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Posts Tagged ‘btrfs’

Mesa, Kernel, Wireshark update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

January 11th, 2017 by

There were plenty of Tumbleweed snapshots leading up to the holiday season and openSUSE’s rolling release is gliding into 2017 with several new packages on the horizon.

The last snapshot of 2016, 20161226, updated the Linux Kernel to 4.9, which was a good way to end the year. Several packages were updated in the snapshot including Python3-setuptools to version 31.0.0, gnome-online-accounts 3.22.3, NetworkManager 1.4.4 and yast2-network 3.2.17.

NetworkManager changed the order in which IP addresses are configured is now preserved so that primary address is selected correctly.  Yast2-network enabled DHCP_HOSTNAME listbox only when wicked service is used.

The biggest update in the first 2017 snapshot, 20170104, was the several KDE Plasma 5.8.5 packages that were updated. Samba updated to version 4.5.3 and fixed CVE-2016-2123.

Mozilla Thunderbird’s update to version 45.6 fixed a couple security and memory bugs.

The library offering an Application Programming Interface to access secure communication protocols called GnuTLS updated to version 3.5.7, fixed several bugs and set limits on the maximum number of alerts handled.

Also in the snapshot, Wireshark fixed User Interface bugs with an update to version 2.2.3, newbie-friendly text-editor nano updated to 2.7.3 and libvirt-python added new APIs and constants with the update to 2.5.0.

The 20170109 snapshot provided a cleaned up configuration settings for Mesa, so it can be uniform across all architectures except for list of Direct Rendering Infrastructure and Gallium drivers. Btrfsprogs 4.9 clean up was well and offers better handling of file system snapshots. Python3-setuptools updated to 32.3.1, which is fixed regressions and compatibility  issues from previous versions.

Optimal Release for Linux Professionals Arrives with openSUSE Leap 42.2

November 16th, 2016 by

A Professional Distribution for Developers, System Administrators and Users

(Languages: CZ, DE, EN, ES, FR, IT, JA, LT, TW)

Members of the openSUSE Project are pleased to announce the release of the next minor version of Leap; openSUSE Leap 42.2! Leap is made to give stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters peace of mind. openSUSE Leap 42.2 is powered by the Linux 4.4 Long-Term-Support (LTS) kernel and is a secure, stable and reliable server operating system for deploying IT services in physical, virtual or cloud environments.

A selective process of including well-established packages in openSUSE Leap 42.2 gives new meaning to the term Linux Optimization; openSUSE Leap is simply the safe choice that offers Linux professionals a user-friendly desktop and a feature-rich server environment.

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Continuing the tradition of using source code from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE), openSUSE Leap 42.2 provides a level of stability unmatched by other Linux distributions. With community-built packages on top of Leap’s enterprise reliability, openSUSE Leap users benefit both from community and enterprise maintenance efforts.

Contributions to openSUSE Leap from SUSE include several new features like Network Functions Virtualization capabilities that combines Open vSwitch with the Data Plane Development Kit to process packets faster. YaST also has a significant amount of improvements and new features.

Community contributions were equally enormous as more than 1,400 new packages made it into this newest Leap version, with 42.2 providing 17% more packages than 42.1.

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What to expect from Btrfs on openSUSE 13.2?

November 12th, 2014 by

As the first major Linux distribution to have Btrfs as the default file system, what can users and developers expect from openSUSE 13.2?

How is the systems capabilities enhanced?

Btrfs has different performance characteristics; it’s a logging-style file system that provides fault tolerance, repair, and easy management features.

The most well known advantage of Btrfs is the rollback capability with the open-source tool Snapper.

“Btrfs is mature,” said George Shi, who helped rollbacks become a reality for openSUSE users. “It works with Snapper to implement snapshot and rollback, the killer function of Btrfs. You can pick any date you saved to rollback your full system.”

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Using BTRFS on openSUSE 12.1

January 23rd, 2012 by

This article is contributed by Kamila Součkova

Introduction

As the btrfs wiki says: “Btrfs is a new copy on write filesystem for Linux aimed at implementing advanced features while focusing on fault tolerance, repair and easy administration.” Although under heavy development, it has become stable enough for personal use, and there are plenty of reasons to try it. What distinguishes it from earlier filesystems is that it has been designed with scalability and robustness in mind: it can handle huge files (up to 16EiB — a lot!), it can pack lots of files and directories efficiently, has built-in error detection methods (checksums of data and metadata), support for transparent compression, integrated multiple devices support (RAID-0, RAID-1 and RAID-10 so far) and more — see here for a more complete list.

In this how-to I will focus on one particularly neat feature: snapshots. Btrfs allows you to make read-only or writable snapshots of the state of your filesystem without wasting space with redundant data. Together with YaST’s Snapper module, this makes tracking FS changes and undoing undesired modifications a breeze.

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