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Command Line Tuesdays – Part Three

July 1st, 2014 by

Heya Geekos! New week, new part in our CLT series!

Today, mr Shotts takes us on a first part of a guided tour through our file system. We’ll learn how to visit, list files within directories and we’ll learn to use some options for the first time. So let’s begin with the first command of the week.

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Artwork Overhaul a Possibility in openSUSE 13.2?

June 28th, 2014 by

As we stated in one of our earlier articles, the openSUSE team is working full steam. Even though it may sometimes seem quiet news-wise, it’s not so by any means. So, let’s look at the progress the artwork team has been making since the last time we posted about new bling-bling hitting openSUSE 13.2.

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Command Line Tuesdays – Part Two

June 24th, 2014 by

Heya geekos!

Let’s refresh our memories. Last week, we skimmed through some basic commands, learned what a shell is actually, and made a steady introduction into our CLI Tuesdays series.

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Command Line Tuesdays – Part One

June 10th, 2014 by

Here we are geekos, back in action! Sorry it’s been a while, but let me just assure you we’re back on track, raging to meet the deadlines and to, well, have some fun :)

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Command Line Tuesdays – The Introductory

May 27th, 2014 by

Hi Geekos!

Today we’re introducing a new series, called ‘Command Line Tuesdays‘. Why command line Tuesdays? Because in this series, everyday computer enthusiasts like yours truly, will try to step a little out of bounds of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) Culture, which is today synonymous to ‘making stuff easier for the masses‘.

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openSUSE Welcomes its GSoC 2014 students

May 26th, 2014 by

openSUSE welcomes Google Summer of Code 2014 participants. Thanks to Google, openSUSE has an excellent number of slots and an equally excellent number of mentors and students for Google Summer of Code 2014. Throughuout the summer, students participanting in this program will code for openSUSE and its sister organizations ownCloud, MATE and Zorp and help them move forward. The best part of GSoC is that most of the code written by students will go upstream and will benefit openSUSE in general also. Along with this, we have an equally good range of projects that will improve the existing openSUSE architecture.

The list of successful students are :

  1. Travel Support Program application –     Karthik Senthil
  2. Playlist Functionality for ownCloud Music App –    Volkan
  3. ownCloud Calendar Application in angularJS –    Raghu Nayyar
  4. openSUSE GSOC ideas: Cool live flash –    Zsolt Peter Basak
  5. Open Source Event Manager (OSEM): Refactor user management model -  Stella Rouzi
  6. Open Source Event Manager (OSEM): Implemention Organizer Dashboard –    cbruckmayer
  7. MATE: Port from deprecated GStreamer 0.10 –    Michal Ratajsky
  8. Integrate Snapper Snapshot browsing into openSUSE Desktop tools -  Oguz Kayral
  9. Implement an application-level LBaaS driver for Zorp –    Péter Vörös
  10. Extend Git-Review to support BitBucket –    xystushi
  11. Event Splash page for Visitors In Open Source Event Manager Application. –    Gopesh Tulsyan
  12. ePub support in Atril (MATE) –    Avishkar gupta
  13. Add Snapshot management API to libvirt Xenlight driver –    David Kiarie
  14. Improving the functionality of the extensions system in Caja  – Alexandervdm

In the following weeks we will talk a lot more about these projects and get to know these students well.

Lets brew some code now.

Gnome Classic edition of openSUSE-Education

May 22nd, 2014 by

If you have fun, the rest is easy…

Classic main menu The openSUSE-Education team is proud to announce the availability of another great release: the GNOME classic edition.

This one is nearly identical to the MATE desktop, but already includes a few minor bug fixes and some additional applications:

are added to the (already huge) list of available applications.

Quoting Jigish Gohil:

classic is so much better than standard gnome  i wonder why it is not standard

BTW: openSUSE Education releases always contain the latest official openSUSE updates and other cool stuff, so you should be able to get an up-to date live system up and running in a few seconds/minutes (depending on your hardware) – which can also be installed on your local hard disk with just a few mouse clicks. Just click on the “Live-Install” icon on the desktop.

Get Li-f-e GNOME Classic edition from here: direct Download | md5sum | Alternate download and mirrors

You want to join the team? Just ping us at #opensuse-education. We are hiring community members to help out on web work and marketing (be warned: we currently pay in honor and fun).

What Will openSUSE 13.2 Default Wallpaper Look Like?

May 22nd, 2014 by

Eppur si muove! Even though we sometimes feel there’s a sort of a standstill once first major bugs are fixed in a new release and it settles on our machine, that’s not the case by any viable metric. The openSUSE team works diligently on delivering a new release (openSUSE 13.2) ever since 13.1 was released, and among them, we find the artwork team, which is brainstorming the creation and subsequent selection of the new default wallpaper of the next openSUSE release (the awesome picture your desktop defaults to after installation).

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Spreading the Word on the Geeko – Support is Back!

May 21st, 2014 by

openSUSE Booth
Spreading the word about our project has again become a little bit easier. As announced during the Opening Keynote at oSC14 the reimbursement program for locally produced materials is BACK!

We would like to thank Jim Henderson, who will lead the team, Shawn Dunn, and Alexandros Vennos for volunteering their time to manage the requests. The program is funded with up to $200 US per event with a limit of $2000 US per quarter. The initiative is no limited to events as in small local conferences. If you need material for a local LUG meeting or if you can produce material for a “permanent” display of openSUSE in a University or other public place of interest use this program.

promoting openSUSE

How does it work?

The process is outlined in the wiki and will share the Travel Support Program application. Basically you will need to submit a request through the application prior to the time of need. The team will evaluate the information and get back to you in a reasonable amount of time. The team may also decide that it may be worth sending out a booth box instead of producing material locally. If you accept the booth box the request will be handled for you if booth boxes are available at the time. After you have approval you can go ahead and produce the material for the event/promotion campaign. Once the event is completed provide a report, blog post on lizards or your own blog for example and submit your receipts. That’s it. For permanent displays, the “event” is obviously “never” over, thus you’d just submit your receipt after you setup the display (hang up the posters), send along a picture and some advertisement, possibly on social media and that’s it.

We tried to keep things as simple as possible while still assuring that there’s some verifiable bang for the buck for our project. After all having posters hanging in someone’s basement does not hep us find more users or contributors.
Geeko's at the booth

What else?

A word on the booth boxes and larger events. A list of events where we would like to have people represent our project is in the works and will soon appear on the wiki. Booth boxes for those events have been set aside. Keep an eye out for an announcement about the events list and a call for advocates to represent the project. As a hint, OSCON is happening from July 20-24 in Portland Oregon and we have no one yet organizing a local team to show off openSUSE.

The local production reimbursement program is live and you can start using it today. As we are just starting out there are bound to be some rough edges, thus please be patient, provide as much feedback as possible about the process and the handling of things to allow everyone involved to improve the initiative for everyone that might want to take advantage of it.

Go and spread the word about openSUSE and Have a lot of fun…

openSUSE Edu Li-f-e MATE available

May 19th, 2014 by

The openSUSE-Education team is proud to present a special, 64-bit edition of openSUSE Edu Li-f-e with the MATE desktop environment.

Li-f-e MATE desktop

Li-f-e MATE edition came about to support schools in Gujarat, India, they needed synfig studio: a very simple to use C and Java IDE, apart from standard fare of complete office suite and other applications. Gujarat now starts teaching open(libre)office in 9th grade, and Linux operating system all the way to shell scripting in 10th, and Java, C, HTML, Javascript etc in 11th and 12 grades. This Li-f-e edition tries to get everything they need in an integrated bundle which they can use on a stand alone PC or set up LTSP server to PXE boot their entire lab without having to modify their existing setup on the client PC side.

The MATE desktop was choosen as default desktop manager as it looks close to the pictures in their textbook, however latest GNOME desktop is also available at the login screen. MATE is well known for being a traditional desktop environment, a fork of the classic GNOME 2 session. It uses a two-panel layout and darkish theme, as well as a neat collection of educational apps, such as gElemental, Scilab, Xcos, Scinotes, Geany, Inkscape, Synfig Studio, Bluefish, Epoptes, and LTSP.

Default applications include the Pidgin multi-protocol instant messenger, Mozilla Firefox web browser, GIMP image editor, pluma text editor, VLC Media Player, as well as the entire LibreOffice office suite.

Download the operating system as a Live DVD ISO image that must be burned onto a DVD discs or written on a USB flash drive in order to boot it from the BIOS of the PC.

As with all openSUSE-Education releases, we based on the recently released openSUSE (13.1) with all the official online updates applied.

Get Li-f-e MATE from here: direct Download | md5sum | Alternate download and mirrors

Quoting Marius Nestor on softpedia.com :

openSUSE Edu Li-f-e MATE is a surprise addition to the educational edition of the award winning and widely used openSUSE Linux operating system. The MATE desktop environment will provide for a faster working environment suitable for classroom use.