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2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Vinzenz Vietzke

January 25th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 10 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Vinzenz Vietzke

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

My name is Vinzenz Vietzke, but sticking with the much shorter “vinz” or “vinzv” is what I prefer. I’m 34 years old, live in a small town in southern Germany.

Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv

Like most German Linux users around my age, I made my first steps with S.u.S.E. back in the late 1990s. Over the years, I moved across various distributions and contributed to quite a few of them in different ways. My day job is product management and marketing at Linux hardware vendor TUXEDO Computers.

Starting with just one laptop running openSUSE, we at TUXEDO now offer around 20 different models plus a wide range of desktop PCs with Leap 15 pre-installed. Customers also get free lifetime support for their preinstalled system. Therefore, of course, our free phone/email tech support team need to be trained for openSUSE as well.

For this whole project, I was, and still am, in charge as the tech and project lead to “bring” openSUSE onto TUXEDO’s computers. I got in touch with oS, worked out how and when we get everything done.

In addition to technical affairs, I’m the pushing person at TUXEDO Computers to make our company step up with supporting openSUSE. As a result, since October 2018, we are officially sponsoring the openSUSE project.

We offer any of our models as demo and workshop devices at no cost and take care for the logistics and event booth support. Furthermore we’re sponsoring oSC19 in Nuremberg with demo and install fest machines.

Of course, these things are mainly financial efforts and company internal projects. Yet, to get openSUSE a wider reception, there needs to be someone coordinating, pushing, and taking care. That’s why I call my contributions to openSUSE mostly “meta contributions”.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

Working together with both the Board and openSUSE devs during the last year really was a blast. There were huge efforts, ideas, and helping hands everywhere. And, as I’m no developer myself, serving at the Board would be a way to give something back.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Furthermore, I believe it’s important for the Community to have various candidates to pick from. And as I have the time I kinda feel obliged to at least offer my help.

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

From my perspective, the Board has two main roles: First and foremost, it is some kind of service provider. It serves the whole project as contact point for questions, projects coordination, and pointing in directions, etc.

This is crucial for the whole openSUSE Project and should never be changed, but merely extended if possible.

The second role might be named as “ideas sparking pot”. Most ideas coming from the Community are of a technical nature, which is entirely logical. Just, sometimes, there are things that the whole Project would benefit from, but no one sees them or has time to do so.

This is where the Board could jump in throwing sparks and giving input from someone being able to take a step back for viewing the bigger picture.

My role in this Board Team would both being approachable and helpful, for part one. But, also to give thoughts and ideas when needed, especially in the second part mentioned.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I’ve been into Linux and open source communities for about 10 years now. Though I’m not a long term Contributor for openSUSE, I know how “things work” in such a big, diverse project, and how to handle this stuff.

If you want to get someone with no “Geeko glasses” on you should vote for me. Not that being deeply inside openSUSE’s Community is a bad thing! But I can bring in new perspectives, most of them related to end-users, Windows-ditchers, and the curious, but not tech-savvy, people. I both understand developers and tech people on the one hand, as well as people who are buying Linux preinstalled hardware with little will to tinker around.

This way I act as some proxy between those worlds which in the end might be good for everyone involved.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I am a professionally trained pre-school teacher, which one might find useful for mailing list threads.

Contact information

Email: vinz AT vinzv.de
XMPP: vinz@vinzv.de
IRC: vinzv@freenode

Kubic is now a certified Kubernetes distribution

January 24th, 2019 by

Published by Richard Brown on Jan 22, 2019 on kubic.opensuse.org

Certified Kubernetes

The openSUSE Kubic team is proud to announce that as of yesterday, our Kubic distribution has become a Certified Kubernetes Distribution! Notably, it is the first open source Kubernetes distribution to be certified using the CRI-O container runtime!

What is Kubernetes Certification?

Container technologies in general, and Kubernetes in particular, are becoming increasingly common and widely adopted by enthusiasts, developers, and companies across the globe. A large ecosystem of software and solutions is evolving around these technologies. More and more developers are thinking “Cloud Native” and producing their software in containers first, often targeting Kubernetes as their intended platform for orchestrating those containers. And put bluntly, they want their software to work.

But Kubernetes isn’t like some other software with this sort of broad adoption. Even though it’s being used in scenarios large and small, from small developer labs to large production infrastructure systems, Kubernetes is still a fast-moving project, with new versions appearing very often and a support lifespan shorter than other similar projects. This presents real challenges for people who want to download, deploy and run Kubernetes clusters and know they can run the things they want on top of it.

When you consider the fast moving codebase and the diverse range of solutions providing or integrating with Kubernetes, that is a lot of moving parts provided by a lot of people. That can feel risky to some people, and lead to doubt that something built for Kubernetes today might not work tomorrow.

Thankfully, this a problem the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is tackling. The CNCF helps to build a community around open source container software, and established the Kubernetes Software Conformance Certification to further that goal. Certified Kubernetes solutions are validated by the CNCF. They check that versions, APIs, and such are all correct, present, and working as expected so users and developers can be assured their Kubernetes-based solutions will work with ease, now and into the future.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Sébastien Poher

January 24th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 11 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Sébastien Poher

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

My name is Sébastien Poher, aka sogal or sogal_geeko. I am 35 years old now and live in France, between Lyon and Grenoble, where I work.

I am a GNU/Linux system administrator, but this is a second professional life. Before that I got graduated in logistics and transport and I worked as logistician in the civilian world and, during several years, in the French army. Right after that, I wanted to do something different and went back to school for 2 years in order to study system and networking administration.

Sébastien Poher aka sogal

During the last 3 years, I worked for the IT service in an archaeological company where we have been using openSUSE for years on our workstations and some servers. I recently quit and join Probesys, a small cooperative company.

My first contributions were done amongst a Debian user community, called Debian-Facile (french for “Debian made easy”), as well as translator for FSF news and bulletin inside the April GNU-Trad team.

I start using openSUSE (Leap) in late 2016 after switching from Debian that I used for some times but felt it did not fit my needs anymore. I was looking for a more balance and adaptable operating system. This is when I really and definitely fell in love with openSUSE. I start contributing in early 2017, thanks to the OBS, by packaging small utility software and I now maintain a dozen of packages.

I am also involved in the French openSUSE community. I started to write articles about openSUSE in the Alionet (the name of a French openSUSE users association) forum, I translate project news and relay them in several social medias. In the “writing” part of my activities I have contributed to the French openSUSE wiki. Last year I got elected as Alionet’s president and I am happy with it, there is quite a lot of work to do but we are a small group of motivated people and things are moving fine.

In 2018, I also held openSUSE booths during 4 important FLOSS events and sometimes make openSUSE Project presentations. Such events are a good opportunity to meet old and new users, but also volunteers of other communities such as Debian, Fedora, Mageia, LibreOffice, April and to have some cross-community chats.

I am also an apprentice drums player, I love stoner rock and metal music, craft beer, strangely flavored teas, mountain walks and vegan food.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

To be honest, I had no plan of doing so in the first place. You may know that feeling “No… I can’t do it, I am not a highly skilled developer, just a small contributor, blablabla”. Then I saw the announcement, stating that there was not candidate yet. And I thought “What if there is really not candidates in the end? Will the project will suffer from it or no? As a project member, shouldn’t I try to help more?”.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi
2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

I do not have children, I have spare time, I like this project and think it is sane and fun. So why not keep on contributing in a different way? My inner self could not find any objection to it, so I applied!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

If I get elected, what I would like to work on first is a periodic, user-friendly, newspaper. Not on how openSUSE is done: We already benefit from high quality, very technical, news about the development of openSUSE, Tumbleweed and YaST. But I think there is a room for news that answer the question: “What could a user do with openSUSE in everyday life? And what benefit could openSUSE brings to users who consider switching from another operating system?”

As a Project, openSUSE is not only Leap and Tumbleweed, there are other sub-projects in it that deserve to be under the spotlight sometimes.

There are good examples out there that can be inspiring :

  • The Fedora Magazine
  • The monthly FSF Supporter (translated each month by volunteers)

I will also be happy to get in contact with local users groups and see how they can be involved in a process of translation and relay of this news. And, the other way round, I would like to have the project communicate more about what local communities are doing.

Beside that, I do not fool myself: being a Board Member does not only mean having great ideas and being the super-hero that makes them real. A considerable part of the job is about less fun, administrative tasks such as writing tons of e-mails, organizing meetings, writing minutes and so on. That is sometimes an ungrateful job, but it needs to be done so that each and everyone in the project can focus on its own tasks.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

Well, because my sincere interest in openSUSE and my ability to deal with issues in a peaceful but steady and persistent way make me a good candidate. Through the diversity of previous experiences I had in professional and associative life, I have learned how to deal successfully with this kind of tasks.

The openSUSE Project is wide and diversified and I believe the Board should represent this diversity.

My various contributions show that I can be a good bridge toward the non-technical users sphere and that I have a clear view of what could be done to increase the openSUSE popularity amongst them.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I was at the top of Mont Blanc at 8:00 AM on the 13th of August 2011 :) (and yes, I went there on foot).

Contact information

Email: sogal AT opensuse.org (to be preferred if you expect a quick answer)
on IRC under the nick ‘sogal’
Dispora : https://framasphere.org/people/d6a934c00f7b013456072a0000053625
Mastodon : https://fosstodon.org/@sogal
Twitter : https://twitter.com/sogal_geek

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch

January 23rd, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With less than two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Sarah Julia Kriesch

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

My name is Sarah Julia Kriesch. I am 31 years old and a work-experienced Student in Computer Science with a pre-education as a Computer Science Expert for System Integration. I had worked as a Linux System Administrator for an ISP and a Linux Systems Engineer at a Cloud Computing Provider for 4 years.

Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, incumbent

I am watching my studies as further education in Software Development, I have received the scholarship Aufstiegsstipendium to do that. Firstly, I worked as a Working Student for ownCloud besides my studies. Currently, I am a Student Research Assistant at my home university.

I learned using Linux at the beginning of my dual education in 2009. SLES 10 was my first Linux distribution. I wanted to know more. Therefore, I went to the oSC 11 as my first Linux conference. I met a fantastic openSUSE Community and learned more in 1 week than in 3 years in my education company. So I wanted to join. I was not allowed to contribute to openSUSE during my last year of education, because my education company did not want to see that.

They filtered Google after all contributions in forums and communities. That‘s the reason for my anonymous nickname AdaLovelace at openSUSE. I had to wait for joining openSUSE again until my first job in 2012 where I worked together with Contributors/ Members of Debian, FreeBSD and Fedora.

I started with German translations at openSUSE with half a year of work experience. Most of you know me from oSCs (since 2011). I was Member of the Video Team, the Registration Desk and contributed as a Speaker. Since 2013 I am wiki maintainer in the German/ English wiki and admin there. I report bugs if I find some and create feature requests.

Since 2014 I am an active Advocate in Germany. I give yearly presentations, organize booths and take part in different Open Source Events. I have switched to events in the UK during my Study Abroad Semester in the last year. In addition, I am the Global/ German Coordinator Localization and one Founder of the Heroes Team.

I contribute and support if I watch something needed. The open source education is such a case. So I founded the Working Group Open Source at the Nuremberg Institute of Technology because our lecturer for Linux Development has left our university a short time before my first day there. I am teaching foundations for open source development, Linux installations, shell programming and more together with my team and community volunteers.

Other universities have forked this concept for Computer Science with open source workshops. Additionally, we are bringing openSUSE forward at different faculties at our university. We are working on our IT project to migrate the Linux laboratory to openSUSE Leap with Kerberos this semester.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

I am staying behind the openSUSE Community and want to have happy Community Members. My role in the openSUSE Board has been to do right decisions and to resolve conflicts. I support if somebody needs that. I represent openSUSE and receive feedback from our users. I want to continue that all.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi
2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Two years are more quickly left than you can imagine and I am running for re-election for the openSUSE Board!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

I try to receive new Contributors to our community with education. Qualified new Contributors are required to receive promising future prospects for openSUSE. Additionally, I want to concentrate more on the well-being of the openSUSE Community. You don‘t receive new Contributors if you don‘t have the correct climate in the community. I want to build that on the introduction of the Board publicity by our elected Board Members in the last year.

That would improve the collaboration and respect within openSUSE. Another election pledge is the switch from DVDs to USB flash drives in the marketing material.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I am well connected inside and outside of openSUSE with a big open source network. I know most important people in the community and desire to create the best decisions for you with the view of a Computer Scientist with Sysadmin experience. I am desperate to become a long term openSUSE Contributor. So I don’t want to change the Community.

I have been an openSUSE Board Member in the last 2 years and you know me in this position. I am much obliged to be an elected Board Member for additional 2 years.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I am educated by communities and want to do so, too. I contribute to open source to improve the world.

Contact information

Email: sarah.kriesch AT opensuse.org
Blog: https://sarah-julia-kriesch.eu
facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sarahjulia.kriesch
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarah-julia-kriesch-16874b82
Connect: https://connect.opensuse.org//pg/profile/AdaLovelace
Github: https://github.com/skriesch





2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Dr. Axel Braun

January 22nd, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With less than two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Dr. Axel Braun

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

I’m an electrical engineer by education, and wrote my PhD about helical shieldings of medium-voltage XLPE cables. That was already in the pre-Google era as I’m 57 in between.

Currently I work as a business consultant for mostly large companies. Supply chain topics, introduction of ERP systems (I have a long SAP history) and program or project management. Most of these projects are international, with teams located across all timezones.

Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB

I started with S.u.S.E. in the late 90’s, as OS/2 was about to disappear, and there was no real other operating system alternative available (this is still true, but thats a different story). SuSE at that time had the nice boxes with tons of floppies and a printed manual. Great!

The advantage over other distros was, that is was easy to handle for an end-user (YaST….). Not every release change went smooth (not to forget, there were a couple of technical changes on the road) but for me it worked mostly.

My contribution to openSUSE nowadays is mostly the maintenance of various packages, as well as every now and then support on mailing lists – but mostly there are more skilled people than I am who are faster in answering.

My main focus is the packaging of GNU Health, which is a free (as in freedom) health and hospital information system. Setting-up an ERP System is not like installing a browser, and its the biggest challenge for most users.

The goal was to make installation easy to for non-technical users, and we have reached this so far! As Ludwig Nussel has given the encouragement, GNU Health is now shipped with the Leap Standard Distribution. Currently the new release is on the way to Factory, to have it shipped with Leap 15.1.

Some other packages are on my list: I have just packages OnionShare, to safely share files via a TOR Onion Service, converted the hylafax+ package from cron to systemd-timers, and started packaging the Orthanc Server (to display medical images in DICOM format) for openSUSE. For the plugins there will be some nodejs knowledge required….feel free to contact me if you want to help!

Any my life outside of tech and work? I have 2 kids of 20 and 25 which I only see randomly, but which leaves room for activities: Going sailing and surfing, ski and snowboard, running (only short distances, knee problems stopped me from running marathons), motorbiking (knee slider are not used anymore, did a restoration on a 1978 Yamaha DT 400 MX, a two-stroke Enduro) and an old cars that wants to be driven in the sunshine.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

First of all, I think openSUSE is the best distro on the market (my fully subjective view, of course). Second, I’m committed to the philosophy of free software, and free software is about collaboration.

The current board has done an incredibly good job, and I would like to help with continuing the work in order to support and grow the Community. I feel we all share the same target: To build the best Distro in the market, and still have a lot of fun with this!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

I will try to move openSUSE out of the server room and more on to the desktop of users. It is more than mature for every-day-usage.

Companies, especially those in the public sector, should be encouraged in the use of free software and open standards, to gain back digital sovereignty, save costs and increase security and privacy. Here we should enter discussions with officials. Ideally.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi
2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

I know it is difficult as this is not a topic to gain votes for officials. But I feel if we address this as a whole community, it has more impact than talking as individuals.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

Because it would be a mistake not to do it! LOL

Seriously, though, I have not only a technical, but as well a business view on certain topics, I feel this can add to the skillset of the board

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

Well, no scary hidden secrets that come to my mind.

But there are always incidents that are scary when they happen, but look funny afterwards. Traveling is always good for unexpected incidents: In 2001 I was visiting a customer production site 200km south of Warsaw in Poland.

Highways in Poland at that time were 2 lane roads, with horse and cart on the right lane, and pedestrians crossing. Every now and then the speed is reduced to 70. Of course I missed this, because I was on the phone and driving, and got stopped by the police.

I stepped out of the car and brought out my only two Polish words, Dzień dobry (Good day!)! The policemen started shouting at me in Polish, and after we clarified the language obstacles he made clear (in broken english) that I drove 97 instead of 70, and should follow to the police-car.

In the car they wanted a fine, which I was willing to pay, but I had no Zloty,
and only 10 or 20 Deutschmark in Cash. So they asked “What can we do?”

“Well,” I said, “can I pay with credit card?”

They looked at me like an alien, then at each other and discussed in Polish. No, that would not be possible. What can we do?

“Hm,” I said, “can we drive to an ATM (cash machine)?”. I felt like I was standing with one
leg in jail already.

Once again, they looked at me, then at each other and discussed in Polish. No, that would not be possible. What can we do?

I felt the second leg was moving into jail…so in honey words I prayed this really lovely country and the nice people, but if we have no way to pay the fine, I can only express my sincere apologies, and swear I will never drive too fast again.

They stared at me……handcuffs now?

After another internal discussion, and to my big surprise, they let me go, but I should make sure “they never catch me again”. For sure, I drove really slowly.

When I arrived at the plant, I told the story to the manager, and he laughed loud: “You stupid! ‘What can we do’ usually means they want slush money!”

That was a thing that was completely out of my mind

Contact information

Email: DocB AT opensuse.org
IRC: DocB on freenode
Twitter: @coogor





2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz

January 21st, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Christian Boltz

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

I’m Christian Boltz, 38 years old, and live in Insheim, Germany.

I have been using openSUSE for many years (it was still named “SuSE Linux” with lowercase “u” back when I began using it) and started annoying people in bugzilla, er, started betatesting in the 9.2 beta phase. Since then, I have reported more than 1300 bugs.

Christian Boltz aka cboltz, incumbent

Nowadays, OBS ruins my bugzilla statistics by introducing the option to send a SR. ;-)

One of my current activities in openSUSE is working in the Heroes team, where I started with moving and upgrading the wiki. I also help out on various *.opensuse.org servers since someone was evil enough to give me root permissions on lots of them ;-)

(Transparency note: I helped to setup the elections.opensuse.org server before last year’s elections – but will of course not touch it until the elections finish.)

My other openSUSE hobbies are AppArmor and PostfixAdmin, where I’m active in upstream development and as packager.

AppArmor also turned out to be a good opportunity for cross-distribution collaboration – with the funny side effect that I’m probably the only one who ever spoke at a DebConf wearing an openSUSE t-shirt.


Oh, and I have been a Member of the openSUSE Board for about two years. I would like to continue this “job”, and therefore I am running for re-election. My day job has nothing to do with computers. I produce something you can drink that is named after a software we ship in openSUSE.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

I enjoyed working on the Board and helping the Community whenever needed in the last two years, and I’m willing to continue this in the next two years. That doesn’t mean that I’ll stop doing that in case I don’t get re-elected, but being a Board member makes a few things easier.

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

I don’t have a plan for “doing a big change” – I’ll let promising that to our beloved (?) politicians and their election posters. Unlike politicians, my /dev/brain isn’t good at forgetting what I promised.

Instead, I follow the mailinglists etc. to learn about the issues and problems people hit, and unsurprisingly (you remember my bugzilla numbers?) sometimes I also run into problems myself – both technical and non-technical.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi
2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

If there’s something that needs improvement and looks doable, then I try to get that improvement done in the way that looks most promising. For technical problems, that can mean to encourage people to report bugs, talk to the responsible people, or to simply do a submit request if the problem is easily fixable and the bugzilla paperwork would take more time than actually doing it.

If the problem is “political”, then the obvious way is doing it via the Board, but that doesn’t stop me from using “less official” ways if they look easier and/or more promising.

Push for Solutions

For example, I annoyed various SUSE people about the non-public SLE bugs since years – long before I was a Board member. It took a very long time, but now we at least have bugshare. I know it is only a far from perfect workaround, but it’s still better than nothing. If a chance comes up to make more SLE bugs public, I’ll be annoying enough to get it done.

But: SLE bugs often involve customer data, so I won’t and can’t promise this.

Luckily most problems don’t take that long. I’m really a fan of fixing issues quickly instead of letting people suffer from them for a long time. Especially small things should (and can!) be solved quickly.

In the places I’m involved (including, but not only the Board), people know me for reminding them of pending issues. Maybe they sometimes hate me for doing that, but I can live with that if it means to get something fixed faster.

OTOH, I always try to be balanced and listen to both sides, which is useful when helping to resolve a conflict (which luckily isn’t needed too often thanks to our great community) and in many other cases.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I’ll be lazy here, and hope that what I wrote above already answered this. As I already wrote two years ago: I tend to kick people to ensure they work faster and fix things. This is your chance to kick me!

Oh, and if there’s only one bottle of openSUSE beer left, I’m the best person to have in the queue between you and the barkeeper because I don’t drink beer (not even openSUSE beer).

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

If you hoped that I’ll disclose what my day job is, I have to disappoint you. The hint in the biography should be enough to find out yourself. Instead, I’ll tell you about a trick I sometimes use, even if that comes with the risk of “burning” that trick:

I sometimes ask so-called “silly questions”. That can happen if I really have no idea what’s going on, but more often than not, it’s a way of telling someone “I know that this is wrong/broken” in a less offending way.

Contact information

IRC: cboltz on freenode and oftc

Mail: cboltz AT opensuse.org or opensuse AT cboltz.de

Blog: https://blog.cboltz.de

You can also find me on several mailinglists, and of course I still scare people in bugzilla. I‘m also a regular visitor and speaker at the openSUSE Conference, and visit other conferences as time permits. For example, you can meet me at FOSDEM in about two weeks.


Tumbleweed Starts Year with New Plasma, Applications, VIM, curl

January 18th, 2019 by

This new year has brought several updated packages to users of openSUSE’s rolling release Tumbleweed.

Three snapshots have been released in 2019 so far and among the packages updated in the snapshots are KDE’s Plasma, VIM, RE2, QEMU and curl.

The 20190112 snapshot brought a little more than a handful of packages. The new upstream Long-Term-Support version of nodejs10 10.15.0 addressed some timing vulnerabilities, updated a dependency with an upgrade to OpenSSL 1.1.0j and the versional also has a 40-seconds timeout that is now applied to servers receiving HTTP headers. The changelog listed several fixes for the highly configurable text editor with vim 8.1.0687, which should now be able to be built with Ruby 2.6.0 that was released at the end of December. Google’s re2 20190101 offered some performance tweaks and bug fixes. The fast real-time compression algorithm of zstd 1.3.8 has better decompression speed on large files. There was a change in the yast2-firewall package, which arrived in the the 20190110 snapshot, that allows new ‘forward_ports’, ‘rich_rules’ and ‘source_ports’ elements in zone entries with yast2-schema 4.1.0.

KDE’s Plasma 5.14.5 arrived in snapshot 20190110; the update fixed the max cache limit for Plasma addons and there were updates for Breeze GTK, Discover, KWin, Plasma Workspace, Powerdevil and more. The Intel tool that provides powersaving modes in userspace, kernel and hardware, powertop 2.10, enabled support for Intel GLK, which was formerly known as Gemini Lake, and support for Intel CNL-U/Y. The geolocations services package geoclue2 2.5.2 had a change that allow multiple clients on the same D-Bus connection and adds an application programming interface (API) for it, which was mainly done for the Flatpak location portal. The IRC client irssi 1.1.2 had multiple fixes and synced a new script. GNOME’s jhbuild 3.28.0 enabled a build of libosinfo tests. Translations were update for Czech with libstorage-ng 4.1.75 through Weblate and several YaST packages were updated, including yast2 4.1.48 and yast2-multipath 4.1.1, which had a fix for the use of a random file name.

The first snapshot of the year was extremely huge. Snapshot 20190108 updated more than a hundred packages. KDE’s Application 18.12.0 were updated and it brought more than 140 bugs fixes for applications like Kontact Suite, Cantor, Dolphin, Gwenview, KmPlot, Okular, Spectacle, Umbrello and more. The update of curl 7.63.0 had a fix for IPv6 numeral address parser along with several other fixes and a support session resume with TLS 1.3 protocol via OpenSSL. Apparmor 2.13.2 fixed a syntax error in rc.apparmor.functions, which could cause policy load failures. The Linux Kernel 4.19.12 was in the first snapshot of the year and should move closer to the latest stable version in the coming weeks. Various fixes and compatibility tweaks were made with the update of libreoffice 6.1.4.2, which removed some patches. The compression format package brotli 1.0.7 now has faster decoding on ARM. The newest version of claws-mail 3.17.3, added support for TLS Server Name Indication (SNI), which enables the sending of a hostname, if available, to the server so that it can select the appropriate certificate for a domain; this is useful for servers that host multiple domains on the same IP address. Other noteworthy updates were  Python-setuptools 40.6.3, qemu 3.1.0 and squid 4.5.

All snapshots have either logged or are treading as moderately stable with a rating of 83 or above, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. There are more than 300 packages in staging that will likely be released in several snapshots over the coming weeks.

And the Race is On! 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections Enter Campaign Phase

January 15th, 2019 by

Nominations and applications for Candidates came to a close Sunday, January 13, 2019, and the Campaign Phase of the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections kicked in Monday, January 14, with a seventh impressive Candidate, Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha entering the race for the three vacant Board Seats.

Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha

Marina is a very active Italian openSUSE Advocate, involved in the Project since 2009, deeply involved in LibreOffice.  She relocated to Munich last June, where she is working for CIB mainly on its LibreOffice team as Senior Migrations & Deployments Engineer.  You may read more about Marina on her Wiki User page.

Marina joins an already impressive line-up of Quality Candidates who announced they were stepping up during the past week, adding to what will be very tough decisions for the Voters in the upcoming Elections.  Official openSUSE Members in Good Standing are qualified to vote in the Elections, and they will have to make difficult choices for who should take the three open Board Seats, choosing between Marina, incumbent Christian Boltz aka cboltz, Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB, incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, Sébastien Poher aka sogal, Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv, and Nathan Wolf aka futureboy and CubicleNate on IRC.

Sarah and Sébastien’s run for the Board was announced in last Wednesday’s openSUSE News, while the Candidacies of Christian, Dr. Braun, Vinzenz, and  Nathan were announced in the next day’s news article.

Drive Still Underway for New openSUSE Members

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members, and it is especially important for the Elections process.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Applications for openSUSE Membership are accepted and processed on an ongoing basis, but a Membership Drive has been declared by the Elections Officials in an effort to get as many qualified Project Contributors to take part in the voting process, which is scheduled to begin February 4, 2019, and run for 12 days with ballots closing February 15.

Contributors Should Get Involved

All openSUSE Contributors and Members are requested to actively urge other Contributors who are not Members to get their Membership and get out and vote.  All Members who have been approved by the Membership Committee before the start of balloting February 4 will be eligible to vote in this election.

You can apply for openSUSE Membership by following the instructions here.

Six Impressive Candidates Step Up for the 2018-2019 Board Elections

January 10th, 2019 by

Vinzenz Vietzke

The Elections Committee, Edwin Zakaria, Ish Sookun, and Gerry Makaro, are pleased to announce today, Thursday, January 10, 2019, that six very impressive Candidates have decided to step up and run for Membership on the openSUSE Board in the 2018-2019 Board Elections.  With four days left for Candidates to apply, it is possible that more quality Candidates might throw their hats into the ring to make this a very exciting race.

Christian Boltz, incumbent

Applications for Candidacy are open until Sunday, January 13.  If you are contemplating entering what is shaping up to be one of the best election campaigns yet, please hurry and apply by sending an application to the Project Mailing List and to the Elections Officials following the instructions on the official Elections page.

Four More Candidates Enter Elections Race

Incumbent Christian Boltz aka cboltz, an openSUSE Hero with a strong and active presence in the Community, is running for re-election in a bid for a second term serving on the Board.  Most voters will already know him well, but more information can be found in his platform at this page.

Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv is stepping up for the first time and brings some impressive credentials to the table.  Among other things, Vinz has been instrumental in getting openSUSE Leap 15.0 offered pre-installed on Linux Hardware Vendor TUXEDO Computers and in getting TUXEDO as an Official Sponsor of openSUSE as of October, 2018.  You may read more about him and his platform on the Wiki pages.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Longtime openSUSE Member, active Package Maintainer, and strong openSUSE promoter, Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB — who has also been known to give standup lectures related to Linux and openSUSE — is entering the race for a seat on the Board.  A Member since 2010, Dr. Braun actively maintains GNU Health, Tryton ERP Framework and various other packages.  You can find more information at his Membership Profile.

A prolific Wiki Contributor and openSUSE Enthusiast, Nathan Wolf aka futureboy, also as CubicleNate on IRC, fills out the roster of six Candidates, making this an exciting Elections Race.  You can read a bit about his Contributions on this Wiki page.

The other two Candidates, announced in yesterday’s openSUSE News, are Sébastien Poher aka sogal and incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch, aka AdaLovelace.

Membership Drive Still Underway

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members, and it is especially important for the Elections process.  Applications for openSUSE Membership are accepted and processed on an ongoing basis, but a Membership Drive has been declared by the Elections Officials in an effort to get as many qualified Project Contributors to take part in the voting process, which is scheduled to begin February 4, 2019, and run for 12 days with ballots closing February 15.

All openSUSE Contributors and Members are requested to actively urge other Contributors who are not Members to get their Membership and get out and vote.  All Members who have been approved by the Membership Committee before the start of balloting February 4 will be eligible to vote in this election.

You can apply for openSUSE Membership by following the instructions here.

First Two Candidates for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections Announced

January 9th, 2019 by

The Elections Committee announced today, Tuesday, January 8, 2019, the first two Candidates who have passed the application and eligibility process and are declared as officially running for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections as the January 13 deadline for Candidate Applications is swiftly approaching.

Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, incumbent

Outgoing Board Member Sarah Julia Kriesch, aka AdaLovelace, is seeking her second term on the Board as an encumbent.  Sarah, from Nuremberg, Germany, is a work-experienced student in Computer Science at the Nuremberg Institute of Technology and has been working as a Student Research Assistant.

A very active openSUSE Contributor, Sébastien Poher, has also thrown his hat into the ring for the first time and is bringing energy and an impressive list of openSUSE activity to the elections race.

Three openSUSE Board Seats Vacant

Three Board Seats are vacant in this election with the January 13 deadline to apply as a Candidate looming.  Eligibility to run for the Board positions is based on having an openSUSE Membership in Good Standing, so anyone who qualifies still has a few days left to join the Elections process and give the Members a good variety of choices for these important positions.

More Candidates are Required

The Project is best served if it has a good variety of openSUSE Enthusiasts to choose from during the Elections.

Members who are willing to step up and pay things forward by serving on the openSUSE Board are urged to apply by sending an application to the Project Mailing List and to the Elections Officials following the instructions on the official Elections page.

openSUSE Membership Drive Still Underway

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members, and it is especially important for the Elections process.  Applications for openSUSE Membership are accepted and processed on an ongoing basis, but a Membership Drive has been declared by the Elections Officials in an effort to get as many qualified Project Contributors to take part in the voting process, which is scheduled to begin February 4, 2019, and run for 12 days with ballots closing February 15.

All openSUSE Contributors and Members are requested to actively urge other Contributors who are not Members to get their Membership and get out and vote.  All Members who have been approved by the Membership Committee before the start of balloting February 4 will be eligible to vote in this election.

You can apply for openSUSE Membership by following the instructions here.