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openSUSE Kubic Moves in a New Direction

August 9th, 2018 by

Dear Community,

It has been more than a year since the openSUSE community started the Kubic Project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and share with you all our plans for the future.

A stable base for the future

Much of our success has been in the area generally referred to as **MicroOS**, the part of the Kubic stack that provides a stable operating system that is **atomicly updated** for running containers.

Not only is Kubic MicroOS now a fully integrated part of the openSUSE Tumbleweed release process, but our Transactional Update stack has also been ported to regular openSUSE Tumbleweed and Leap.

Based on the community’s feedback, the new System Role has been further refined and now includes fully automated updates out of the box.

This collaboration is continuing, with many minor changes to the regular openSUSE installation process coming soon based on lessons learned with tuning the installation process in Kubic.

Reviewing our initial premise

We haven’t just been busy on the basesystem. Our efforts with Rootless Containers continue, and you can now use the “Docker-alternative” Podman CRI-O in both Kubic and regular openSUSE. But when considering the Initial Premise of the Kubic project, it’s probably safe to say we’re not where we hoped to be by now.

Read the rest of this entry »

openSUSE Leap 42.3 End of Life is Extended

August 8th, 2018 by

The usual lifetime of openSUSE Leap minor versions have traditionally received updates for about 18 months, but the minor version of Leap 42.3 is being extended.

The last minor version of the Leap 42 series was scheduled to be maintained until January 2019, but that has changed thanks to SUSE committing to additional months of maintenance and security updates. Leap 42.3 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack (SP) 3  and SUSE has agreed to keep publishing updates for Leap 42.3 until June 2019.

This means the extended End of Life for Leap 42.3 will increase the total lifetime of the Leap 42 series to 44 months.

Users of the openSUSE Leap 42 series are encouraged to use the additional months to prepare the upgrade to Leap 15, which was released in May.

Those who can’t migrate production servers to the new major version in time may want to take a (commercial) SLE subscription into consideration, which provides even a longer lifecycle. The proximity of Leap 42’s base system to SLE 12 keeps the technical effort to migrate workflows from Leap to SLE low.

 

Tumbleweed Gets Python Setuptools 40.0, New Versions of Frameworks, Applications

July 26th, 2018 by

Several packages were updated in openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week and developers will notice the snapshots are reported to be extremely stable.

Wireshark, sysdig, GNOME’s evolution, KDE’s Frameworks and Applications, Ceph, vim and python-setuptools were just a few of the many packages that arrived in Tumbleweed this week.

Wireshark 2.6.2 received several Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) updates in snapshot 20180723, which included a HTTP2 dissector crash. The sysdig tool for deep system visibility with native support for containers had a minor update to 0.22.0 and added support for addional custom container types alongside Docker. Configurable text editor vim was updated to version 8.1.0200 and poppler 0.66.0 fixed compilations with some strict compilers when rendering PDFs. Google’s RE2 package, which is fast, safe, thread-friendly alternative to backtracking regular expression engines like those used in PCRE, Perl, and Python, simplified the spec file and fixed a Deterministic Finite Automaton (DFA) out of memory error. Cups-filters 1.20.4 made some ipp and ipps changes and also removed support for hardware-implemented reversing of page order in PostScript printers for some rare printers. Read the rest of this entry »

GSoC Half Way Through

July 20th, 2018 by

As you may already know, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. Our students started working already two months ago. Ankush, Liana and Matheus have passed the two evaluations successfully and they are busy hacking to finish their projects. Go on reading to find out what they have to say about their experience, their projects and the missing work for the few more weeks. 😀

Ankush Malik

Ankush is improving people collaboration in the Hackweek tool and he has already made many great contributions like the emoticons, similar project section and notifications features. In fact, the Hackweek 17 was just last week, so in the last days a lot of people have already been using these great new features. There were a lot of good comments about his work! :cupid: and we also received a lot of feedback, as you can for example see in the issues list.

But even more important than all the functionality, is all Ankush is learning while coding and working with his mentors and the openSUSE community, such as working with AJAX in Ruby on Rails, good coding practices and better coding style.

The last part of his project will include some more new features. If you want to find out more about his project and the challenges that Ankush expects to have, read his interesting blog post:

https://medium.com/@ankushmalik631/how-my-gsoc-project-is-going-4942614132a2

Hackweek tool screenshot

Xu Liana

Liana is working on integrating Cloud Pinyin (the most popular input method in China) on ibus-libpinyin. For her, GSoC is being an enjoyable learning process full of challenges. With the help of her mentors she has learnt about autotools and she builds now her code without graphical build tools. 💪 For the few more weeks, she plans to learn about algorithmics that are useful for the project and, after finish the coding part, she would like to go deeper in the fundamentals of compiling. Read it from her owns word in her blog post:

https://liana.hillwoodhome.net/2018/07/14/the-first-half-of-the-project-during-gsoc-libpinyin

Matheus de Sousa Bernardo

Matheus is working in Trollolo, a cli-tool which helps teams using Trello to organize their work. He has been mainly focused on the restructuring of commands and the incomplete backup feature. The discussion with his mentors made him take different implementation paths than the ones he had in mind at the beginning, learning the importance of keeping things simple. It has been complicated for Matheus to find time for both the GSoC project and his university duties. But he still has some more weeks to implement the more challenging feature, the automation of Trollolo! 💥

Check his blog post with more details about the project: https://matheussbernardo.me/gsoc/2018/07/08/midterm

 

I hope you enjoyed reading about the work and experiences of the openSUSE students and mentors. Keep tuned as there are still some more hacking weeks and the students will write a last blog post summarizing their GSoC experience. 😉

 


The blog post’s text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019: Call for Host

July 6th, 2018 by

What is The Different?

Starting this year, openSUSE.Asia organization committee are accepting proposals earlier for better preparation and well organized summit. This rule will be also applied for future summits. The guides for openSUSE.Asia Summit can be reached at https://en.opensuse.org/Portal:Asia_Summit

The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia. The event focuses primarily on the openSUSE distribution, its applications for personal and enterprise use, and open source culture. It brings together the openSUSE community in Asia, providing a forum for users, developers, foundation leaders, governments and businesses to discuss the present technology and future developments.

The Summit’s preference is to find new locations each year as we spread openSUSE throughout Asia, and we are looking for local organizers to rise to the challenge of organizing an excellent openSUSE event. We need individuals and communities to get together and organize a successful openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia organization committee assists throughout the process.

2018 Summits

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 will be held in Taipei, Taiwan. You can learn more about former openSUSE.Asia Summit at the following websites:

Proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019

For those of you who are interested in hosting the next openSUSE.Asia Summit, you are invited to submit a formal proposal to the openSUSE.Asia organization committee and join this year summit. The deadlines for the proposals are as the following:

  • July 31: Registration on the host candidates
  • September 10th: Deadline of Submission of the proposals
  • October 5th: Announcement of the result

The registration only requires the informal introduction of the organizers and the city or the country where the summit will take place. Please e-mail your proposals to both opensuse-summit@opensuse.org and opensuseasia-summit@googlegroups.com. Without the registration, you cannot submit your proposal.

We will invite you to our regular online meetings so that you can understand how the summit is organized. Furthermore, we are going to ask you to show your proposals at the closing session if you attend the next summit in Taipei.

The submitted proposals are to be reviewed by the organization committee, and one of them is to be selected by vote. The committee might have additional questions and requests during the review.

Things to be Written in Your Proposals

The conference will require the availability of facilities for around a weekend, during the latter half of 2019. Final event dates should avoid other major free software conferences or other events that may have conflict (e.g., Open Source Summit Europe) and will be confirmed together with other openSUSE teams who might get involved.

Key points proposals should consider, and what will be taken into account when deciding among candidates, are:

  1. Introduction
  2. Objectives
  3. Local organizers
    • Proposed organizing committee
    • Proposed supporting organizations
  4. Expected dates
  5. Venue
    • Rooms
    • Travel information and travel support
    • Food and accommodation
    • T-shirt
  6. Milestones until the summit
  7. Activities and schedule
    • Registration
    • Hack-fest (This is an option)
    • Conference
    • Keynote
    • Dinner and party
  8. Expectations and marketing
  9. Budget Estimation
    • Conference Venue
    • Marketing materials(T-shirts,banner,badge,posters, etc.)
    • Tea break, Lunch, Dinner
    • Travel subsidy and accommodation
    • Miscellaneous(Think about 10% uplift to have more buffer)
  10. Potential sponsors & media partners
  11. Conclusion

Feel free to contact opensuse-summit@opensuse.org if you have any questions. If this excites you enough, but you are still not sure, we should talk and see if we can solve your doubts. Please help to spread the words and we are looking forward to hearing from you soon!

 

Krita, GNOME Builder, FFmpeg Get Updates in Tumbleweed

July 5th, 2018 by

The four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week are trending quite stable as new major version packages have been updated this week.

Among the packages updates this week were FFmpeg, KDE Plasma, GNOME Builder and Krita along with a kernel update.

The most recent snapshot, 20180702, put out the first update ffmpeg 4.0 with a refresh of patches and an enablement for ffnvcodec when building with NVIDIA support. The snapshot brought about another 4.0 version with checkmedia upgrading from 3.8 to the new 4.0 version. The tools and libraries package to work with Extensible Firmware Interface variables, efivar, had a major update as well and adjusted its libefiboot-export-disk_get_partition_info.patch to work with the new 36 version. That wasn’t the last major version update either. The package for userspace components for the Linux Kernel‘s drivers/infiniband subsystem, rdma-core, updated to version 18.1; the new major version fixed compilations with recent glibc. Among the other packages in the snapshot there were updated were spec-cleaner 1.1.0, brotli 1.0.5 and System Security Services Daemon (sssd) 1.16.2.

The 20180701 snapshot brough Plasma 5.13.2. The release added a week’s worth of new translations and fixes from KDE‘s contributors. There were also updates to several YaST packages and libstorage-ng 3.3.312 removed an unused and obsolete file. Konversation 1.7.5 dropped a patch and fixed building against Qt 5.11. The lightweight image viewer for the Xfce desktop ristretto 0.8.3 had multiple fixes including a fix for GLib-GObject-CRITICAL in the directory monitoring code.

Snapshots from the end of last month included snapshot 20180629 and 20180628. Snapshot 20180629 improved the performance of the stroke layer style with an update to the open source painting program krita 4.0.4. The testsuite package spec-cleaner was updated in this snapshot as well to version 1.0.9, which dropped support of python 2, and there were bug fixes for Qt 5.11 with the libqt5-qttranslations and libqt5-qtvirtualkeyboard package updates to 5.11.1. Snapshot 20180628 updated the Linux Kernel to 4.17.3, which had multiple fixes for the btrfs filesystem and deleted some stacktrace patches. The gnome-builder package made the editor more reliable to restores a cursor position and fixed for a number of crashers and potential for data loss with the 3.28.3 update.

Packages updated in previous snapshots last month were were GCC 8.1.1, KDE Applications 18.04.2, KDE Frameworks 5.47.0 and PulseAudio 12.0. Release manager Dominique Leuenberger summarized the updates in his weekly review and also explained that even though FFmpeg 4.0 was updates, FFmpeg 3.x is still available in the main repo, but will eventually be be phased out. All the snapshots in the past few weeks have been rated as moderate to stable in the Tumbleweed review tool. Snapshot 20180702 is currently trending as stable with a 91 percent rating.

Dates, Location set for openSUSE Conference 2019

June 25th, 2018 by

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the location and dates for the 2019 openSUSE Conference.

The openSUSE Conference 2019 will return to the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, and be Friday, May 24, through Sunday, May 26.

Planning for the 2019 conference will begin this summer and community members are encouraged to take part in the planning of the conference through the organizing team. The openSUSE Board proposed the idea of having organizing team for openSUSE Conferences last month at oSC18. An email about the organizing team was sent out to the openSUSE-Project mailing list.

Developing the organizing team should help with the planning of future openSUSE Conferences as the project looks expand the conferences to more locations throughout Europe. Both oSC16 and oSC17 were in Nuremberg and oSC18 was in Prague, Czech Republic, last month.

Anyone who is interested in helping to organize oSC19 should email me ddemaio (@) opensuse.org.

Tumbleweed Delivers New Kernel, Applications, Plasma, libvirt

June 20th, 2018 by

The past week brought a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots and a bunch of new features and improvements for KDE users.

Snapshot 20180618 updated just a few packages to include an updated GNU Compiler Collection 7, which fixes support for 32-bit AddressSanitizer with glibc 2.27+. Both perl-File-ShareDir and python-numpy were the other two packages that gave users minor fixes.

The snapshots earlier in the week were more KDE centric. Snapshot 20180615 delivered KDE Applications 18.04.2. The updated applications focused on bugfixes, improvements and translations for Dolphin, Gwenview, KGpg, Kig, Konsole, Lokalize, Okular and many more. KGpg no longer fails to decrypt messages without a version header and image with Gwenview can now be redone after undoing them. The Linux Kernel jumped from 4.16.12 to 4.17.1 and fixed some btrfs and KVM issues. The newer kernel also ported an arm fix for HDMI output routing and fixed an atomic sequence handling with spi-nor and intel-spi. The hwinfo package tried a more aggressive way to catch all usb platform controllers with the 21.55 version. Libvirt 4.4.0 added support for migration of Virtual Machines with non-shared storage over Thread-Local Storage (TLS) and introduced a new virDomainDetachDevice Alias. Lenovo, HP and Dell tablets gaining greater support with the updated libwacom 0.30  package. Add support for PostgreSQL-style UPSERT were made available with sqlite3  3.24.0. Other tools like mercurial 4.6.1, snapper 0.5.5 were also updated in the snapshot.

Tumbleweed users started to receive the updates to KDE Applications 18.04.2 in snapshot 20180613, but the update to Plasma 5.13 was what caught most users’ attention. The KDE Community spent a considerable amount of time optimising the startup and minimising memory usage, which provided a faster time-to-desktop and better runtime performance while using less memory consumption. Plasma 5.13 has a new system settings redesign, a new look and more features with its software and addon installer Discover. Two other notable changes in the 20180613 snapshot were updates to ceph 13.2, which fixed python3 loading module, and an update of the head branch to GCC8. Mesa 18.1.1 and perl-Image-ExifTool 11.00 were also updated in the snapshot.

openSUSE Releases Leap 15 Images for Raspberry Pi, Armv7 Devices

June 14th, 2018 by

The release of openSUSE Leap 15 two weeks ago is following up with its Build to Scale theme by offering images for Raspberry Pis, Beagle Boards, Arndale board, CuBox-i computers, OLinuXino and more.

openSUSE has plenty of supported arm boards to allow makers to simply create. openSUSE is providing makers the tools to start, run and grow a project on micro devices to large hardware.

The new, fresh and hardened code base that supports modern hardware is stable and offers a full scope of deployments.

Makers can leverage openSUSE Leap 15 images for aarch64 and Armv7 on Internet of Things (IoT) and embedded devices. Since openSUSE Leap 15 shares a common core  SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources, makers who find success with a project or device can more comfortably transition to an enterprise product in the future should certifications become a requirement. Currently, the only IoT platform supported by SLE is the Raspberry Pi 3. However, there is no current supported migration from Leap 15 to SLE 15 with the Raspberry Pi. The barrier to entry in the IoT/embedded markets are lowered when a developer starts a project with Leap 15. Plus, the many supported arm boards can help developers circumnavigate future obstacles that might hinder project’s growth in a developing market.

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GSoC Blog: openSUSE Conference 2018

June 6th, 2018 by

Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Matheus de Sousa Bernardo. Matheus is assisting with improving API and workflow of Trollolo, which is a cli-tool that helps teams using Trello to organize their work, as part of his Google Summer of Code project.