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GSoC students are already hacking!

May 23rd, 2018 by

We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)

 

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University students, openSUSE participates in GSoC!

February 19th, 2018 by

openSUSE participates again in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. :sunny: With this article, I will provide my experience as a former GSoC student and mentor, give you more details about the program and try to encourage students to get involved in openSUSE development through GSoC.

Why open source and openSUSE?

First of all, you may wonder why you should want to get involved in open source development. Everybody has their own reasons, but for me there are three main ones:

  • I have fun: The most important reason is that it is fun. At openSUSE, we have great conferences, geekos everywhere, geeko cookies, openSUSE beer, fun stickers,… and the most important part: we have fun when working!
  • I learn a lot: In most of the projects, every single line of code is reviewed. That means not only that the code quality is better, but also that every time you write something wrong or that can be improved, someone will tell you. In open source, we think that making mistakes is perfectly fine. That people correct you is the best way to learn.
  • People: I have the chance to work with really skilled people all around the world, who are interested in the same things as me.

Why GSoC?

Starting is always difficult, but you don’t have to do it alone! In openSUSE, you will always find people to help you, and with GSoC this is even easier. The best feature of the program is that you will always have at least one mentor (most likely two) who will lead you through it. In addition, you will work in a project used in the real world by many users and all your code will be released under an open source license, so everybody can access, use, study, change and share it. Last, you will receive a stipend between 2,400 and 6,600 dollars depending on the country.

Projects

At openSUSE, you can find projects written in Ruby on RailsPerlRubyHTML/JavaScriptC/C++ and much more. This year you can work during GSoC in some of the most central and biggest projects in openSUSE: Open Build ServiceopenQA and YaST. They will for sure be challenging projects to work in, but don’t get scared, as that means that you will learn a lot from it too. And remember that your mentors and other openSUSE contributors will be there to help you!

But we also have simpler projects such as Trollolo, where any computer science university student could get started with Ruby. The desire to learn is much more important than the previous experience and knowledge.

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Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

February 8th, 2018 by

This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

The Wayland session has already been tested by openQA as part of the Tumbleweed release process as was mentioned in a previous news post, but now this is also done for live media. So, if you want to test Wayland without touching your existing installation, why not give the live media a try?

As always, have a lot of fun!

openSUSE Leap 15 Reaches Beta Phase Snapshots

January 31st, 2018 by

The development version of openSUSE Leap 15 has reached its beta phase builds and snapshots are available for testers via http://download.opensuse.org/distribution/leap/15.0/iso/.

Exactly like the rolling development model used to make openSUSE Leap 42.3, Leap 15.0 will use the same model until its final build. No concrete milestones will be used building up to the final release, which is expected in late Spring. As bugs are fixed and new packages introduced or excluded, snapshots of the latest beta phase builds will be released once they pass openQA testing; the first beta version build (Build 109.3) of openSUSE Leap 15 was recently released and there are currently two follow-on beta builds that would feature minor improvements if the beta builds pass openQA .

Announcements of new builds will be made on the opensuse-factory mailing list.

The beta Leap builds feature an all new fresh look, the Linux Long-Term-Support Kernel (LTS)  4.12* Kernel and users can test out KDE’s next LTS release of Plasma 5.12.

One bigger update remains to be integrated, wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel; that being rpm 4.14 that was released in openSUSE Tumbleweed just two weeks ago.

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GStreamer, Mesa Packages Updated in Tumbleweed

June 29th, 2017 by

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought a few major release packages and a clear example for how the automated testing tool openQA  can prevents a snapshot from being released.

The unicode character map Gucharmap, which uses the gtk+ toolkit and runs on any platform that gtk+ supports, was updated to version 10.0.0 in the repositories in the 20170625 snapshot. The GNOME project updated translations and support of editors like Bluefish as well as many others. Other major release were also in the 20170625 snapshot. An update of net-tools to version 2.0 dropped the network statistics (netstat) Extended Internet Daemon (xinetd) service to phase out xinetd. Users of the proc file-system get cgroup namespaces with the arrival of the psmisc 23.0 package.

Some minor version updates in the 20170625 snapshot were made to kexec-tools 2.0.14, which had backport upstream with fixes, and drbd 9.0.8, which is a block device which is designed to build high availability clusters, merged some changes preparing for compatibility with the Linux Kernel 4.12. Yast2-bootloader made some changes to autoYaST configurations in version 3.3.0.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Users New Vulkan, 4.9.7 Kernel

February 9th, 2017 by

Six Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought users newer versions of GStreamer, Wine, Vulkan, and a new Linux Kernel.

The new 4.9.7 kernel arrived over the weekend with the 20170204 snapshot.

The new kernel sources updated config files and fixed a build failure specific to DWARF (Debugging with Attributed Records Format). The snapshot added support for the Perl client ddclient to version 3.8.3 and yast2-installation 3.2.20 added an all-in-one installation overview for SUSE’s new Container as a Service Platform product. More information about CaaSP and transactional updates can be found in a video presented by Thorsten Kukuk at FOSDEM.

GNU Compiler Collection 6.3.1 passed testing in openQA and made it into the 20170205 snapshot and so did python-cryptography 1.7.2 and getdata 0.10.0, which is a library that provides an Application Programming Interface (API) to interface with Dirfile databases.

The 20170206 snapshot gave users Wine 2.1, which provided fixes that were deferred during the code freeze and Direct2D rendering improvements. Mercurial 4.1 reduced server-side PCU usage with a new compression engine.

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Factory moves to Rolling Release Development Model

July 29th, 2014 by

We are proud to announce that we have just switched our beloved development distribution, openSUSE Factory, to be an independent distribution using the “rolling release” development model. openSUSE Factory is now a tested, reliable and bleeding edge Linux distribution! This change will shorten the stabilization process for our major releases (next up: 13.2) and eliminate the need for pre-releases and milestones.

A more distributed development process for openSUSE

In the old development model, an army of packagers would shoot new packages and updates to Factory, with a relatively small team of Factory Maintainers taking care of the integration process of all those packages. This often took a long time to stabilize for a release.

In the new “rolling release” development model, package submissions cannot go to Factory directly. First they have to prove to be functional and trustworthy in a staging project. Staging projects are projects in our Open Build Service where groups of submissions are collected, reviewed, compiled and tested with openQA. But even after the packages survived the staging project, they don’t directly end up in Factory. First all Factory media (e.g. DVDs etc.) are being built and put again through more tests in openQA. The Factory maintainers then decide on the basis of the Factory-To-Test overview if the new packages should be published to the users.

New Factory Workflow

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openSUSE Announces First Public Release of openQA

October 11th, 2011 by

The openSUSE Project announces the 1.0 release of the unique cross-distribution-capable, fully automated testing framework openQA. openQA is the only comprehensive testing tool which can run tests on every level of the OS, from core functionality like the bootloader and booting the kernel up to testing applications like Firefox and LibreOffice. It shows the results in a convenient web interface and allows testers to see screenshots and even videos of the issues found. openQA is used to run nightly tests of the ‘Factory’ development repository for the upcoming openSUSE 12.1 release. openQA is available under the GPL version 2 or later.
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