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openSUSE to have Summit in Dublin

October 16th, 2019 by

The openSUSE Community is going to Ireland March 27 and 28, 2020, for openSUSE Summit Dublin.

Registration for the summit has begun and the Call for Papers is open until Feb. 14.

The summit will begin at the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encouraged to register for the summit and submit a talk.

The schedule for the openSUSE Summit Dublin will be posted on Feb. 17.

There is an openSUSE and open source track. There are three talks that can be submitted for the summit. One is a short talk with a 15-minute limit;a normal talk with a with a 30-minute limit and a long talk with a 45-minute limit.

Attendees of SUSECON are welcome to attend and submit talks. openSUSE Summit Dublin is a free community event that will take place on the last day of SUSECON and the Saturday that follows SUSECON.

Contact ddemaio (@) opensuse.org if you have any questions concerning the summit.

Kata Containers Packages are Available officially in openSUSE Tumbleweed

August 17th, 2019 by

Kata Containers is an open source container runtime that is crafted to seamlessly plug into the containers ecosystem.

We are now excited to announce that the Kata Containers packages are finally available in the official openSUSE Tumbleweed repository.

It is worthwhile to spend few words explaining why this is a great news, considering the role of Kata Containers (a.k.a. Kata) in fulfilling the need for security in the containers ecosystem, and given its importance for openSUSE and Kubic.

What is Kata

As already mentioned, Kata is a container runtime focusing on security and on ease of integration with the existing containers ecosystem. If you are wondering what’s a container runtime, this blog post by Sascha will give you a clear introduction about the topic.

Kata should be used when running container images whose source is not fully trusted, or when allowing other users to run their own containers on your platform.

Traditionally, containers share the same physical and operating system (OS) resources with host processes, and specific kernel features such as namespaces are used to provide an isolation layer between host and container processes. By contrast, Kata containers run inside lightweight virtual machines, adding an extra isolation and security layer, that minimizes the host attack surface and mitigates the consequences of containers breakout. Despite this extra layer, Kata achieves impressive runtime performances thanks to KVM hardware virtualization, and when configured to use a minimalist virtual machine manager (VMM) like Firecracker, a high density of microVM can be packed on a single host.

If you want to know more about Kata features and performances:

  • katacontainers.io is a great starting point.
  • For something more SUSE oriented, Flavio gave a interesting talk about Kata at SUSECON 2019,
  • Kata folks hang out on katacontainers.slack.com, and will be happy to answer any quesitons.

Why is it important for Kubic and openSUSE

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First Phase for openSUSE Conference Talks Begins

February 13th, 2019 by

openSUSE is pleased to announce the first phase for accepting talks for the openSUSE Conference 2019 (oSC19) has begun.

A total of 80 talks were submitted during the call for papers, which began in late fall and ended Feb. 4. In total, there were 42 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 19 short talks and seven lighting talks submitted.

The review team rated all the submitted abstracts and selected 22 normal talks, two long workshops, four short workshops, 13 short talks and five lighting talks.

Speakers have been notified of their accepted talk and must confirm their talk by March 1. If a speaker doesn’t confirm their talk by March 1, the talk will be withdrawn and the next highest rated talks will be accepted to fill the slot as part of the second phase of the talk selections for oSC19. Phase 2 will run from March 2 to March 16. The schedule for the conference will be published shortly after Phase 2.

There are five tracks listed for the conference this year. The tracks are:

  • openSUSE
  • Open Source Software
  • Cloud and Containers
  • Embedded Systems
  • Desktop and Applications

The openSUSE Conference will take place at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26.

Visit events.opensuse.org for more information about oSC19 or email ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

And the Race is On! 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections Enter Campaign Phase

January 15th, 2019 by

Nominations and applications for Candidates came to a close Sunday, January 13, 2019, and the Campaign Phase of the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections kicked in Monday, January 14, with a seventh impressive Candidate, Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha entering the race for the three vacant Board Seats.

Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha

Marina is a very active Italian openSUSE Advocate, involved in the Project since 2009, deeply involved in LibreOffice.  She relocated to Munich last June, where she is working for CIB mainly on its LibreOffice team as Senior Migrations & Deployments Engineer.  You may read more about Marina on her Wiki User page.

Marina joins an already impressive line-up of Quality Candidates who announced they were stepping up during the past week, adding to what will be very tough decisions for the Voters in the upcoming Elections.  Official openSUSE Members in Good Standing are qualified to vote in the Elections, and they will have to make difficult choices for who should take the three open Board Seats, choosing between Marina, incumbent Christian Boltz aka cboltz, Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB, incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, Sébastien Poher aka sogal, Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv, and Nathan Wolf aka futureboy and CubicleNate on IRC.

Sarah and Sébastien’s run for the Board was announced in last Wednesday’s openSUSE News, while the Candidacies of Christian, Dr. Braun, Vinzenz, and  Nathan were announced in the next day’s news article.

Drive Still Underway for New openSUSE Members

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members, and it is especially important for the Elections process.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Applications for openSUSE Membership are accepted and processed on an ongoing basis, but a Membership Drive has been declared by the Elections Officials in an effort to get as many qualified Project Contributors to take part in the voting process, which is scheduled to begin February 4, 2019, and run for 12 days with ballots closing February 15.

Contributors Should Get Involved

All openSUSE Contributors and Members are requested to actively urge other Contributors who are not Members to get their Membership and get out and vote.  All Members who have been approved by the Membership Committee before the start of balloting February 4 will be eligible to vote in this election.

You can apply for openSUSE Membership by following the instructions here.

First Two Candidates for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections Announced

January 9th, 2019 by

The Elections Committee announced today, Tuesday, January 8, 2019, the first two Candidates who have passed the application and eligibility process and are declared as officially running for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections as the January 13 deadline for Candidate Applications is swiftly approaching.

Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, incumbent

Outgoing Board Member Sarah Julia Kriesch, aka AdaLovelace, is seeking her second term on the Board as an encumbent.  Sarah, from Nuremberg, Germany, is a work-experienced student in Computer Science at the Nuremberg Institute of Technology and has been working as a Student Research Assistant.

A very active openSUSE Contributor, Sébastien Poher, has also thrown his hat into the ring for the first time and is bringing energy and an impressive list of openSUSE activity to the elections race.

Three openSUSE Board Seats Vacant

Three Board Seats are vacant in this election with the January 13 deadline to apply as a Candidate looming.  Eligibility to run for the Board positions is based on having an openSUSE Membership in Good Standing, so anyone who qualifies still has a few days left to join the Elections process and give the Members a good variety of choices for these important positions.

More Candidates are Required

The Project is best served if it has a good variety of openSUSE Enthusiasts to choose from during the Elections.

Members who are willing to step up and pay things forward by serving on the openSUSE Board are urged to apply by sending an application to the Project Mailing List and to the Elections Officials following the instructions on the official Elections page.

openSUSE Membership Drive Still Underway

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members, and it is especially important for the Elections process.  Applications for openSUSE Membership are accepted and processed on an ongoing basis, but a Membership Drive has been declared by the Elections Officials in an effort to get as many qualified Project Contributors to take part in the voting process, which is scheduled to begin February 4, 2019, and run for 12 days with ballots closing February 15.

All openSUSE Contributors and Members are requested to actively urge other Contributors who are not Members to get their Membership and get out and vote.  All Members who have been approved by the Membership Committee before the start of balloting February 4 will be eligible to vote in this election.

You can apply for openSUSE Membership by following the instructions here.

 

 

openSUSE Develops Legal Review System

November 8th, 2018 by

The open-source community has a new project designed to help Linux/GNU distributions with the legal review process of licenses.

The new project called Cavil is legal review system that is collectively beneficial not only for the  openSUSE Project, but distributions and projects that want to use it.

The project provides an add-on service for the Open Build Service.

Every OBS request for openSUSE Factory goes through a legal review process to ensure licenses are compatible. Cavil indexes these and creates a legal report for every single request. Bot comments in OBS are made through the legal-auto python script, but the entire project is much larger than the script and bots.

Sebastian Riedel and Stephan Kulow have been developing the project for two years and it has been used in production for more than a year and half. The Cavil legal review system replaces an older system and provides much more efficiency. Cavil can automatically accept more than 90 percent of all new requests based on data from previous reviews, so packages are much more streamlined into openSUSE Factory.

The project has been so efficient that two lawyers who do all the legal reviews with the system, which is also used by SUSE, had reviewed about 110,000 packages this past year. The same lawyers curated a library with 27.000 license patterns for 600 licenses and 20 license patterns for 100 of the  most common licenses that are used to create legal reports. Riedel said there is a desire hope to expand that in the future with the hope of collecting new patterns with the open-source community.

The legal Data Base used by SUSE to generate reports with new license patterns  is about 2TB and has about 68.433.436 pattern matches in 27.319.682 individual files.

Like openQA, Cavil is written in Perl, with Mojolicious/Minion and PostgreSQL.

A quick look at the statistics about the content of the legal database showed the most popular open source licenses were GPL-2.0, BSD-3-Clause, GPL-Unspecified and MIT respectively.

openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

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openSUSE Heroes ♥ Let’s Encrypt™ – Expect certificate exchange

April 19th, 2018 by

openSUSE loves Let's Encrypt™

Maybe some of you noticed, that our certificate *.opensuse.org on many of services will expire soon (on 2018-04-23).

As we noticed that – as well – we decided to put a bit of work into this topic and we will use Let’s Encrypt certificates for the encrypted services of the openSUSE community.

This is just a short notice / announcement for all of you, that we are working on this topic at the moment. We will announce, together with the deployment of the new certificate, the regarding hashes and maybe some further information on our way of implementing things.

Just to give you a small number of services which will be affected, maybe you use one of the following list:

(This is a mixed list of services maintained by openSUSE Heroes and/or several SUSE teams for the openSUSE community – the certificate exchange will affect those services.)

  • build.opensuse.org
  • api.opensuse.org
  • openqa.opensuse.org
  • static.opensuse.org
  • ci.opensuse.org
  • svn.opensuse.org
  • software.opensuse.org
  • $LANG.opensuse.org for the several wiki instances
  • download.opensuse.org
  • keyserver.opensuse.org
  • …and many, many more :) – thanks to everybody in the openSUSE Heroes team for maintaining the zoo of services ;)

Thanks to the FLOSS & openSUSE community, we have full support of Let’s Encrypt certificates already on board our distribution.

As there are so many options to choose, we decided for the following tool to use Let’s Encrypt certificates:

  • dehydrated – as client with ACME v2 support – https://software.opensuse.org/package/dehydrated
    • with custom hook scripts, that will provide the wildcard-certificates to our proxy-infrastructure

Thanks to everybody involved in this task for getting the migration done.

Fun fact, as you might have noticed before, news.opensuse.org is not part of the openSUSE Heroes infrastructure (yet) and already got a new certificate from DigiCert.

Planned Outage To Affect openSUSE Services This Weekend

March 6th, 2018 by

A network outage this weekend will effect openSUSE services that have a Direct Connection to Nuremberg host infrastructure on Saturday, March 10, between the hours of 1 and 6 p.m. UTC.

The outage will last about 30 minutes and take place between the above listed hours.

The outage effects only external connections due to maintenance in the datacenter. All services will run without any downtime.

openSUSE Heroes offsite 2018

March 5th, 2018 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoThe first weekend in March 2018, the openSUSE Heroes met again in-person, after one year of infrastructure work, which was mostly done from home.

After our last in-person meeting in December 2016, we saw each-other in person at openSUSE conference 2017 and maybe at some other events like release parties – but now it’s the time of the year when it’s very cold outside – so we decided to stay one weekend inside and talk about the topics for 2018 and the future of the openSUSE Heroes team. And getting some work done :).

You might imagine us now two days busy with hacking and a bunch of nerds in front of their preferred shell-window. But it’s the total opposite. Our main “tools” we used this weekend were a flip chart, our voices and a lot of coffee.

By the way, thanks a lot to SUSE for providing us with a room, a network connection, drinks, coffee and cookies. In fact we were given the new and shiny “SUSE Event Area” which was built by SUSE last year to host all kinds of internal, external and community events.

After one year of having our monthly meetings via IRC, we had a lot of topics to discuss and a lot of decisions to make about the openSUSE infrastructure in the future.

After a nice dinner on Day0, Friday 2018-03-02, where most of the Heroes arrived in Nuremberg, we started working on Saturday.

On the Day1, Saturday 2018-03-03 and Day2, Sunday 2018-03-04 we had the following topics on our list, worked through them, defined ToDos for the following months and assigned tasks.

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