Home Home > 2014 > 10 > 16 > openSUSE 13.2: time to get your hands dirty
Sign up | Login

openSUSE 13.2: time to get your hands dirty

October 16th, 2014 by

I want YOU!With less than three weeks from the release of our beloved green distro and the first release candidate already rocking, we can feel like we are almost there. This is exactly the right time to remember that there is still a lot of work to do and fun to have. Open source is awesome, but only as awesome as the people working on it. Nothing will happen unless YOU make it happen, so it’s time to get your hands dirty!

Testing

Every openSUSE release is tested using openQA, which saves developers from trivial and repetitive work. But in order to reach the quality level we all love from openSUSE stable releases much more testing is needed. We would like to test every single combination of hardware -from netbooks to supercomputers- and options -from default values to the most geeky weird configurations-. So please take a look to the online spreadsheet that has been created to organize the manual testing, read the instructions about coordinating the effort and hunt all those nasty bugs!

Celebrating awesomeness

We want to let the world know how awesome openSUSE 13.2 is. That means writing a public announcement, a features guide, a press kit, social messages… What do all those initiatives have in common? They are all based on the major features page at the openSUSE wiki. So please visit the wiki and add your favorite 13.2 feature to that page. What have you being working on since 13.1? What feature blew your mind when you saw it in action? Why were you waiting for that particular version of your favorite tool? If it’s not in the major features page, it didn’t happen.

Taking pictures

A picture is worth a thousand words. Release Candidate 1 already includes the final artwork for openSUSE 13.2, so it’s time to renew the screenshots in the corresponding openSUSE wiki page and to add new ones. You don’t even need to take the screenshots yourself, openQA is full of pictures you can grab. Say cheese!

Highlighting the strengths

The already mentioned announcement and features guide are both great to have a clear overview of what is coming with the new release. But those teams that have hit a major milestone in openSUSE 13.2 maybe want to ensure that the achievement is not lost in the stream of shiny new things. Before (and even after) every release we use to publish several sneak peaks focused on concrete highlights. Just think about a worthy topic you are familiar with (btrfs and snapper, desktop environments, xfs…) and the openSUSE Marketing Team will be glad to help you turning it into a nice article.

Documenting

Is always nice to have somebody to ask when you find a problem, but is even nicer if you have all the pitfalls and important changes documented in advance. That’s what our release notes are for. As explained by Karl in the Factory mailing list, the release notes are ready for getting your contributions.

Getting ready to spread the word

If a release hits the Internet and no one tweets about it, does it make a sound? We don’t want to know the answer, so the openSUSE social machinery should be in perfect shape for the release date. If you manage some of the openSUSE related accounts in social media, please be sure to keep the corresponding wiki page updated so we can all coordinate.

Go for it

Enough said, there are tasks for everybody so let’s start working!

Both comments and pings are currently closed.

18 Responses to “openSUSE 13.2: time to get your hands dirty”

  1. mike

    It is bad enough opensuse is bloated with that systemd nonsense, but defaulting to BtrFS?

    Are you mad?

    BtrFS is nowhere near ready for any kind of production environment, be it your desktop or server. That you can change it is not a valid excuse. You want new adopters? Using unstable software, especially for something as critical as a FS will scare people back to Windows or OS X.

    It seems like every Linux distro is racing to the bottom, vying to be rendered worthless.

    With Systemd, Linux is becoming closer to worthless Windows and further away from what makes Linux so awesome.

    • David P.

      sooo…. do a custom setup and select your own partitioning scheme. We’re supposed to be smarter than Windows users, it’s not that difficult to select EXT4 from a drop-down menu, right?

      • mike

        It is easy enough to not use the worthless btrfs but opensuse is supposed to be newbie friendly and this sort of crap is the opposite of user friendly. A linux newbie is going to know to do anything but accept defaults.

        New users will report to their friends “don’t use linux, you will lose files” when it is not Linux’s fault, but is the fault of a very stupid decision.

    • Heng Lee

      Btrfs works without problems since openSUSE 13.1?

      So what do you want to tell us? That it’s unstable with other distributions?

      • steve

        If by “works without problems” you mean

        1. It is very slow
        2. Data corruption is common.

        Then yes, no problem.

    • Zach Mumford

      OpenSUSE ships with a default btrfs with experimental features disabled. It’ll be roughly on par with ext4 and xfs

  2. fvsdfg

    systemd.. yeah, can’t tell about Linux being Unix-like OS anymore.. Linux is becoming just “linux-like”..

  3. I pulled down all my .deb based distros because they were getting too easy to punch into… I’ve been with Suse and OpenSuse since 9.x and for the most part love it… Hopefully the device support will bring back some of the devices you have dropped or fix the ones that have become a PITA to use anymore (IE: one example is my HP DL585G5 – Sweet Nvidia Quadro 4600 teamed with a Tesla M2060 … Not so sweet every other week when an update causes me to have to log in as root in a console and re-run nvidia-xconfig to get my video working again… and that’s just one example … Dont get me started on what I think of having to manually code for the 2 clearspeed math cards in that same machine… The RPMs from the cd that came with em worked great till 13.1)…
    I love the rest of it though .. simple.. easy to use… and the ONLY distro I’ve been able to get the Tom Tom software to work with under wine (truly wish they’d just give us a Linux version – hate having to use wine AT ALL)

  4. Peter

    Question aboutthe installation of 13.2 RC1:
    I have a working 13.1 system (all updates applied) (dual booting with windows 7)with a 211 GB /home partition and a 20 GB / partition (both ext4)
    When trying to install 13.2 RC1 it ignores the existing /home and / partition and creates two small new partitions.

    On an other system (also 13.1, fully patched) with the / partition on a SSD drive (sdb1) and /srv, /home, /swap, /var and /tmp on seperate partitions (sda 1 to 5) it changes the SSD to sda and ignores it further. The /home partition is renamed to sdb2 and mounted as /home, /swap is renamed to sdb3 and mounted, other partitions are ignored. The existing /tmp partion iformatted as BtrFS and used as /. Instead of using the existing /srv partition a new subvolume /srv is made.

    Is this a bug or a consequence of the new default filesystems? For a new system I can understand the new defaults but should an upgrade not respect the existing filesystems or ask what to do with these partitions?
    Where can I find more information about this?

    Regards

    Peter

  5. Efjay

    I don’t know where to begin, I can’t even get the GNOME live iso to even start in VirtualBox!

  6. David P.

    Gnome icons could use a little more “flattening”.

  7. Steve

    Just tried build0019 and man is it ugly. That is the ugliest theme I have seen. It makes the turd colored Ubuntu look beautiful.

    None of the community repos work, it is slow.

    I think I will be skipping this version. Maybe someone with a clue will take over before it is too late.

    RIP Opensuse.

    • Michel

      What a stupid posting, like the two others above. It is just you who sucks man. If you’re not able to write substantial postings, just let it be! Thanks.

  8. Graham

    I have installed OpenSuse 13.2 RC1 on two systems: Intel desktop motherboard DZ77GA-70K and on a HP ProBook 6540b with Logitech cordless keyboard MX5500 and mouse. This install replace 12.3 on the laptop and 13.1 on the desktop.
    Delighted with YAST, especailly tex schemes. Looking forward to the release and wireless working, (I do like the way wireless can be switched on/off in gnome in fedore). I am very happy with this version, great work. I also add that I don’t think many people reliase what a huge amount of work must have been done by the programmers to get this system up. I a comparing it as best I can with Fedora and Ubuntu. I will be staying with OpenSuse and KDE.

  9. Graham

    I have installed, hassle free, OpenSuse 13.2 RC1 on two systems: Intel desktop motherboard DZ77GA-70K and on a HP ProBook 6540b with Logitech cordless keyboard MX5500 and mouse. This install replaced 12.3 on the laptop and 13.1 on the desktop. 13.1 would not install on the laptop. Please note that I do not use upgrade, instead, I write over the existing root directory with the new operating system.

    Delighted with YAST, especially with the tex schemes. I also have to add particular tex files.

    Looking forward to the release and wireless working, (I do like the way wireless can be switched on/off in gnome in fedora). I am very happy with this version, great work. I also add that I don’t think many people realise what a huge amount of work must have been done by the programmers to get this system up. I am comparing it as best I can with Fedora and Ubuntu. I will be staying with OpenSuse and KDE. It is the best Linux system that suit my needs.