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New node.js LTS, GNU Debugger, libvirt Updates Arrive in Tumbleweed Snapshots

June 13th, 2019 by

The three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week updated some key packages for users of the rolling release.

One of those key packages was an update of the GNU Debugger, gdb 8.3, which was released in the 20190607 snapshot. The debugger enabled ada tests on ppc64le and riscv64; multitarget builds for riscv64 were also enabled. The snapshot also added unit test for Logical Volume Manager (LVM) over Modular Disk (MD) with the update of libstorage-ng 4.1.127. Several patches and bug fixes were applied with the update of libvirt 5.4.0, which also made an improvement to avoided unnecessary static linking that results in both the disk and memory footprint being reduced. Libvirt also introduced support for the md-clear CPUID bit. The python-libvirt-python 5.4.0 package added all new Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and constants in libvirt 5.4.0. Text editor vim 8.1.1467 had multiple fixes, but the Tumbleweed snapshot introduced some new bugs and is currently trending at an 86 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

The two previous snapshots recorded an exceptional stable rating of 98 according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190606 updated just two packages. The nodejs10 package put out a new upstream Long-Term-Support (LTS) version with nodejs10 10.16.0, which upgraded upgrade openssl sources to 1.1.1b and libuv to 1.28.0. The other package update in the snapshot was xfdesktop 4.12.5; the package for the Xfce 4 Desktop Environment fixed icon sizes in settings, reset the desktop icon order and fixed a timer leak.

The 20190605 snapshot had three packages updated. Linux Kernel 5.1.7 had some fixes pertaining to Btrfs like fixing the in-core state with a storage device between ranged fsync and writeback of adjacent ranges. The kernel update also removed dependencies with the arch_timer driver internals for the arm architecture and added Ice Lake support for Intel’s x86 power mode or c-state. Time Zones were updated with the libical 3.0.5 package and the libinput 1.13.2 package made some changes for Wacom touchpads and Apple bluetooth touchpad.

Release manager Dominique Leuenberger wrote a review of the previous two weeks and stated that openssl 1.1.1c, Texlive 2019, KDE Plasma 5.16, Qt 5.13, LLVM 8, swig 4.0, and cmake 3.14 were all progressing in the staging projects and will be released soon in upcoming Tumbleweed snapshots.

People of openSUSE: Stasiek Michalski

June 7th, 2019 by

Introduction

I’m LCP, or Stasiek if you can pronounce that. Just a 20 years old guy from Poland who spends way too much time in front of computers. That’s how all my potted plants end up dead.

My Journey

I’ve been using computers for as long as I can remember, playing Solitaire, The Settlers, and other simple DOS games, because that’s what my parents and grandma liked to play. I started with Win95, 98, and 2000, before learning about Linux.

My interest in design was sparked by the original iPhone icons, which I loved. In contrast with my hatred toward the Faenza icon theme, both have fairly similar style yet widely different results. That’s how I began exploring and learned from there.

Correspondingly, my Linux journey started back in 2007 when my dad showed me Ubuntu, and just like what I did with Windows 2000 before, my pastime became installing and reinstalling Linux alongside Windows in different configurations (I apparently was consumed by the concept of installation and configuration, which might explain my YaST obsession?).

Later in 2010, I had a tough time with a machine that wouldn’t take any distro with the exception of openSUSE (although it did end up with a few Linuxrc errors). Besides, I really liked its GNOME 2 config back then; it was really user friendly yet powerful. I gave KDE a shot but to this day I never really liked it.

Contributing, how it all started…

My first contribution was because of my consistent and annoying complaining to Richard Brown on Linux Gaming Discord about the sorrow state of artwork in Tumbleweed. I didn’t like anything there. I, it seemed too dark, too boring; stuff was barely visible due to contrast issues. He pointed me to contribute and make it better then, so I did. Around the same time me and some of other people from Linux Gaming Discord created the openSUSE Discord, and I reused some assets from the Discord to create the new branding.

Even though my main focus has been artwork, I also take part in some coding, translations, and obviously testing. I enjoy all of it in general. It is a great way to make computing easier and more pleasant for other less experienced users.

Actually, to me, my most valuable contribution has been encouraging people to use openSUSE and contribute to it, while doing my best to help them out when needed. Otherwise, I wouldn’t have been able to provide anything on my own because I rely on community to actively help me out with their judgment; just as I do help them out with mine.

Side projects

Outside of openSUSE I also work on Pixelfed, some Discord distros collaboration (artwork for Fedora and Gentoo discords on top of openSUSE one) and more recently been working on User Interface (UI) design for SuperTuxKart and some custom tiles for OpenSkyscraper in order to replace injecting the EXE file (but gamedev is hard, you know).

One thing that needs more attention in openSUSE?

Libyui-gtk needs more attention. It’s a library that was originally developed for YaST then got dropped, but Manatools still heavily depends on it. Any contribution to the development is encouraged and will help bring it back home.

Gaming

I don’t play as often as I used to because I’m busy contributing, but I love Minecraft, The Settlers 2 and Solitaire Spider, which its terminal version was my very first open source software project.

Something I can talk about for hours

Recently, it’s been radio buttons. The design we use in UIs doesn’t make much sense compared to the real life equivalent, as opposed to basically every other form element. But at the same time we can’t do much about it… now that people got used to this one. Plus, I don’t see a proper replacement.

A lie about myself

I like dogs.

I’d like to add

Please contribute to https://github.com/openSUSE/branding/issues/93, every voice matters!

Mesa, VirtualBox, Ceph, NetworkManager Packages Update in Tumbleweed

June 6th, 2019 by

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots have been released in the first four days of June, which bring several minor package updates to the rolling release.

The 20190604 snapshot brought babl  0.1.64, which provided some code consistency, gitlab Continuous Integration (CI), autotools and meson build improvements. An accident in naming caused the 0.3.2 version of bubblewrap to become version 0.3.3. However, bubblewrap 0.3.3. did address a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE), provided a few smaller fixes and added the JSON Application Programming Interface (API) that allows reading the inner process exit code. GNU Compiler Collection 8 had some updates that included a couple patches with one that makes builds without profiling reproducible. Generic Graphics Library gegl 0.4.16 also added gitlab CI and uses a custom allocator for tile data, which aligns data and groups allocations in blocks; this was achieved on Linux by using the GNU extension malloc_trim to permit forcing invocation of the glibc malloc/free allocators garbage collection function. Oracle’ virtualbox 6.0.8 had a minor maintenance release that fixed a crash when powering off a Virtual Machine without a graphics controller and xorg-x11-server 1.20.5 fixed some input. The snapshot is currently trending at a 96 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot 20190603 updated Mesa and Mesa-drivers to version 19.0.5 and took care of some core code and drivers. NetworkManager 1.16.2 fixed some wrong permissions of the /var/lib/NetworkManager/secret_key file. Ceph’s minor version update disabled Link Time Optimisation in spec when being used. GNOME 3.32.2 had several package updates and fixes including the fix of a regression that caused the fonts category to go missing. Tumbleweed skipped over the 1.3.0 series of Flatpak directly to version 1.4.0. The major changes since 1.2.4 is the improved I/O use for system-installed applications, and the new format for pre-configured remotes. Glib2 2.60.3 updated translations and provided various fixes to small key/value support in GHashTable. Scripting language php7 7.3.6 added a missing curl_version and fixed several other bugs. The snapshot is currently trending at a 95 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

The snapshot that started out the month, 20190601, update the Linux Kernel to 5.1.5 that fixed a data loss bug. Flatpak-builder 1.0.7 fixed some details in how to create platform commits to fix font cache mtime issues. Among the other package updates in the snapshot were GNOME’s image viewer gthumb 3.8.0, ibus-libpinyin 1.11.1, libopenmpt 0.4.5, qalculate 3.2.0, rdesktop 1.8.6, which fixed the protocol code handling new licenses, and yast2-support 4.1.1. The snapshot is currently trending at a 90 rating, according to the snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE Community Releases Leap 15.1 Version

May 22nd, 2019 by

Leap 15.1 Supports More Hardware, Drivers, Enhances Installation

EN / CA / DE / FR / IT / ES / JA / NL / PL / ZH / ZH-TW

22/05/2019

NUREMBERG, Germany – Today’s release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings professional users, entrepreneurs and Independent Software Vendors updated support for modern hardware.

The release of Leap 15.1 improves YaST functionality and the installer.

“Continuity and stability are what we are providing users with Leap 15.1,” said Haris Sehic, a member of the openSUSE community. “With Leap 15, we have introduced a huge number of new features and innovations in security, performance and tool/desktop area. Having in mind how stable, efficient and reliable Leap has become, with this release, we managed to keep the level of quality to the point that our private and Small Business users can, actually more than ever, profit from the enterprise background of an openSUSE Linux Distribution. Let’s continue to have a lot of fun!”

Leap releases are scalable and both the desktop and server are equally important for professional’s workloads, which is reflected in the installation menu as well as the amount of packages Leap offers and hardware it supports. Leap is well suited and prepared for usage as a Virtual Machine (VM) or container guest, allowing professional users to efficiently run network services no matter whether it’s a single server or a data center.

Professional users, system administrators and developers can have confidence in the reliability of the Leap distribution based on its development process to deliver a modern, secure, maintained and highly tested distribution using the open-source build system unique to both SUSE and openSUSE, which is the Open Build Service, along with the automated testing of openQA.

What’s New

An entirely new graphics stack update is available for this stable community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution. Graphics hardware supported by the 4.19 Linux Kernel were backported for the release of Leap 15.1, which uses the 4.12 Linux Kernel and supports additional graphics drivers for Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and improved support for AMD Vega chipset.

GPU virtualization has become quite popular among vendors like AMD, Intel and Nvidia and Leap 15.1 helps to delivers these implementation and support solutions for virtualized and cloud environments.

Leap 15.1 will now use Network Manager by default for both laptops and desktops – previously only laptops defaulted to Network Manager. Server installations will continue to default to Wicked, the openSUSE advanced network configuration system. The release adds a few popular WiFi drivers for more modern wireless chipsets. A change that applies to both Wicked and Network Manager is that /etc/resolv.conf, yp.conf and some other files are a link to a file in /run and are managed by netconfig.

The management of system services in YaST has been revamped to take advantage of many of the features offered by systemd in that area.

Improved Setup and Configuration

Some of the improvements to YaST have made for better management of services. Firewalld can be managed in text mode. There is a new User Interface to manage Firewalld, including AutoYaST support/advancements. System administrators will have better control with Salt formulas in the yast2-configuration-management module, and management of SSH keys per user will make sysadmins tasks much more pleasant.

YaST comes with an improved Partitioner, that now can automatically format full disks without partition tables, create software MD RAIDs on top of full disks, create partitions within a software-defined MD RAID and many other combinations. AutoYaST also supports all these combinations. The work the YaST team has put into the setup and configuration tool has a better default partitioning proposal in several scenarios like those with small disks or systems with several disks making solutions easier for Linux professionals. Leap 15.1 brings new YaST icons developed by the community.

The YaST team worked hard on improving the 4k display (HiDPI) experience. HiDPI displays are now autodetected and the UI is auto-scaled giving the installer a beautifully crisp interface.

Security and Maintenance

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Stable Sailing For Tumbleweed Snapshots This Week

May 16th, 2019 by

Developers Can Make Use of GCC 9, QEMU 4, Wireshark 3

This week produced a smooth and rapid release of stable openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot as the rolling release produced a total of five stable or trending stable snapshots, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The production of snapshots provided both large and small package updates with GNU Compiler Collection 9, Wireshark 3.0.1, QEMU 4.0, KDE Applications 19.04.1, GNOME 3.32.2 and KDE Plasma 5.15.5 rounding out the largest package updates this week.

The latest Tumbleweed snapshot, 20190514, hailed in twenty recorded bug fixes for KDE Applications 19.04.1, which include improvements to Kontact, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Kdenlive, Spectacle and Umbrello. Among the highlighted fixes were a crash in KMail’s text sharing plugin that was fixed and regressions in the video editor Kdenlive were corrected. The Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (alsa) 1.1.9 dropped several patches and fixed a rate plugin for comparisons as well as added support for GCC’s LinkTimeOptimization. The VLC audio visual decoder package dav1d 0.3.1 provided arm optimization for Multiple Sequence Alignment Compressor (MSAC). The package that has the implementation of HTTP/2 and its header compression algorithm HPACK in C, nghttp2, fixed a compilation against modern LibreSSL in the 1.38.0 version update. Tcsh 6.21.00 ported patches and the 4.2.15 version of yast2-storage-ng worked on the partitioner to prevent edition of block devices that are part of a multi-device Btrfs. The snapshot is currently trending at a 96 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

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InfinityBook Pro 13 as an important part of the openSUSE reference tests

May 15th, 2019 by

openSUSE and TUXEDO Computers want to offer the best user experience

KÖNIGSBRUNN, Germany — The cooperation between TUXEDO Computers and the openSUSE project has existed since 2018. This has been very successful, so that the release team of openSUSE has received a permanent loan from TUXEDO Computers and has developed and further developed the new version Leap 15.1 on the InfinityBook Pro 13, which will be released soon.

The openSUSE project mainly uses the InfinityBook Pro 13 from the TUXEDO Computers range. It offers numerous configuration options and is characterized by its mobility, runtime, performance, quality and flexibility. The internal tests at openSUSE were consistently positive. Further information and benchmarks can be found in the current joint success story, which is available for download.

TUXEDO Computers at the openSUSE Conference 2019

24th to 26th of May 2019: openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany

From 24th to 26th of May 2019, TUXEDO Computers will be part of the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg/Germany. There, the hardware manufacturer from Königsbrunn near Augsburg/Germany will present a selection of current devices. The laptops can be viewed and tested here. Via the TUXEDO Computers online shop, more than 20 devices can be configured according to individual requirements and equipped, for example, with the Linux distribution openSUSE. The openSUSE conference in May is the annual openSUSE community event that brings people from all over the world together. Organized lectures, workshops and BoF sessions provide a setting for more informal meetings and hack sessions.

Further information and ticket can be found here: https://events.opensuse.org/conferences/oSC19

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Logo Competition

May 15th, 2019 by

Today, we will start a logo competition for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019, which is going to be held in Bali, Indonesia. A logo is an essential material for the successful summit. As you have seen, the former openSUSE.Asia summits have their unique logos reflecting the communities where the summit took place. Following tradition, we have logo competition to collect great logo for this year’s summit.

The competition is open now and ends on 15 June 2019. The organizing team will send “Geeko Mystery Box” as an appreciation for the best logo designed. This year, logo will be voted by openSUSE.Asia committee.

Deadline: 15 June 2019 UTC 13:00

Announcement Winner: 25 June 2019

The Rules of the Contest are as follows:

  • The logo should be licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 and allow everyone to use the logo without attribution (BY) if your work is used as the logo of openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019. Note that the attribution is going to be shown on the summit website.
  • Design must be original and should not include any third party materials.
  • Both monochromes and color formats are essential for submission.
  • Submissions must be in SVG format.
  • Design should reflect the openSUSE community in Asia.
  • The logo should avoid the following things:
    • Brand names or trademarks of any kind.
    • Illustrations that may consider inappropriate, offensive, hateful, tortuous, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
    • Sexually explicit or provocative images.
    • Violence or weapons.
    • Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use imagery.
    • Discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
    • Bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against groups or individuals
    • Religious, political, or nationalist imagery.
  • The logo should follow “openSUSE Project Trademark Guidelines” published at https://en.opensuse.org/File:OpenSUSE_Trademark_Guidelines.pdf
  • The branding guidelines will be helpful to design your logo (optional)
    https://opensuse.github.io/branding-guidelines/

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GNOME 3.32 Arrives in Month’s First Tumbleweed Snapshot

May 9th, 2019 by

This month has produced a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshot thus far and GNOME 3.32.1 was made available to Tumbleweed users in snapshot 20190505. The key packages that arrive so far this month are a newer Linux Kernel, a minor update for python-setuptools and the text editor GNU Nano fixed the spell checker from crashing.

The latest Tumbleweed snapshot, 20190507, which delivered nano 4.2, had a large update of changes for ghostscript 9.27; the versatile processor for PostScript data extensively cleaned up the Postscript name space and will now focus on the next releases to make SAFER the default mode of operation. The Optimized inner loop Runtime Compiler, orc 0.4.29, added decorator command line argument to add function decorators in header files. The latest python-setuptools 41.0.1 version fixed issues with the PEP 517, which specifies a standard API for systems which build Python packages. Text editor vim 8.1.1282 was also released in the snapshot. The snapshot is currently trending at a 95 rating, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Mozilla Firefox 66.0.4 fixed extension certificate chain in snapshot 20190506. There was an improvement to network status detection with Network Manager with the glib2 2.60.2 update. The asn1c-based parser was replaced by an openssl-based PKCS parser with the kmod 26 package. The openblas_pthreads 0.3.6 had some changes for POWER6, PowerPC 970 and ARMv7 and ARMv8. The 1.28 perl-YAML package offered a security fix and xfsprogs updated to the 5.0.0 version from 4.20.0. The snapshot is currently trending stable at a 92 rating on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

The snapshot that started out the month, snapshot 20190505, had a large amount of package updates. GNOME 3.32.1 was perhaps the most anticipated to arrive as the Taipei version offered various fixes to initial loading screens, updated the featured app ID,fixed Flatpak permissions to correctly show up for available apps and much more. The release introduced an experimental feature for Wayland desktop sessions that enables fractional scaling. Once enabled, desktops at certain resolutions can be scaled by non-integer values. The Advanced Trivial File Transfer Protocol (atftp) 0.7.2 version fixed a potential DoS bug introduced by a IPv6 patch. Compiler cache ccache 3.7.1 fixed a temporary file leak when the depend mode is enabled and the compiler produces standard error output; it also fixed crash when the debug mode is enabled and the output file is in a non-writable directory. Ceph added the lvmcache plugin and both the openSUSE Kubic and MicroOS installation images prevent MD/RAID auto-assembly if linuxrc says so. The  5.0.11 Linux Kernel added new USB Link Power Management (LPM) helpers. Other noteworthy packages updated in the snapshot were libsoup 2.66.1, libstorage-ng 4.1.119, webkit2gtk3 2.24.1 and yast2 4.2.1.  The snapshot is currently trending stable at a 96 rating on the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 Bali: Call for proposals is Open

May 1st, 2019 by

The openSUSE.Asia Committee call for proposals for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 is now open.

openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun.  Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

Following the Asia Summit in Taipei last year, the sixth openSUSE.Asia Summit year 2019 will be at Udayana University, Bali Indonesia on October 5th and 6th, 2019. The past Asia Summits have had participants from Indonesia, China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, India, Nepal, and etc.

Call for proposals

The speakers are eligible to receive sponsorship from openSUSE Travel Support Program (TSP). Even if you live away from Bali, please consider applying for the event.

Topics

openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will invite talks/workshop relevant to openSUSE and other topics like Cloud, Virtualization, Container, Container Orchestration, Linux desktop environments and applications since openSUSE is a collection of various FLOSS products. The examples of the topics (not limited to) are as the following:

  • openSUSE (including Leap, Tumbleweed, Open Build Services, OpenQA, YaST)
  • openSUSE Kubic, Cloud, Virtualization, Container, and Container Orchestration
  • Embedded and IoT
  • Linux kernel and file system
  • Security (Access/Integrity control, Cryptography, Vulnerability management)
  • Desktop environments and applications (e.g. GNOME, KDE, XFCE)
  • Office suite, graphic art, multimedia (e.g. LibreOffice, Calligra, GIMP, Inkscape)
  • Multilingualization support (e.g. input methods, translation)
  • Other software running on openSUSE

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Help promote openSUSE Leap 15.1!

April 30th, 2019 by

The release of openSUSE Leap 15.1 is about three weeks away. To help spread the word about the release, we have counters available at counter.opensuse.org and more artwork on https://github.com/openSUSE/artwork/. You can put these items on your social media or blog pages to make sure everybody knows that the Release is Coming!

For you blog and social media accounts

If you want to decorate your blog or website with a nice Leap 15.1 banner, grab one of these:

130×130
256×256
400×400
600×100

 

Release Counter

You can add the openSUSE 15.1 release counter to your website in various sizes by including the following html code in your blog:
<a href="http://en.opensuse.org/Portal:15.1"><img src="http://counter.opensuse.org/medium.png" border="0"/></a><br/>
“medium” is the size of the counter; it can also be “small” or “large” and we also have “wide” for a banner.

See the Countdown page on the openSUSE Wiki for more countdown information, code and tips!