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Tumbleweed Snapshots Deliver Curl, Salt, FFmpegs Packages Updates

April 18th, 2019 by

Three quality openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot were released since last Thursday with updated packages for Curl, Salt, FFmpeg and more.

Mozilla Firefox had a minor release of version 66.0.3 in the latest Tumbleweed 20190415 snapshot. The browser addressed some performance issues with some HTML5 games and provided a Baidu search plugin for Chinese users and China’s Internet space. The command-line tool for transferring data using various protocols, curl 7.64.1 fixed many bugs and added additional libraries to check for Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) support. The update of libvirt 5.2.0 dropped a few patches and added several new features like Storage Pool Capabilities to get a more detailed list XML output for the virConnectGetStoragePoolCapabilites Application Programming Interface (API) and libvirt also enabled firmware autoselection for the open-source emulator QEMU. The newest salt 2019.2.0 package in Tumbleweed enhanced network automation and broadened support for a variety of network operating systems, and features for configuration manipulation or operational command execution. Salt also  added running playbooks to the 2019.2.0 release with the playbooks function and it includes an ansible playbooks state module, which can be used on a targeted host to run ansible playbooks, or used in an orchestration state runner. The snapshot was trending at a 95 rating at the time of publishing this article, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190412 was trending at a 94 and that package brought an update to Ceph that added a separate option to config a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) port. The cifs-utils 6.9 package, which is part of the Samba Project, added fixes for Azure and removed several patches. The libssh2_org 1.8.2 package fixed a misapplied patch that broke its previous version. A few YaST packages had some updates like the yast2-storage-ng 4.2.5 package that allows for a new format for importing/exporting Network File System (NFS) drives.

The 20190411 snapshot started off the week and it posted a moderately stable rating of 89. This snapshot brought the 5.0.7 Linux Kernel and it offered up a mitigation potential for a ptrace system call for PowerPC. There were some bug fixes for codecs, filters and formats in the ffmpeg 4.1.3 update. The JavaScript Bindings for GNOME, gjs 1.56.0, had a significantly large changelog recording info from the previous 1.54.3 version that was in Tumbleweed. The previous logs identified a GNU Compiler Collection 9 bug and added some ESLint rules. The new version was a stable version bump. The python-kiwi  9.17.35 package fixed regressions for the kiwi-repart dracut module. The wget 1.20.3 package fixed the buffer overflow vulnerability found in Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)-2019-5953. Text editor vim 8.1.1137 fixed several bugs including a Python test that didn’t wipe out hidden buffer and a space in number column that was on wrong side with ‘rightleft’ set.

GSoC Blog: openSUSE Conference 2018

June 6th, 2018 by

Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Matheus de Sousa Bernardo. Matheus is assisting with improving API and workflow of Trollolo, which is a cli-tool that helps teams using Trello to organize their work, as part of his Google Summer of Code project.

Uyuni: Forking Spacewalk with Salt and Containers

May 26th, 2018 by

PRAGUE, Czech Republic – Members of a new open source community project called Uyuni announced today at openSUSE Conference that a fork of the open-source systems management solution Spacewalk is on its way.

The intention of the fork is to give new inspiration to a project that has been perceived as idling in recent years. Uyuni, however is already looking at increasing the implementation of a React web User Interface, translations, clients, container and Kubernetes integration. Uyuni is using Salt for configuration management, thereby inheriting its name: Uyuni refers to the world’s largest Salt flat, Salar de Uyuni in Southwest Bolivia.

Compatible and Innovative

“Uyuni has a vision for this open-source code and plans on growing its community and innovating the code beyond its current state in Spacewalk,” said Klaus Kämpf, SUSE’s Project Owner of SUSE Manager, who announced the fork. “Contributions for Spacewalk have decreased and focused more on maintenance and stabilization than on innovation.”

Uyuni will stay compatible, Kämpf adds as much as possible: “The Uyuni project will not break up compatibility on purpose, but that shall not prevent improvements for that reason.”

The current development plans are releasing a first version this summer, and then deciding on a release model together with the community.

Development will have automated testing using both the Open Build Service and Cluster Infrastructure.

A New Vision Sparking Contributions

Results from GitHub show the frequency of contributions have dwindled since 2014 and the current Spacewalk faq website states “Red Hat’s code contributions will decrease over time, as the focus shifts to maintenance and stabilization of the current set of features.”

A fact listed from the previous Spacewalk FAQ website, which has since been removed, stated, “As Red Hat’s participation ramps down, there will be an opportunity for the participation from other community members to ramp up. Someone (or several someones!) will need to take over some of the management role that currently rests on Red Hat.”

Uyuni community members decided to fork the project after extensive discussions with Red Hat about taking over the management role as stated above.

Spacewalk is an open source Linux systems management solution, currently available in version 2.8 as upstream community project for Red Hat Satellite 5. SUSE Manager is also based on Spacewalk and now plans on shifting to Uyuni as an upstream community.

“SUSE Manager’s development will be openly available to open-source community members for whatever contributions they would like to make to the Uyuni project,” Kämpf said.

Interested members can follow the project on https://github.com/uyuni-project, www.uyuni-project.org, or via Twitter at @UyuniProject. A presentation about Uyuni can be viewed on the openSUSETV YouTube channel or via the live stream for the conference at 9:30 a.m. UTC on https://streaming.media.ccc.de/osc18/.

Conference Talks Uploaded, Stream is Live

May 27th, 2017 by

This year’s openSUSE Conference has so far been a blast and the talks  from Day 1 of the conference have already been uploaded to the openSUSETV YouTube channel.

For the people who couldn’t make it to this year’s conference, they can watch the live stream of the conference at http://streaming.media.ccc.de/osc17/. There are two rooms (Galerie and Saal) being live streamed and recorded.

Starting out the conference, Matthias Kirschner, President of Free Software Foundation Europe, delivered a terrific keynote and gave several thought provoking questions about who will be the torchbearer for open-source software and questioned whether it is necessary to have a torchbearer since there are so many examples of success of open-source software.

Chief Technology Officer and co-founder of SaltStack, Thomas Hatch, gave a great keynote today and yesterday gave a talk about “My Move to SUSE.”

Thorsten Kukuk introduced openSUSE Kubic as a project under the openSUSE Project and Leap release manager Ludwig Nussel touched on the status of Leap; past, present and future.

Another great talk recommended for system administrators and developers from the  open-source community is Wolfgang Engel’s talk about SUSE Package Hub and how SUSE is bringing community packages to enterprise users.