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New 4.0.2 Version of Uyuni is Released

August 2nd, 2019 by

Contributors of Uyuni Project have released a new version of Uyuni 4.0.2, which is an open-source infrastructure management solution tailored for software-defined infrastructure.

Uyuni, a fork of the Spacewalk project, modernizing Spacewalk with SaltStack, provides more operating systems support and better scalability capabilities. Uyuni is now the upstream for SUSE Manager.

With this release, Uyuni provides powerful new features such as monitoring, content lifecycle management and virtual machine management.

Both the Uyuni Server node and the optional proxy nodes work on top of openSUSE Leap 15.1 and support Leap 15.1, CentOS, Ubuntu and others as clients. Debian support is experimental. The new version of Uyuni uses Salt 2019.2, Grafana 6.2.5, Cobbler 3.0 and Python 3.6 in the backend.

“The upgrade involves the complete replacement of the underlying operating system,” according to a post on July 9 by Hubert Mantel on Github. “This is a very critical operation and it is impossible to handle any potential failure in a graceful way. For example, an error during upgrade of the base OS might lead to a completely broken system which cannot be recovered.

Given that the upgrade of Uyuni also involves upgrading the base operating system from Leap 42.3 to Leap 15.1, it is highly advisable to create a backup of the server before running the migration. If the Uyuni server is running in a virtual machine, it is recommended to take a snapshot of the machine before running the migration.

Migration is performed by first updating the susemanager package:

zypper ref && zypper in susemanager

Then run the migration script:

/usr/lib/susemanager/bin/server-migrator.sh

“This script will stop the services, subscribe the new software repositories and finally perform the actual update to the new version,” Mantel wrote on Github. “After successful migration, services will not be started automatically. The system needs to be rebooted and this will also re-start all the services. There is nothing additional the admin needs to do.”

The intention of the fork was to provide new inspiration to a Spacewalk, which had been perceived as idling in recent years. Uyuni is using Salt for configuration management, thereby inheriting its name: Uyuni refers to the world’s largest Salt flat, Salar de Uyuni in Southwest Bolivia.

Interested members can follow the project on https://github.com/uyuni-project, www.uyuni-project.org, via Twitter at @UyuniProject, or join #uyuni at irc.freenode.org.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 End of Life is Extended

August 8th, 2018 by

The usual lifetime of openSUSE Leap minor versions have traditionally received updates for about 18 months, but the minor version of Leap 42.3 is being extended.

The last minor version of the Leap 42 series was scheduled to be maintained until January 2019, but that has changed thanks to SUSE committing to additional months of maintenance and security updates. Leap 42.3 is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack (SP) 3  and SUSE has agreed to keep publishing updates for Leap 42.3 until June 2019.

This means the extended End of Life for Leap 42.3 will increase the total lifetime of the Leap 42 series to 44 months.

Users of the openSUSE Leap 42 series are encouraged to use the additional months to prepare the upgrade to Leap 15, which was released in May.

Those who can’t migrate production servers to the new major version in time may want to take a (commercial) SLE subscription into consideration, which provides even a longer lifecycle. The proximity of Leap 42’s base system to SLE 12 keeps the technical effort to migrate workflows from Leap to SLE low.

 

Heroes preparing to make the leap

July 14th, 2017 by

openSUSE-Heroes LogoYou might have noticed some normally unwanted activity over the last weeks affecting the openSUSE infrastructure – resulting in reduced availability or downtime of the provided services.

Today we are happy to announce that most of the infrastructure work is done and the openSUSE Heroes together with the SUSE-IT team achieved a lot – ready to welcome openSUSE Leap 42.3 in time!

There might be still the one or the other small issue – but we expect that the majority of services will be stable for now (until we prove something different ;-)

The very good news: while Leap 42.3 is approaching, a couple of machines hosting openSUSE services are already using the latest 42.3 release in production!

That is what we call testing!

So while the Heroes lean back now and let the dust settle for a moment, we are really looking forward to the next steps that are on our TODO  list.

What was done in detail?

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Next Leap 42.3 Snapshot Equates to Release Candidate

June 6th, 2017 by

Rolling Development Still needs Testing, Promoters

Since changing to a rolling development version model for the eventual release of openSUSE Leap 42.3, challenges have arisen to get more people testing it.

There is no milestone releases (Alpha or Beta) for openSUSE Leap 42.3, but snapshots of the development version are constantly being released.

“So far I have not seen too many 42.3 bugs,” said Leap Release Manager Luwdig Nussel in his talk at the openSUSE Conference. “I don’t think we are bug free, so I think it just is not tested enough.”

Some Linux users might find a rolling development process for a Linux release to be less appealing for testing, but testing is certainly necessary before the actual release Leap 42.3 at the end of July.

The next minor version of Leap 42.3 is mostly a refresh and hardware enablement release that will have more than 10,000 packages. While the development version of Leap 42.3 it is still considerably stable because it is extremely hardened and shares sources from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12, the release could still use more testing and people willing to promote openSUSE’s next minor 42 series version.

Nussel said SLE 12 Service Pack 3 (SP3) and Leap 42.3 are developed in parallel to one another and both benefit from mutual bug reports.

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