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openSUSE Heroes Spring Into Action

July 19th, 2017 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoMike Tyson might have said it best when he said “everyone has a plan ‘till they get punched in the mouth.”

Tyson’s point is that plans change, especially in the moment of executing a plan and that’s exactly what the openSUSE Heroes did with updating the wikis; minus the punch in the mouth.

Yesterday evening the Heroes planned to move and update some of the localized wikis. Things worked better and faster than expected, and in the end, the openSUSE Heroes moved all 18 localized wikis from Provo to Nuremberg and updated them to MediaWiki 1.27.

This means all openSUSE wikis are now running on MediaWiki 1.27 and support the features announced for the English wiki last week.

Christian Boltz, a humble openSUSE Hero with the power to mass migrate wikis, didn’t have time to change the <feed> tags to the new <rss> tags in all the wikis, which he plans to do in the next few days. Boltz did express a challenge to see what other superhuman powers exist.

“I won’t complain if someone is faster and does it in some of the wikis,” Botlz wrote in an email to the openSUSE Project mailing list.

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Heroes preparing to make the leap

July 14th, 2017 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoYou might have noticed some normally unwanted activity over the last weeks affecting the openSUSE infrastructure – resulting in reduced availability or downtime of the provided services.

Today we are happy to announce that most of the infrastructure work is done and the openSUSE Heroes together with the SUSE-IT team achieved a lot – ready to welcome openSUSE Leap 42.3 in time!

There might be still the one or the other small issue – but we expect that the majority of services will be stable for now (until we prove something different ;-)

The very good news: while Leap 42.3 is approaching, a couple of machines hosting openSUSE services are already using the latest 42.3 release in production!

That is what we call testing!

So while the Heroes lean back now and let the dust settle for a moment, we are really looking forward to the next steps that are on our TODO  list.

What was done in detail?

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English openSUSE wiki updated and moved home

July 10th, 2017 by

The English openSUSE wiki has been moved and updated  successfully. If you encounter any issue, please let us know by mail to admin(@)opensuse.org.

On July 11, the MediaWiki instance hosted behind en.opensuse.org was set to read only, with some slight downtimes.

The reason for the downtime was the move of the wiki from the old Provo cluster to the new Nuremberg opensuse network.

Together with the move, the wiki was updated from MediaWiki 1.22 to 1.27, and the VM hosting it from an old SLE version to openSUSE Leap 42.3 (yes, we are eating our own dogfood!)

New features are:

–    including files directly from github -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:GitHub_inclusion

–    namespace-specific boilerplates (page templates) when creating new pages -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:MultiBoilerplate

–    better search (elasticsearch) – now searching all namespaces, but with different weight

–    login is now done using the Auth_remoteuser extension – but still with your openSUSE login

–    support for several map providers

–    switched extension for RSS feed integration (this needs adjustments on the pages that include RSS feeds) -> https://en.opensuse.org/Help:RSS_feeds

–    watching a category (when pages get added to or removed from it) is now part of MediaWiki core

–    removal of Hermes notifications – MediaWiki’s own notifications work much better

Please be patient while we are doing the update. We’ll update this article and the status.opensuse.org webpage, plus we’ll send a followup mail to the opensuse-announce mailinglist when everything is done.

After updating the English wiki, we will let the dust settle for some days, and plan to update the localized wikis next week.

Announcing openSUSE’s status page – status.opensuse.org

May 10th, 2017 by
Screenshot Status Page

Screenshot https://status.opensuse.org/

Worried about downtimes and maintenance windows of openSUSE services that you missed because there was no information provided? ;-)

Now is your chance to get informed about any (un-)expected downtime of any openSUSE service!

The openSUSE Heroes team is pleased to announce that status.opensuse.org is up and running as public status page, providing you with the latest updates about our infrastructure.  We tried our best to get the page mobile friendly and easy to understand. Even RSS and Atom feeds are available. A big “thank you” to the team from Cachet, the open source status page system, for developing that great tool.

You wonder where this status page get’s it’s information from?

For the moment, the Heroes will update the page manually with information – until our new monitoring system is up and running and can take over some parts of the job. Thanks to a nice API, updates and status queries can be done even via command line (and therefor integrated in whatever tool you can imagine). But as we want to provide you with the best information available, we might still use a “human form” instead of automatism. Let’s see what the future brings and how familiar we will get with the tool…

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OBS got the power!

February 25th, 2017 by

Old build workers, rack mounted

One year after introducing a new kind of Open Build Service worker machines, the “lambkins”, the openSUSE Build Service got a big hardware refresh. The new machines, sponsored by SUSE, are equipped with:

– 2,8GHz AMD Opteron Processors (6348)

– 256 GB RAM

– one 120 GB SSD

Four of them are located in a chassis with a height of 2 units and run 12-16 workers on them (virtual machines, that are building packages).

That new build power allowed us to remove some of old machines from the pool. The unified hardware makes the management of the machines a lot easier now, even if there are still the most powerful old machines left.

For those who like some more pictures, feel free to check the rest of the entry… (more…)

openSUSE Heroes December meeting – final results

February 25th, 2017 by

While we had some fun and good food and drinks, we also managed to discuss a lot during the three days in the Nuremberg headquarter. This was needed because this was the first time that the Heroes came together in their current form. In the end, we managed to do no coding and even (nearly) no administration – but instead we started to discuss our (internal and external) policies and work flows – and did some decisions regarding the next steps and the future of the openSUSE infrastructure.

openSUSE Heroes meeting

So what are our results – and how does the prioritized action item list look like?

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Announcing openSUSE’s GPG Key Server – keyserver.opensuse.org

December 6th, 2016 by

sks-keyserver logo Does it happen to you, too, that there are moments where you ask yourself why others want something from you that is there already since a while? Exactly this happened with https://keyserver.opensuse.org/: the original machine was set up a long time ago to make it easier for people attending the openSUSE GPG key-signing parties, but it looks like nobody officially announced this “new service” for our users…

…and so here we are:  the openSUSE Heroes team is pleased to announce that keyserver.opensuse.org is up and running as public GPG keyserver. We are of course also part of the official keyserver pool, which means that some people might already noticed us, as they got redirected to our server with their requests. (And for those who are interested to setup their own SKS keyserver: we have also written a nice monitoring plugin that helps you keeping an eye on the pool status of your machine and the ones of your peers.)

The server may be accessed either via it’s Web interface (please ping the Heroes if you want to improve it) or via the openPGP HTTP keyserver protocol (HKP), which is normally used by GPG clients.
Try it out by calling something like:

gpg --keyserver keyserver.opensuse.org --search-keys 0xF62B7584

on the command line, or enhance your personal GPG configuration file ~/.gnupg/gpg.conf with:

keyserver hkp://keyserver.opensuse.org

and work as before with your new, preferred GPG keyserver as standard. What more can we say, except “have fun en-/de-crypting your data!”

openSUSE Heroes meeting, day 2

December 3rd, 2016 by

After a long, but exciting first day, we even managed to get some sleep before we started again and discussed the whole morning about our policies and other stuff that is now updated in the openSUSE wiki. After that, we went out for a nice lunch…

openSUSE Heroes out for lunch.

openSUSE Heroes out for lunch.

…before we started the discussion about some other topics on our list.

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openSUSE Heroes meeting, day 1

December 2nd, 2016 by

Some of the openSUSE Heroes decided during the last openSUSE Conference that it’s time for more face to face meetings to “get things done” and “work together”…

Picture from the meeting with some openSUSE Heroes discussing

Picture from the meeting with some openSUSE Heroes discussing

So starting today, some openSUSE Heroes started to spend the first December weekend in the SUSE Headquarter in Nuremberg. And they really have a lot to do, as you might imagine! That might be the reason why some of them started at 02:00 in the night to arrive at 07:00 in Nuremberg…

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MJ Technology Tablet has openSUSE, Dual Boot

November 22nd, 2016 by

It’s official; the Warrior Tablet made by MJ Technology and powered by openSUSE is ready for the world; now it just needs funding through an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

Avid Linux users can reap the benefits of four 10.1” Linux tablets offered by MJ Techology. The specifications of the four tablets vary in power and cost, but all come with the power of Linux and openSUSE at the core.

“MJ Technology, a leader in affordable cutting edge tech, is pleased to introduce the MJ Technology Warrior series tablets powered by openSUSE,” said Mark Jun, CEO for MJ Technology.

The preinstalled image on the Warrior Tablet Series is GNOME on openSUSE Leap, but users are welcome to change/reinstall/use Tumbleweed/etc. Any hardware support will be upstream via the Open Build Service and will not impede different usage patterns, so there is no lock-in, which gives the user choice.

The tablets offer dual boot for Windows 10 or use openSUSE Leap as a sole operating system for personal use. System administrators needing to manage multiple servers remotely can fulfill needs with the World’s First actual Made-for-Linux x86/x64 Tablet.

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