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Samba, Ceph, LightDM Update in Tumbleweed Snapshots

April 20th, 2017 by

Snapshots released the past two weeks of openSUSE Tumbleweed have slowed down a bit, but new software continues to be updated in the five snapshots that have been release since April 6.

The most recent snapshot, 20170417, brought Samba 4.6.2, which had an enormous amount of bug fixes and addressed regression issues introduced by the security fixes for CVE-2017-2619. gPhoto had lots of improvements thanks to the update to libgphoto2 2.5.13. The snapshot also updated ethtool to version 4.10, which synchronized the utility used for displaying and modifying some parameters of network interface controllers with the upstream release, and yast2-fonts’ 3.2.0 version fixed regression introduced in version 3.1.17 and added UTF-8 encoding to Ruby strings.

Snapshot 20170414  provided the 3.5.25 version of squid in the repositories, which fixed aspects involved with data connections and FTP traffic intercepts, and yast2-dhcp-server’s 3.2.2 version fixed a crash happens with the latest yast2-core and yast2-ruby-bindings packages. The premier library for Internationalization Components for Unicode (ICU), which provides globalized support for software applications, was updated to version  58.2 and fixed some issues for Cantonese, Greek and Arabic users as well as updated Emoji characters and 19 new symbols for the new 4K TV standard.

Mozilla Firefox fixed a startup crash on Linux with it’s 52.0.2 release in Tumbleweed’s 20170413 snapshot and the Linux Kernel was updated to version 4.10.9. Linux Kernel initiator open-iscsi had a large amount of patch removals and additions. The btrfs file system matured even more with the release of version 4.10.2. The suite and art application Calligra received a fix for crash when using arrow keys in version 3.0.1 and it’s Flow chart added undo commands. The snapshot also merged upstream Ceph fixes for the codestream. WindowMaker 0.95.8 added some patches and new features for veteran users. (more…)

New systemd, Plasma 5.9 Arrive in Tumbleweed

February 2nd, 2017 by


Another busy week for openSUSE Tumbleweed brought several new packages in the rolling release along with Plasma 5.9 and systemd 232.

The most recent snapshot, 20170131, added several new features with KDE’s Plasma 5.9.

“In our ongoing effort to make you more productive with Plasma, we added interactive previews to our notifications,” according to the release announcement on Plasma 5.9.

Additional features like icon widgets being created for applications and document when dragged to the desktop and several other new features like streamlined visuals, global menus and a new network configuration module can be found in the newest Plasma 5.9 version.

The  20170131 snapshot also update KDE Frameworks 5.30.0, AppStream 0.10.5, libvirt 3.0.0 and libzypp 16.4.0.

Another big update in Tumbleweed this past week was the arrival of systemd 232 in the 20170128 snapshot. The new systemd version in Tumbleweed includes new options for RemoveIPC, ProtectKernelModules and more.

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Roundup of recent Tumbleweed highlights

December 15th, 2014 by

Here are some highlights from the most recent Tumbleweed snapshot.

Mozilla Firefox updated to 34.0.5 from 33.1. The default search engine changed to Yahoo for North America and Yandex for Belarusian, Kazakh, and Russian locations. The update improved the search bar for English only in the U.S. and improved the Firefox Hello real-time communication client.

Mozilla Thunderbird also updataed to 31.3.0 from 31.2.0. It now requests crashes with some input streams and fixed memory safety problems and crashes.

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openSUSE 11.2 Released!

November 12th, 2009 by

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the release of openSUSE 11.2.  openSUSE 11.2 includes new versions of GNOME, KDE, OpenOffice.org, Firefox, the Linux kernel, and many, many more updates and improvements. In 11.2 you’ll find more than 1,000 open source desktop applications. openSUSE also includes a full suite of server software and a rich selection of open source development tools.

You can find a bevy of screenshots and more on the openSUSE wiki, and a lengthy list of packages and version numbers on DistroWatch.

Let’s take a look at some of the more interesting features of openSUSE 11.2!

openSUSE Desktop

As always, openSUSE provides everything you need to get started with Linux on the desktop.

openSUSE 11.2 includes KDE 4.3 as the “default” desktop. If you install from DVD without changing anything, you’ll have the KDE desktop by default. However, we still provide GNOME as an equal choice, and Xfce and other window managers as alternative desktops too!

KDE 4.3 is a major update to the KDE platform. It includes improved networking support, and work to make Firefox and OpenOffice.org better integrated with the KDE enviroment. The openSUSE Project also worked closely with the KDE Project on theming and branding to provide a look and feel that meshes both projects nicely.

You’ll also find plenty of GNOME greatness in openSUSE 11.2 as well. GNOME 2.28, the latest release of the popular GNOME desktop, is included with 11.2. This release includes a brand new theme, improved software update application, improvements in GNOME’s Webcam and video application, and many other enhancements and improvements to prepare the GNOME platform for GNOME 3.0 in 2010.

OpenOffice.org 3.1 is a complete office productivity suite compatible with Microsoft Office. This release includes improvements in change tracking and collaboration in Writer, and major improvements to the drawing application.

Social networking gets a boost in 11.2 with the addition of GNOME and KDE microblogging clients that handle multiple social network sites, Gwibber, and Choqok.

With openSUSE 11.2, you have the ability to install GNOME or KDE live media from USB, and numerous improvements to make openSUSE 11.2 much better on netbooks.

Under the Hood

The desktop improvements are the most noticeable, but there’s plenty going on under the hood as well in openSUSE 11.2.

Storage improvements include the ability to encrypt the entire hard disk, for users concerned about data security. Users can also take advantage of the next generation of filesystems for Linux with Ext4 or btrfs. In case you’d like to learn more about the new kernel features you can go at KernelNewbies.org and have a look at the “cool stuff” part.

Want to manage remote openSUSE servers with a Web interface? That day is coming soon! openSUSE 11.2 users can install the first technology preview of WebYaST: a Web-based remote administration tool for openSUSE systems.

Finally, you can upgrade in-place using Zypper! Though it’s been possible to do an upgrade in place for some time, with caution, it’s finally a “recommended” method of upgrade with openSUSE 11.2. For users who want to move from 11.1 to 11.2 using “zypper dup,” see Andreas Jaeger’s post on Lizards about the process. It’s quick, it’s easy, and almost competely painless.

Linux for Education

The openSUSE Build Service provides thousands of applications as 1-click packages to enhance your experience on openSUSE 11.2. The openSUSE Education Community provides hundreds of Educational applications suitable for students of all ages, parents, teachers and IT administrators of educational institutions via the Build Service.

The 11.2 release will be followed closely by a very special spin, Li-f-e: Linux for Education. Li-f-e contains GNOME, KDE as well the the award-winning Sugar learning environment for children. With packages from the Packman repository, Li-f-e provides everything required to get rich multimedia experience too.

Media and Download

openSUSE is now available for immediate download! You have several choices of installation media and live CDs (which are also installable).

  • openSUSE 11.2 Installable DVD 32-bit
  • openSUSE 11.2 Installable DVD 64-bit
  • openSUSE 11.2 GNOME 32-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 GNOME 64-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 KDE 32-bit Live CD
  • openSUSE 11.2 KDE 64-bit Live CD

Booting openSUSE 11.2 from a USB key: get one of the Live CDs available above, and can copy it to a USB key with the following command:

dd if=image.iso of=/dev/sdX bs=4M

Replace “image.iso” with the name of the ISO image that you have downloaded, and replace “sdX” with the actual device name of your USB drive. Be careful! This will erase the target device, so make sure you have the correct device name and have any vital data backed up!

We want to hear from you!

The openSUSE Project has many channels of communication! Whether you prefer forums, email, or IRC, there are plenty of ways to communicate about openSUSE.

To keep up to date with openSUSE, be sure to keep an eye on openSUSE News and watch Planet SUSE for blog posts from the openSUSE community. We also update the @opensuse account on Twitter and Identi.ca regularly with news about the project.

Want to help the openSUSE Project? To get involved with openSUSE see the How to Participate page on the openSUSE wiki. We can use lots of different skills to help the project, so feel free to jump in!

Thanks!

openSUSE 11.2 represents the combined effort of hundreds of developers who participate in openSUSE, and thousands of developers in upstream projects that are shipped in openSUSE. The contributors, inside and outside the openSUSE Project, should be proud of this release, and they deserve a major “thank you” for all of the hard work and care that have gone into 11.2.

When we say “contributor,” we don’t mean only developers and packagers. This includes translators, openSUSE Ambassadors, the openSUSE Board, and the users who help power our forums and support users who are taking their first steps into Linux.

We are confident that openSUSE 11.2 is the best openSUSE release yet, and that it will help to encourage the use of Linux everywhere! We hope that you have a lot of fun while you use openSUSE 11.2!