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Tumbleweed Gets Kernel 4.10.1, Mesa 17, Python 3.6

March 2nd, 2017 by

The joy and experimentation of Hack Week didn’t keep openSUSE Tumbleweed from continuing to roll.

Since the last news article on Tumbleweed two weeks ago, there have been eight snapshots featuring new software packages.

The most recent snapshot to land in the repositories was snapshot 20170228, which provided less than a handful of packages.

Snapshots 20170227 delivered the latest stable Linux Kernel 4.10.1. GStreamer 1.10.4 provided various fixes for crashes, assertions, deadlocks and memory leaks in the snapshot, and python-setuptools 34.2.0 had a lengthy list of changes, which also dropped support for python 2.6 and 3.2.

In snapshots 20170226,  Speex, a patent-free audio compression format that aims to lower the barrier of entry for voice applications by providing a free alternative to expensive proprietary speech codecs, officially released its 1.2 version in Tumbleweed. Flatpak 0.8.3 version included backports of the updated OpenGL support from master and in combination with the work in the runtime allows Flatpak to work out of the box with out-of-tree OpenGL drivers, including the nvidia driver. (more…)

Last Release Candidate for openSUSE Leap 42.2 Released

November 2nd, 2016 by

The development cycle for openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidates (RC) is coming to an end.

RC2, which will be followed by the stable release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 on Nov. 16, is now available for testers after its release today.

“A big change is that the Mesa Nouveau 3D driver was split out to a
separate package as KDE crashes with it on some newer NVidia cards,” wrote release manager Ludwig Nussel to the openSUSE Factory Mailing List.

Users of Leap’s newest version will notice improved capabilities with snapper snapshots based on the btrfs file system, which is the default file system selection. A new btrfs quota concept makes snapper much less disk-hungry and can be manually setup. Snapper is a poka yoke and can give system administrators confident about updating new packages and rolling back the system if an error is made. There is a selection of other file systems for Leap, but benefits of snapper are not available with the other file systems.

Leap is a community-enterprise distribution that appeals to stability-minded users and conservative technology adopters. Leap has a shared core with SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) and hundreds of SLE 12 Service Pack (SP) 2 packages. There are also thousands of community-built packages in Leap. The distribution gives developers and organizations an ability to bridge to the faster release cycles of openSUSE Tumbleweed or to a more Long Term Support enterprise solution with SLE.

Media who are interested in more information should contact Douglas DeMaio at ddemaio@suse.de.