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LibreOffice, Firefox, Curl Receive Updates in Tumbleweed

January 15th, 2020 by

Several packages were updated this week for openSUSE Tumbleweed as was expected after the holiday season. Five snapshots of the rolling release have been delivered so far this week after passing the rigorous testing applied by openQA.

The releases are trending incredibly stable with trending or recorded ratings abovea 96 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The most recent snapshot, 20200112, updated Xfce desktop environment with an update for xfce4-session 4.14.1 and xfce4-settings 4.14.2. Various developer visible changes were made with Google’s 20200101 re2 library for regular expressions updates. GNOME’s application for managing images with a users Flickr account, frogr 1.6, removed the deprecated use of GTimeVal. The open source platform for the scale-out of public and private cloud storage, glusterfs 7.1, fixed storage rebalancing caused by an input error and fixed a memory leak in the glusterfsd process. ImageMagick version 7.0.9.14 optimized the special effects performance of Fx and virglrenderer 0.8.1, which is a project to investigate the possibility of creating a virtual 3D GPU for use inside qemu virtual machines to accelerate 3D rendering, added some patches. The snapshot continued to update packages for KDE Applications 19.12.1 that started in the 20200111 snapshot. Improvements to the scroll wheel speed was made for KDE’s Dolphin, the video editing software Kdenlive had multiple fixes and an adjustment for faster rendering, and obsolete code was removed from Applications’ diagram package umbrello. Most of the KDE Applications packages also updated the Copyright year to 2020.

In addition to the  KDE Applications 19.12.1 packages that began arriving in snapshot 20200111, KDE’s Plasma 5.17.5 also arrived in the snapshot. The updated Plasma fixed a regression in the “Port the pager applet away from QtWidgets” and fixed the drag from Dolphin to a virtual desktop switcher widget. The Plasma NetworkManager also had a fix for a crash when changing advanced IPv4 configurations. The much-anticipated fix for the security vulnerability in Firefox was made with the Mozilla update to Firefox 72.0.1; there were eight Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) fixes in the update from the previous 71 version included in Tumbleweed, but the 72.0.1 fixed the bug that hackers could use to access a computer of anyone using the browser because of incorrect alias information in the IonMonkey JIT compiler. LibreOffice 6.4.0.1 added a patch to fix a button that allowed the wrong ordering of a Qt interface and curl 7.68.0 had a lengthy amount of fixes and changes to include adding a BearSSL vtls implementation for the Transport Layer Security (TLS). openSUSE’s snapper 0.8.8 version had a rewrite of a subpackage from Python to C++ and several YaST packages were updated, which included the fixing of an error during an upgrade if /var/lib/YaST2 was missing when using Btrfs.

Troubleshooting tool sysdig was updated in snapshot 20200110; it fixed a memory leak as well as updated the use of Kubernetes APIs to support version 1.16.vMany GNOME packages were updated to version 3.34.3 and the fwupd 1.3.6 package for updating firmware added a new plugin for working with embedded MultiMediaCard (eMMC) devices. A drop of python3-setuptools dependencies from rpm-build was made with the update of rpm 4.15.1 and Optimized Inner Loop Runtime Compiler (orc) 0.4.31 fixed various PowerPC issues.

Snapshots 20200109 and 20200108 had a minimal amount of package updates, but the Linux Kernel was updated to version 5.4.7 in the 20200108, which provided a large amount of updates from the previous 5.3.12 kernel Tumbleweed was running. Updates for Btrfs in the kernel were plentiful and there were about a handful of fixes in the kernel for IBM’s s390 and for the file system ext4.

KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.17, Qt 5.14 and more

October 10th, 2019 by

It’s been way too long since the last blog post, so we’ve got quite a lot to report on!

Plasma 5.17 Beta

The Beta version of Plasma 5.17 was released with many new features and improvements such as per-screen fractional scaling on Wayland, a new User Interface (UI) for configuring permissions of Thunderbolt devices and network statistics in KSysGuard. The latter requires some more privileges than usual for a user application, so is currently being looked at by the SUSE security team.

openQA found a few bugs already, like GIMP looking more “colorful” than usual and some applications mixing Kirigami and Qt Widgets breaking some keyboard shortcuts. Both of those were addressed meanwhile and will be fixed in the final release of 5.17.

If you haven’t tested the Plasma 5.17 Beta yet, there’s still some time left! If you come across a problem in the software, please head over to the KDE bug tracker; if instead you find an issue that is openSUSE specific, go over to the openSUSE bugzilla.

To get it on your Leap or Tumbleweed installation, you can read https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:KDE_repositories.

In case you face some severe issues, the automatic snapshotting of the root filesystem using btrfs has your back and you can simply go back to the working state by booting into an older snapshot and doing a rollback.

Argon, an installable live medium that includes Leap 15.1 with the Beta and doesn’t require any manual repository addition, is also available.

openSUSE Leap 15.2

Like it happened for Leap 42.2, 15.2 will also see major version upgrades of many components.

Next to a new version of the Linux kernel, it’s planned to ship with Qt 5.12 LTS, Plasma 5.18 (of course also LTS) and the latest KDE Frameworks and Applications, which we can get in early enough for proper testing to ensure the best user experience possible!

This means that the “Full Wayland” session that landed in Tumbleweed a few weeks ago will also be available in Leap 15.2 and support per-screen fractional scaling.

As the target versions of Applications, Frameworks and Plasma aren’t even out yet, we’re currently integrating Qt 5.12 LTS with the latest packages from Factory.

Qt 5.14

Users of Tumbleweed and Leap with newer KDE software are used to having the latest available features and bugfixes, which is only possible by keeping up with Qt development and acting proactively.

So while the 5.14 branch of Qt is still young, we’re already busy integrating it into our builds. During the initial packaging of the 5.14 Alpha some bugs (QTBUG-78867, QTBUG-78881, QTBUG-78911, QTBUG-78948) were already identified and most of them fixed by now, so the KDE:Qt:5.14 project is built and usable by now. To develop against Qt 5.14 and test your applications with it, you can add the repo and get started.

So far it’s still in the phase of integration and getting everything in shape to build against it, but soon we’ll submit it to the Factory staging area to see how it behaves in there.

One of the most user visible features is that the implementation for scaling (for HiDPI displays) was mostly rewritten. Other noteworthy changes are the addition of various backends for hardware acceleration of Qt Quick using a new abstraction layer (opt-in), which can now also take advantage of Vulkan and introduction of a new “qtquicktimeline” module, which allows for easier integration of timeline-driven animations into Qt Quick.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Bali: Call for proposals is Open

May 1st, 2019 by

The openSUSE.Asia Committee call for proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 is now open.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun.  Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

Following the Asia Summit in Taipei last year, the sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit year 2019 will be at Udayana University, Bali Indonesia on October 5th and 6th, 2019. The past Asia Summits have had participants from Indonesia, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, India, Nepal, and etc.

Call for proposals

The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP). Even if you live away from Bali, please consider applying for the event.

Topics

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will invite talks/workshop relevant to openSUSE and other topics like Cloud, Virtualization, Container, Container Orchestration, Linux desktop environments and applications since openSUSE is a collection of various FLOSS products. The examples of the topics (not limited to) are as the following:

  • openSUSE (including Leap, Tumbleweed, Open Build Services, OpenQA, YaST)
  • openSUSE Kubic, Cloud, Virtualization, Container, and Container Orchestration
  • Embedded and IoT
  • Linux kernel and file system
  • Security (Access/Integrity control, Cryptography, Vulnerability management)
  • Desktop environments and applications (e.g. GNOME, KDE, XFCE)
  • Office suite, graphic art, multimedia (e.g. LibreOffice, Calligra, GIMP, Inkscape)
  • Multilingualization support (e.g. input methods, translation)
  • Other software running on openSUSE

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openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

November 8th, 2018 by

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the  openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

Sebastian Riedel and Stephan Kulow have been developing the project for two years and it has been used in production for more than a year and half. The Cavil legal review system replaces an older system and provides much more efficiency. Cavil can automatically accept more than 90 percent of all new requests based on data from previous reviews, so packages are much more streamlined into openSUSE Factory.

The project has been so efficient that two lawyers who do all the legal reviews with the system, which is also used by SUSE, had reviewed about 110,000 packages this past year. The same lawyers curated a library with 27.000 license patterns for 600 licenses and 20 license patterns for 100 of the  most common licenses that are used to create legal reports. Riedel said there is a desire hope to expand that in the future with the hope of collecting new patterns with the open-source community.

The legal Data Base used by SUSE to generate reports with new license patterns  is about 2TB and has about 68.433.436 pattern matches in 27.319.682 individual files.

Like openQA, Cavil is written in Perl, with Mojolicious/Minion and PostgreSQL.

A quick look at the statistics about the content of the legal database showed the most popular open source licenses were GPL-2.0, BSD-3-Clause, GPL-Unspecified and MIT respectively.

GSoC students are already hacking!

May 23rd, 2018 by

We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)

 

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University students, openSUSE participates in GSoC!

February 19th, 2018 by

openSUSE participates again in Google Summer of Code (GSoC), a program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. :sunny: With this article, I will provide my experience as a former GSoC student and mentor, give you more details about the program and try to encourage students to get involved in openSUSE development through GSoC.

Why open source and openSUSE?

First of all, you may wonder why you should want to get involved in open source development. Everybody has their own reasons, but for me there are three main ones:

  • I have fun: The most important reason is that it is fun. At openSUSE, we have great conferences, geekos everywhere, geeko cookies, openSUSE beer, fun stickers,… and the most important part: we have fun when working!
  • I learn a lot: In most of the projects, every single line of code is reviewed. That means not only that the code quality is better, but also that every time you write something wrong or that can be improved, someone will tell you. In open source, we think that making mistakes is perfectly fine. That people correct you is the best way to learn.
  • People: I have the chance to work with really skilled people all around the world, who are interested in the same things as me.

Why GSoC?

Starting is always difficult, but you don’t have to do it alone! In openSUSE, you will always find people to help you, and with GSoC this is even easier. The best feature of the program is that you will always have at least one mentor (most likely two) who will lead you through it. In addition, you will work in a project used in the real world by many users and all your code will be released under an open source license, so everybody can access, use, study, change and share it. Last, you will receive a stipend between 2,400 and 6,600 dollars depending on the country.

Projects

At openSUSE, you can find projects written in Ruby on RailsPerlRubyHTML/JavaScriptC/C++ and much more. This year you can work during GSoC in some of the most central and biggest projects in openSUSE: Open Build ServiceopenQA and YaST. They will for sure be challenging projects to work in, but don’t get scared, as that means that you will learn a lot from it too. And remember that your mentors and other openSUSE contributors will be there to help you!

But we also have simpler projects such as Trollolo, where any computer science university student could get started with Ruby. The desire to learn is much more important than the previous experience and knowledge.

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Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

February 8th, 2018 by

This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

The Wayland session has already been tested by openQA as part of the Tumbleweed release process as was mentioned in a previous news post, but now this is also done for live media. So, if you want to test Wayland without touching your existing installation, why not give the live media a try?

As always, have a lot of fun!

openSUSE Leap 15 Reaches Beta Phase Snapshots

January 31st, 2018 by

The development version of openSUSE Leap 15 has reached its beta phase builds and snapshots are available for testers via http://download.opensuse.org/distribution/leap/15.0/iso/.

Exactly like the rolling development model used to make openSUSE Leap 42.3, Leap 15.0 will use the same model until its final build. No concrete milestones will be used building up to the final release, which is expected in late Spring. As bugs are fixed and new packages introduced or excluded, snapshots of the latest beta phase builds will be released once they pass openQA testing; the first beta version build (Build 109.3) of openSUSE Leap 15 was recently released and there are currently two follow-on beta builds that would feature minor improvements if the beta builds pass openQA .

Announcements of new builds will be made on the opensuse-factory mailing list.

The beta Leap builds feature an all new fresh look, the Linux Long-Term-Support Kernel (LTS)  4.12* Kernel and users can test out KDE’s next LTS release of Plasma 5.12.

One bigger update remains to be integrated, wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel; that being rpm 4.14 that was released in openSUSE Tumbleweed just two weeks ago.

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GStreamer, Mesa Packages Updated in Tumbleweed

June 29th, 2017 by

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought a few major release packages and a clear example for how the automated testing tool openQA  can prevents a snapshot from being released.

The unicode character map Gucharmap, which uses the gtk+ toolkit and runs on any platform that gtk+ supports, was updated to version 10.0.0 in the repositories in the 20170625 snapshot. The GNOME project updated translations and support of editors like Bluefish as well as many others. Other major release were also in the 20170625 snapshot. An update of net-tools to version 2.0 dropped the network statistics (netstat) Extended Internet Daemon (xinetd) service to phase out xinetd. Users of the proc file-system get cgroup namespaces with the arrival of the psmisc 23.0 package.

Some minor version updates in the 20170625 snapshot were made to kexec-tools 2.0.14, which had backport upstream with fixes, and drbd 9.0.8, which is a block device which is designed to build high availability clusters, merged some changes preparing for compatibility with the Linux Kernel 4.12. Yast2-bootloader made some changes to autoYaST configurations in version 3.3.0.

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Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Users New Vulkan, 4.9.7 Kernel

February 9th, 2017 by

Six Tumbleweed snapshots this week brought users newer versions of GStreamer, Wine, Vulkan, and a new Linux Kernel.

The new 4.9.7 kernel arrived over the weekend with the 20170204 snapshot.

The new kernel sources updated config files and fixed a build failure specific to DWARF (Debugging with Attributed Records Format). The snapshot added support for the Perl client ddclient to version 3.8.3 and yast2-installation 3.2.20 added an all-in-one installation overview for SUSE’s new Container as a Service Platform product. More information about CaaSP and transactional updates can be found in a video presented by Thorsten Kukuk at FOSDEM.

GNU Compiler Collection 6.3.1 passed testing in openQA and made it into the 20170205 snapshot and so did python-cryptography 1.7.2 and getdata 0.10.0, which is a library that provides an Application Programming Interface (API) to interface with Dirfile databases.

The 20170206 snapshot gave users Wine 2.1, which provided fixes that were deferred during the code freeze and Direct2D rendering improvements. Mercurial 4.1 reduced server-side PCU usage with a new compression engine.

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