Home Home
Sign up | Login

openSUSE announces first round of accepted proposals

May 2nd, 2016 by

oscfinalThe first round of proposals for the openSUSE Conference have been accepted and people who submitted a call for papers should log-in to events.opensuse.org and check to see if their talk has been accepted as part of the first round of proposals.

For proposals that have been accepted, users should confirm their proposal as soon as possible and also register for the conference if they had not done so already.

About 20 proposals have been confirmed, but there are about 45 proposals from the first round proposals that need to be confirmed.

There will be a second round of accepted proposals announced next week.

Tumbleweed gets glibc 2.23

April 29th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-blackThere has not been a new snapshot for openSUSE Tumbleweed for the past week, and it has been a couple weeks since the last time it was discussed on news.opensuse.org.

A new snapshot of Tumbleweed arrived today and the reason for not having one the past week is that the entire rolling release distribution was rebuilt on the Open Build Service and thoroughly tested by openQA.

Snapshot 20160422 updated glibc to version 2.23 and libvirt to 1.3.3. The libraries provide new compatibility and remove some obsolete functions. Several patches were removed from glibc and libvirt. Libvirt’s update also improved support for ppc64.

GCC 5 upgraded to version 5.3.1+r234891 and kernel-firmware updated to 20160412.

Php7 has been added and is available in the the repositories.

Other updates of interest are to openssl with new patches from SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 and cmake 3.5.2. YaST had several updates with yast2 upgrading to 3.1.185, yast2-vm upgrading to 3.1.26, and yast2-bootloader upgrading to 3.1.176 among others YaST updates.

Tumbleweed users can expect Qt 5.6 to make it in a snapshot within the next few weeks and will more than likely be available after the next YaST sprint.

openSUSE announces Community Release Team

April 28th, 2016 by

Leap-greenThe openSUSE Board announced today a call to action for a Community Release Team to assist with tasks associated to the development of the next Leap version 42.2.

The announcement was made in an email to the project’s development mailing list opensuse-factory (at) opensuse.org.

“In the past, these tasks were… distributed among the SUSE employed openSUSE team, which tried to incorporate community and in the end made sure that everything gets done,” wrote Tomáš Chvátal, a newly elected board member.

Contributors can help Leap’s new release manager Ludwig Nussel with a variety of tasks associated with the development of 42.2, but the opportunities for contributing are more than just development.

“We would like the community to be directly responsible for ensuring these tasks get carried out,” Chvátal wrote. “To accomplish this we intend to create a full team of people taking care about what needs to be done for the release. We expect the people in this Community Release Team to be the ones responsible for the tasks in their respective areas of responsibility.”

The tasks are split into several areas like marketing, design, infrastructure, documentation, translations and quality assurance.

Tasks for marketing include creating and following a marketing plan and taking care of social media among other things. Design tasks include making sure the desktops are consistently branded and the the look and feel is consistent. Infrastructure tasks include making sure critical infrastructure works.

The documentation tasks include updating content on the wiki and ensuring release notes are updated. Translations for 42.2 will be needed and QA tasks include creating a test plan for milestones, monitoring bugzilla and escalating important regressions to the release manager.

People interested in joining the Community Release Team should contact the board and Nussel.

A link to the action items from the last release can be found at http://tinyurl.com/grg5szf and volunteers are welcomed to expand the tasks.

openSUSE to Mentor Six Google Summer of Code Students

April 25th, 2016 by

Google made an announcement April 22 that 1,206 students were selected for the Google Summer of Code and six of those students will be mentored through the openSUSE Project, which is one of 178 mentoring organizations in this year’s GSoC.

The six university students will spend their summer break writing code and learning about open source developments through six projects with the openSUSE Project while earning money through Google’s international program.

“I believe that one of the most important tasks for a Free Software hacker is to bring new people with new perspectives, backgrounds and fresh ideas into the community,” said Hendrik Vogelsang, who is one of the mentors for the openSUSE Project. “GSoC provides the perfect opportunity for a project like openSUSE to build new relationships with students from all over the world.”

Those new relationships and fresh ideas will develop within six projects for openSUSE, which are titled Alternatives YaST Module, Enhancing visitor experience of OSEM, Implementing Ticket payment feature for OSEM, Improve One-Click Installer, Improve the UI of Portus and Port Jangouts from AngularJS 1.4.

Students wrote more than 20 project proposals to participate with openSUSE as a mentoring organization. A list of available project that were available to students can be viewed at 101.opensuse.org.

The next phase of GSoC will be the Community Bonding phase and the students will begin working on the projects May 23. The students will have a mid-term evaluation between June 20 – 27 and will submit their code for evaluation between August 15 -23.

Google Summer of Code is open to post-secondary students, age 18 and older in most countries.

Planning on attending the openSUSE Conference?

April 20th, 2016 by

What to know

openSUSE Conference CrowdThe openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg, Germany, June 22 – 26 is just nine weeks away and attendee might want to start planning their trip to this year’s conference.

With a pre-conference party planned for June 21 at the Kater Murr at 7 p.m., attendees might want to consider arriving on June 21; arriving a day before the conference is a good idea.

The conference will begin at 10 a.m. on June 22, which should give people time to recovery either jet lag or the pre-conference party.

People who take the train will arrive in downtown Nuremberg. People coming in on a flight can go downtown using the subway (U-Bahn) from the airport. U2 is the train that goes too and from downtown (Hauptbahnhof).

People who plan on driving to Nuremberg will find plenty of parking garages around the city. Parking at the Z Bau is free.

Travel Support Program

People who plan on using the Travel Support Program can start submitting their requests now via Connect and need to have it submitted six weeks before the start of oSC16. (May 9 at the latest).

Learn more about the Travel Support Program and be informed of the policies to make your process easy and to understand the requirements for receiving support funds.

Read the rest of this entry »

Free software equalizes economic segregation in schools

April 15th, 2016 by

William Shakespeare once wrote that “it is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.” Fine words from an educated and knowledgeable man who was born privileged, but his words hold true that our destiny is not predetermined.

Dan Rather, who is just as poetic with his words, had a similar message last week we when he spoke at the National School Board Association Conference in Boston.

I, along with other members of the openSUSE community, were fortunate enough to attend Rather’s keynote speech. Rather, who came from a small farming town in Texas and whose father was a ditch digger, credits self-determination, his wife and great teachers, who believe and care about students, as a key to his prosperity.

What I also learned at this school boards conference is that unlike other nations, school budgets in the United States have a significant amount of funding based on local property tax, which creates economic segregation in schools.

Read the rest of this entry »

Update on Tumbleweed, Conference

April 6th, 2016 by


Plasma 5.6  and Qt 5.6 have yet to make it in a Tumbleweed snapshot, but the packages are are in staging and the latter will likely arrive after Plasma 5.6. Until then, there are four snapshots the have been released since the last update.

Snapshot 20160405 provided and update to gtk3 to 3.20.2, which provided a fix for a blue background in emacs. Wine updated to 1.9.7 providing improvements to the WebServices reader and drag and drop. Xf86-video-intel was also in the snapshot and backported several patches.

Snapshot 20160404 provided a Btrfsprogs update to 4.5.1 from 4.4.1 and perl-bootloader updated to .911 with the subpackage YAML. Mercurial updated to it’s latest version 3.7.3 and yast2-sound updated to 3.1.9 fixing a dependency on yast2.

Snapshot 20160401 Updates to freetype2 and dolphin and the 20160331 snapshot made an update to GCC 5 and xfsprogs updated to 4.5.

openSUSE Conference

Read the rest of this entry »

Update on openSUSE Conference

March 31st, 2016 by

oscfinalThere are 15 more days to submit a proposal for the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg June 22 – 26, so I would like to provide an update to the community about the conference.

As you might already be aware, there will be SaltStack, ownCloud, Kolab and SUSE Labs summits during the conference and we also plan on having a program for kids on Saturday, June 25.

The planning of the conference is coming along well. There will be a pre-conference party at the Kater Murr starting at 7 p.m. June 21. There will be plenty of entertainment during the week as well.

Everyday, there will be a keynote. The keynote speakers who have confirmed are Norman Fraser, Ph.D., who is the CEO of SoftIron, Frank Karlitschek from ownCloud, and Michael Miller, President of Strategy, Alliances & Marketing for SUSE. We will have one more keynote as well, but we have not confirmed it yet.

The conference page has a list of hotels that are recommended, so if you haven’t booked your hotel, take a look at the list.

The T-Shirt Design Contest ends on April 2 and during our next organizing meeting, we will announce the winner of the contest and start getting the T-Shirts printed for the conference. Thank you to all the people who have submitted a design. There is still two days left to submit a design.

We have several sponsors for this year’s conference and we are looking forward to seeing everyone there.

openSUSE will have HackWeek the week following the conference, but it will kick off on Friday, June 24 and continue into the next week, so if you feel like hanging around Nuremberg for HackWeek, we will have a place for you to Hack at the SUSE Headquarters from June 27 to July 1. Participate in one of the projects listed or make one on the website.

Visas

If you plan on attending the conference from a non-European Union country, please view the requirements for entering the country.

You may be required to visit an embassy and have a formed signed to receive a travel visa. Email ddemaio@suse.com if you need about attending oSC16.

GNOME 3.20 coming real soon to Tumbleweed

March 30th, 2016 by


openSUSE Tumbleweed had some significant changes this past week with KDE Applications updating to version 15.12.3, which includes Long Term Support version of KDE Development Platform 4.14.18, and zypper updating to 1.13, but what is likely the biggest news is GNOME 3.20 is on the verge of being released.

Tumbleweed users might be using the latest GNOME release that has been thoroughly tested by openQA by this evening.

Tumbleweed-black

Arriving in GNOME 3.20 is a new cross-distro framework for building and distributing desktop applications with Builder and XDG-Apps. Wayland is available with 3.20, but not as the default. To try it out, select GNOME on Wayland from the gear menu on the login screen. The release of 3.20 is also a big release for GTK+, which provides more flexibility and power to theme authors.

Tumbleweed’s 20160326 snapshot provided a some new feature outside of GNOME 3.20’s new features as well.

The network manager has a new feature to determine if you are online. The network manager communicates with conncheck.opensuse.org to determine if a TW user has connectivity. To disable the feature, Tumbleweed users will need the NetworkManager-branding-upstream package.

Other News

openSUSE has been steadily transitioning its translations to Weblate, which just deployed version 2.5. If anyone would like to contribute to the openSUSE Project by translating release notes and other information about openSUSE and the project’s efforts, Weblate is translations made easy with a simple dashboard and progress bar to let people easily know where they can help with the project. There are even some additional tools being developed for Weblate by the openSUSE community.

The openSUSE is looking for a maintainer to help support 32-bit architecture for Tumbleweed. If anyone in the community is interested, email opensuse-factory@opensuse.org or join #opensuse-factory on IRC.

Python 3.5.1 coming in Tumbleweed snapshot

March 9th, 2016 by

Tumbleweed-blackFour snapshots released this week provided plenty of new packages for openSUSE Tumbleweed users, but what is coming in a future snapshot is what has people excited.

Python 3.5.1 and Linux Kernel 4.4.4 are expected to be updated this week in Tumbleweed snapshots.

Plasma 5.5.5 released earlier this week in snapshot 20160303 also has people excited.

Snapshot 20160304 provided updates for YaST, Kiwi and perl-bootloader. Snapshot 20160305 provided updated packages for DigiKam and systemd rpm macros. Snapshot 20160307 had the most diverse updates to grub2, libzypp, Plasma Frameworks, xen and Samba.

In other news related to the project, Ludwig Nussel, who is the new release manager for openSUSE Leap, is drafting a release schedule for Leap 42.2 and is expected to brief that at the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg this June.