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Archive for September, 2010

Deadline for travel and hotel sponsorship requests for openSUSE conference

September 29th, 2010 by

Hi all!

Friday the 1st of October will be the deadline for requesting travel and hotel sponsorship requests for the openSUSE conference. We will notify those who will receive support next week, some have already had mail about their hotel. Please note that our budget is limited, we’d like to help those who need it most!

Greetings,
Your Friendly Conference Team

openSUSE Ambassadors rocking around the world!

September 29th, 2010 by

Last week our Ambassadors did what they do every week: promote openSUSE. They went to meetings, conferences and tradeshows for a talk or staffing a booth. And they organized meetings, gave students lessons in using openSUSE, handed out DVD’s and valuable knowledge.

Many visitors of this site have no idea how active our ambassadors really are. The amount of work they do is amazing and they deserve a bit more of a spotlight on what they do! Their reports are usually highlighted in our weekly news, be sure to check their work out each week.

Read on for a short selection of reports which came in over the last week by the openSUSE ambassadors. And note that we get reports like this almost every day! Some come in the form of text, others like this one by Bruno about attending FrOSCamp 2010 in Zürich are in the form of a nice presentation (very much worth a look).

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OSC2010 Sneak Peaks – Take an LPI exam at openSUSE Conference 2010

September 28th, 2010 by

Thanks to the support of Linux Professional Institute (LPI) we are able to provide a number of the well known and useful LPI exams to be taken at the openSUSE Conference 2010. Examination day will be Saturday, October 23 from 9 to 11am.

Exams offered :

  • LPIC-1 und LPIC-2 (101, 102, 201, 202) – in German and English
  • LPIC-3 (301, 302, 303, 304) – English only
  • Univention Certified Professional Prüfung (LPI 198) – German only

For further information and registration please visit our LPI page.

Dank der Unterstützung des Linux Professional Institute (LPI) können wir auf der diesjährigen openSUSE Konferenz 2010 verschiedene der bekannten und nützlichen LPI Prüfungen anbieten. Prüfungstag ist Samstag 23. Oktober von 9 bis 11 Uhr.

Mögliche Examen:

  • LPIC-1 und LPIC-2 (101, 102, 201, 202) – auf Deutsch und Englisch
  • LPIC-3 (301, 302, 303, 304) – auf Englisch
  • Univention Certified Professional Prüfung (LPI 198) – auf Deutsch
Mehr Information und die Anmeldung gibt’s auf unserer LPI Seite

openSUSE: Target Aquired

September 27th, 2010 by

Hi all,Future Lizard!\

Over the last week you have all given input on the new strategy document describing the target users of openSUSE. It saw quite a bit of rewriting and rephrasing but it seems the description fitted most of your perceptions. We have incorporated all the comments into the document and a new iteration can be found on co-ment.

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openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 142 is out!

September 25th, 2010 by

We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News #142.
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openSUSE Wiki Upgrade

September 24th, 2010 by

We have just completed the upgrade to the 1.16 release of MediaWiki.  This release comes with several improvements in functionality and performance.  Anyone who is interested in more information can view the release notes here.

As part of this deployment, 6 additional wikis (Dutch, French, Greek, Portugese, Russian, and Spanish) have been converted to the new wiki system.  These wikis now have the same themes and functionality as the English wiki, including Lucene search.

Later today, we will be moving the wiki files to the data center SAN.  The wikis should remain live throughout the entire process.  However, file uploads will be disabled and anyone editing the wiki faces a small risk of losing their session.  A warning message will be posted on the wiki during this move, which should take less than an hour.

OSC2010 Sneak Peaks – Bernhard Wiedemann: Automated Testing

September 22nd, 2010 by
The openSUSE Conference brings together users, contributors and friends of the openSUSE project from 20th to 23rd October in Nuremberg, Germany. Over four days, more than seventy talks and workshops explore the theme of ‘Collaboration Across Borders‘ in Free and Open Source software communities, administration and development. The conference is the yearly get-together of the openSUSE project to give its people a chance to meet face to face, talk to and inspire each other. It takes place in the Berufsförderungswerk Nuremberg in the beautiful surroundings of the Franconian metropole. Everybody interested is welcome to join and enjoy the program which starts each day at 9am, the admission is free.



The openSUSE Conference 2010 Sneak Peaks will introduce some speakers and talks to you. This time we explore the automatism’s inside our testing team together with Bernhard Wiedemann.

Bernhard! How many ISOs did you boot today? :-)

Hi Henne! None today, as factory is slow providing new ones. But I ran three ISOs yesterday, finding a new segfault.

Ah darn, I thought you would spit out an interesting high number!

But the total number of runs since I started counting in April is already quite impressive!

wc -l video/runlog.txt
1525 video/runlog.txt

So this is what you do and this is what you talk is about right? You came up with a neat way to test our distribution. But before we explore that how about you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I am who I am. A geek, a programmer, a father, a husband… sometimes even a poet and a philosopher. Thinking is one of the hardest things to do, this is probably why so few people do it.

Where are you from and how did you come to the openSUSE testing team?

Ick bin eeen Berliner” to use a famous quote. To the testing team I came by coincidence as so many great things in live. I saw the message from Holgi (the founder of the testing team) on the forums when he was looking for members.

Could you explain to us what testing exactly means?

When we started the Testing Core Team (the “Core” is intended to let people know that others can and should do testing as well) I only had a vague idea of what testing could be. One part is systematic testing. e.g. Larry Finger has been trying all encryption modes of wireless lan in combination with static and dynamic address assignment… but then there is the other testing which is just “using” beta releases and reporting issues because some issues are only spotted when you really try to use software.

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Easily Building Software for Multiple Distributions and Platforms

September 20th, 2010 by

In a little over a month, the openSUSE conference 2010 will start under the title “collaboration accross borders”. This article highlights one of the main topics at this conference — a truly border-crossing technology called the Build Service. This technology helps developers target many different linux distributions with their software quickly and easily, and the openSUSE conference offers the perfect opportunity to get some “inside information” and share ideas towards fast-tracking the software packaging process. Read on to learn more about the Build Service and what it can do for you!
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openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 141 is out!

September 18th, 2010 by

We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News.

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OSC2010 Sneak Peaks – Vincent Untz: Explaining GNOME 3

September 15th, 2010 by
The openSUSE Conference brings together users, contributors and friends of the openSUSE project from 20th to 23rd October in Nuremberg, Germany. Over four days, more than seventy talks and workshops explore the theme of ‘Collaboration Across Borders‘ in Free and Open Source software communities, administration and development. The conference is the yearly get-together of  the openSUSE project to give its people a chance to meet face to face, talk to and inspire each other. It takes place in the Berufsförderungswerk Nuremberg in the beautiful surroundings of the Franconian metropole. Everybody interested is welcome to join and enjoy the program which starts each day at 9am, the admission is free. The openSUSE Conference 2010 Sneak Peaks will introduce some speakers and talks to you.

Today we feature the talk “Explaining GNOME 3″ from Vincent Untz.


Hey Vincent, glad to have you on this series. Let’s talk (about) the talk. First of all I would like you to introduce yourself to the, likely, small crowd of people who don’t know you yet. Who are you and what do you do?

For the very few people who don’t know me (I estimate there are only a few billions out there), I’m Vincent. The two important things to know about me are that I’m French and I love ice cream. And when I’m not eating ice cream, I also contribute to free software! I work on openSUSE and on GNOME, and apparently, I can also work on both at the same time, when I work on GNOME in openSUSE :-) Thanks to Novell, I can contribute on my work time since I’m a member of the openSUSE Boosters.

… and here we are, thinking you only eat baguettes!

So, obviously, I don’t know if your baguette comment will end up in the interview. But if it does, I have to mention that ice cream and baguettes do not mix well.

Everything will end up in the interview, so behave! :) Okay given the title of your talk, Explaining GNOME 3, i take it it will be about explaining gnome 3 right? What needs explaining there?

Ah, I guess, one thing to know about me too is that I submit talks with titles, without knowing what I’ll talk about ;-) So it could well be that “Explaining GNOME 3″ turns out to be about something completely different. That being said, I might keep the submitted topic since GNOME 3 is a big step for the GNOME project, and what we are trying to achieve is not always crystal clear from the outside. There are at least two parts of the talks that I can think of right now, which will likely be of interest to the audience:

  1. Why does the GNOME project need to do GNOME 3, instead of keeping the 2.x way forever? After all, GNOME 2.x is all about evolutionary steps, and that’s something we could keep doing.
  2. The vision of what we want GNOME 3 to be. People do not always see the long-term vision of a project, and clarifying it does help understand the changes we’re implementing.

A third part that we feel is important is explaining GNOME Shell: it’s a big move where people feel it will directly affect their interaction with the computer

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