes in the kernel for IBM’s s390 and for the file system ext4.

Kubic is now a certified Kubernetes distribution

January 24th, 2019 by

Published by Richard Brown on Jan 22, 2019 on kubic.opensuse.org

Certified Kubernetes

The openSUSE Kubic team is proud to announce that as of yesterday, our Kubic distribution has become a Certified Kubernetes Distribution! Notably, it is the first open source Kubernetes distribution to be certified using the CRI-O container runtime!

What is Kubernetes Certification?

Container technologies in general, and Kubernetes in particular, are becoming increasingly common and widely adopted by enthusiasts, developers, and companies across the globe. A large ecosystem of software and solutions is evolving around these technologies. More and more developers are thinking “Cloud Native” and producing their software in containers first, often targeting Kubernetes as their intended platform for orchestrating those containers. And put bluntly, they want their software to work.

But Kubernetes isn’t like some other software with this sort of broad adoption. Even though it’s being used in scenarios large and small, from small developer labs to large production infrastructure systems, Kubernetes is still a fast-moving project, with new versions appearing very often and a support lifespan shorter than other similar projects. This presents real challenges for people who want to download, deploy and run Kubernetes clusters and know they can run the things they want on top of it.

When you consider the fast moving codebase and the diverse range of solutions providing or integrating with Kubernetes, that is a lot of moving parts provided by a lot of people. That can feel risky to some people, and lead to doubt that something built for Kubernetes today might not work tomorrow.

Thankfully, this a problem the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is tackling. The CNCF helps to build a community around open source container software, and established the Kubernetes Software Conformance Certification to further that goal. Certified Kubernetes solutions are validated by the CNCF. They check that versions, APIs, and such are all correct, present, and working as expected so users and developers can be assured their Kubernetes-based solutions will work with ease, now and into the future.

 

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openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

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GSoC Blog: openSUSE Conference 2018

June 6th, 2018 by

Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Matheus de Sousa Bernardo. Matheus is assisting with improving API and workflow of Trollolo, which is a cli-tool that helps teams using Trello to organize their work, as part of his Google Summer of Code project.

Introducing Kubic Project: a new open-source project

May 29th, 2017 by

Recent years have seen tremendous growth in the container technologies market. From being a non-existent category just a few years ago to being one of the most interesting, fast development and exciting areas.

Containers change the way we think about application architecture and the speed at which we can deliver on business requirements. They provide consistency and portability across environments and allow developers to focus on building a great product, without the distraction of underlying execution details.

Today the entire application delivery supply chain is changing as the age of abstract application creation is upon us. This change is fueled by the adoption of a few key technologies,  including shared code repositories, continuous integration, continuous development, and cloud computing.  However, the ultimate driver of this movement is a software delivery mechanism: containers.

Project Kubic is a generic project for the many new initiatives related to re-designing the operating system around principles of immutable infrastructure and the usage of a stack based on Linux, docker project and Kubernetes.  The primary building block of the Kubic Project is the Container Host OS based on openSUSE Tumbleweed.

In the near future and with your support, we’ll be enabling Kubernetes and many other new features. This will allow you to easily build Container as a Service (CaaS) solutions and run them everywhere…

How can the Kubic Project help me?

  •  Traditional OS are cool and fun to hack on, but the model with a single runtime environment controlled by the OS and shared by all applications does not meet the requirements of modern application-centric IT.
  • Based on a monolithic approach, the traditional OS brings lots of challenges for managing the stacks running on top of it. With Kubic, we would like to rethink the OS by redesigning it for modern IT applications.
  • In agile environments, developers and DevOps engineers are taking responsibilities over their app and seeking control over the runtime underneath their applications, without necessarily owning the entire stack.
  • VMs provide a means for separation among applications, but this model adds resource and management overhead.

Join our Kubic Project and together we will build the next generation of Container OS

Useful information:

(This blog is written by Simona Arsene and was originally published at https://www.suse.com/communities/blog/introducing-kubic-project-new-open-source-project/)

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