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openSUSE Board election 2019-2020 – Call for Nominations, Applications

December 5th, 2019 by

Election time is here!

Two seats are open for election on the openSUSE Board. Gertjan Lettink completed his second term. Simon Lees completed his first term and thus he is eligible to run as a Board candidate again should he wish to do so.

The election schedule is as follows:

== Phase 0 ==

5 December 2019

* Announcement of the openSUSE Board election 2019-2020

* Call for Nominations and Applications for Board candidacy

* Membership drive. Become an openSUSE Member. Take the opportunity to apply for an openSUSE Membership during this phase (in order to vote or to run as a candidate).

25 December 2019

* Nominations and Applications for Board candidacy close

(more…)

Voters Choose Two New Board Members and One Incumbent to openSUSE Board

February 16th, 2019 by

Christian Boltz aka cboltz, incumbent

The results are in and the Voting Members have chosen incumbent Christian Boltz aka cboltz, new Board Member Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha, and new Board Member Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB to fill the three vacant seats on the openSUSE Board for the next two years.

New Board Member Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha

Out of 446 eligible voters, 46 more openSUSE Members than last elections, only 231 — 6 fewer than last elections — chose to cast their votes, leaving last spring’s elections holding the record both for most ballots cast and largest percentage of Members who took enough interest in openSUSE to take the time to cast their votes.

Incumbent Christian Boltz aka cboltz garnered the most votes with a total of 141 votes — more than half of those who voted — confirming the Community’s confidence in him.  He was followed closely by Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha with 119 votes — also more than half of the active voters — and Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB with 104 votes, almost half.

As incumbent, Christian is already sitting on the Board and will continue his duties for his second two-year term.  Marina and Axel are expected to join him and take their seats for their first two-year terms sometime within the next couple of weeks.

New Board Member Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB

The runners-up in this tough-to-decide race included three other impressive Candidates:  Incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace with 98 votes, Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv with 78 votes, Nathan Wolf aka futureboy and CubicleNate with 54 votes, and Sébastien Poher aka sogal with 51 votes.  Unfortunately, only three seats were vacant, as these three people would also have been valuable additions to the Board.

Next Elections Expected Less Than a Year in Fall of 2019

The Elections Committee for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections — Ish Sookun, Edwin Zakaria, and Gerry Makaro — sincerely hope that the runners up will step up to run again in the next elections as two seats will be up for election, one for Simon Lees, who will be finishing his first two-year term, and the other to replace Gertjan Lettink, who will be ending his second two-year term on the Board.

Board Members can only hold two consecutive two-year terms under openSUSE rules.

The Elections Committee would like to thank all the Community Members who stepped up to the plate and performed their Membership Duties in order to support openSUSE, the Project, and the Community in this elections process.  You can find out more about the Elections and the Candidates at the Official Wiki Page.

 

Only a Few Days Left to Cast Your Ballot in the Board Elections

February 10th, 2019 by

Cast Your Votes While You Can!

Ballots Will Close This Friday for 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections

Ahmad Romadhon, left, with openSUSE Board Member Simon Lees at the openSUSE Asia Summit

With only a few days left to go in the Board Elections, openSUSE enthusiast Ahmad Romadhon would like to urge all openSUSE Members who have not yet voted to cast their ballots before voting closes Friday, February 15, 2019 at 12h00 UTC.

The Gajah Mada University Indonesian Literature student from Yogyakarta, Indonesia, has contributed a new Poster for the openSUSE Elections with this goal in mind, as a healthy Community depends entirely on the active participation of its Members.

The ballots were sent out last week for the voting process to choose three Board Members in the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections from a total of seven top quality Candidates in the running.

Check Your Inbox

If you are an openSUSE Member, you should have received an email containing the elections url and your credentials to log in and cast your vote. If you did not receive this e-mail, and if you are a qualified Member, you must contact the Elections Committee immediately.

You may cast your vote until Friday, February 15, 2019. You may also update your vote within this time-frame should you wish to do so.  Qualified Community Members may vote for up to three out of the seven candidates whose biographies were published during the course of the Elections Campaign.

Not an Easy Choice, but it is Important to Choose Your Representatives

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Ahmad Romadhon

In this year’s Election, the voters are being asked to choose between a superb crop of seven quality Candidates with extensive credentials of Contributions to the openSUSE Project, and they can only select three of the seven, so it will be a difficult choice to make.

The Elections Committee would like to remind all openSUSE Contributors that a healthy Project is only possible if it has a robust roster of Members who participate in the Elections process, and it is especially important they cast their votes.  Only then can the Board be a true representation of what the Community and the Project want to help guide the current and future path of the organization.

Last spring, the elections included an impressive list of quality candidates in an election that was the longest election period in the history of the project elections, with 237 out of 400 Members voting: A record participation in percentage and actual numbers.

This year, the Elections Committee wants to exceed that record, but only you — as an openSUSE Member — can make that happen.

You can find out more about the Elections and the Candidates at the Official Wiki Page.

 

Voting Gets Underway for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections

February 5th, 2019 by

Cast Your Votes!

We have done our part:  Now, You do Yours!

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

The ballots are out and the 2-week voting process to choose three Board Members in the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections now gets underway, with a total of seven top quality Candidates running.

If you are an openSUSE Member, you should have received an email with the elections url and your credential to log in and cast your vote. If you did not receive this e-mail, and if you are a qualified Member, you must contact the Elections Committee immediately.  You may cast your vote starting now and until February 15, 2019. You may also update your vote within this time-frame should you wish to do so. The election ballots will close February 15, 2019 at 12h00 UTC.

Members may vote for up to three out of the seven candidates whose biographies were published during the course of the previous weeks.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Marina Latini

January 26th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 8 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Marina Latini

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

Hello, I’m Marina, and I was born in Italy, in a sunny July about 35 years ago. When I was a kid, I was always curious to discover how things are made, and my sister was always the victim of my curiosity. I broke a countless number of toys due to my need to know! Apart from some justified issues with her, this passion guided me to study computer science, and, in the same period, I finally discovered the FLOSS world.

Marina Latini aka deneb_alpha

Everything started around 2006 when a group of colleagues introduced me to Slackware, which shares a common history with what is nowadays openSUSE. That distro and that group of friends were the best way to learn a lot about GNU/Linux, how to properly recompile a kernel and the importance of knowledge sharing.

In the same group of friends, I also found a special one who shared with me twelve years of his life. After Slackware, the group was involved with Fedora, and we started to contribute actively as Fedora Ambassadors, organizing events in schools, university, and fairs.

In the same period, around 2007, I started to contribute to OpenOffice.org, mainly on localization and quality assurance.

My first encounter with openSUSE was in 2009, where I had the honour to organize the Software Freedom Day 2009 in Perugia together with our group, thanks to the introduction by Andrea Florio and Mariano Iumiento.

For the next four years, while I was promoting openSUSE and Fedora in parallel at various events and conferences, I was always using openSUSE as my main distribution, so I then decided to focus my main activities on that, ending my Fedora Ambassador role in November 2013.

I was one of the first Italian members of the LibreOffice community. I co-founded Associazione LibreItalia, and from 2016 on I am serving as The Document Foundation’s chairperson, being involved in several events, migrations, and trainings related to LibreOffice.

I worked at Studio Storti, an Italian company that provides open source solutions for Public Administrations, leading the LibreOffice Division.

In June 2018, I relocated to Munich, working at CIB mainly in its LibreOffice team as Senior Migrations & Deployments Engineer.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

I’m a proud openSUSE user and Advocate, and I finally decided to try to give something back to the Community and the Project that gave me so much until now.

The openSUSE Board guides the Project and takes care of the needs of its Community. It’s that body that can make the difference. It’s the next step between a group of passionate geeks who are doing funny stuff together, and a professional group of people with a clear vision and mission that can grow a real healthy and international open source project.

I strongly believe that, for having a really healthy Community, we need to start to search where are our users. Social channels are used also by new users who can become new Contributors. As I like to say with friends from other communities, we can have the best software or operating system in the world, but users need to find proper Documentation and get in touch with the local communities.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

One more crucial topic for growing the number of Contributors is closing the gap and improving the Communication between the main Project and the local community. We respect each other, we invest our spare time as volunteers, and need to connect what is considered a local group of Contributors or users, and the others who are part of the international community.

There isn’t a unique recipe for promoting openSUSE that works in each country. Only by listening to the local communities can we improve and grow.

What I would also love to do is to interact much more with other projects that are probably encountering the very same questions. The knowledge sharing is one of the key elements of the open source movement, and we should start to listen to other voices that could come also from outside the openSUSE Project, listening to what is going on around us.

The mix and share of needs and ideas can foster openSUSE much more.

Last, but not least, we need to invest more time in the educational sector.

While interacting with the local communities, we could have the opportunity to organize more activities, for example, with universities, high schools or secondary schools for creating a large user base of Contributors.

I will be glad and honoured to serve the Community as Board Member, sharing what I learned and I’m learning while supporting other communities like Fedora or LibreOffice

Have a lot of fun!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

For the past eight years, already, I have been involved in the LibreOffice community, as well as the local Italian community called LibreItalia, and for the past three years also The Document Foundation’s Board. I had the opportunity to see these groups grow, develop over time, become mature, and seeing easier and harder times, during which we’ve grown closer together.

I want to bring in this experience into the openSUSE Community, help us to grow, work together jointly and at the same time keep the true Community spirit alive.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I am proud and honoured to run for election and serve the Project that has given me so much for many years, already. If the openSUSE Members vote for me, I will bring in all my experience and do all my best to support the Community. With my background from LibreOffice and The Document Foundation, I know the duties and responsibilities of such a role, and I am willing to give my best to keep openSUSE an open, inclusive, welcoming, amazing and – most important – fun Community.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

Life is too short to have only one passion ,and there’s so much more than just a computer, so, besides my activities in free and open source software, I’m a mad goalkeeper and I love using my telescope to look up to the stars (which is where my nickname originates from).

I’m also a music addict: When I’m not listening to the amazing, soul comforting Van Morrison, I play the accordion myself, a hobby which I started at the age of 8.

Contact information

I’m always happy to talk – write me at deneb_alpha AT opensuse.org, ping me on Telegram at @deneb_alpha or contact me on Freenode at deneb_alpha

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Nathan Wolf

January 26th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 9 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Nathan Wolf

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

I started with Linux in 2003 back when you could go into the local software store and buy a boxed set of SUSE, Redhat or Mandrake. So, I started on Mandrake, later Mandriva.

Nathan Wolf aka futureboy and CubicleNate

About 2005, I gave openSUSE my first spin due to better hardware support with dial up modems and sharing the blazing 56 kbaud speed with the other computers on the network. I shifted to openSUSE full time in 2011 after some distro hopping because the structure and layout just made sense as compared to the other available offerings.

I began contributing to openSUSE in 2013 when I had a need to document the process to set up using the smart card system for openSUSE Linux. I compiled the works from several sources to make a repeatable process to properly set up the smart card.

Not long after, I had to start understanding how to install Oracle Java. I updated those instructions on the Wiki and it kind of snowballed from there. I discovered at that point I really enjoy documenting processes of getting things working. Rather than just keep my instructions for myself only, I used the fantastic openSUSE Wiki to share my knowledge.

My day job is working for Whirlpool Corporation in the Advanced Design and Innovation department. I primarily work with CAD. I have worked on proof of concepts in using Virtual Reality systems for design validation and am moderately experienced in using 3D Printers.

As far as hobbies go, beyond playing with anything Linux, I enjoy retro tech; especially the Commodore 64 … well, pretty much anything Commodore, but the 64 was my first computer. I also enjoy baking, and thanks to openSUSE and its many tools, it has made my kitchen life much more efficient.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

In my incredibly biased opinion, I think openSUSE is the best distribution of Linux, but not just for Leap and Tumbleweed, for everything else that goes along with it: The Open Build Service, openQA, Kiwi and YaST. There is an incredible story to be told about what makes openSUSE great.

Whether I am on the openSUSE Board or not, I make it a point to tell this story and share it with whomever is interested. I would like to continue the tell and further refine that story.

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

As an official Member of the Board, it will be my mission to be an Ambassador of the Project to as many Communities of which I am able and share what makes openSUSE great. For reasons that don’t make sense, openSUSE is often not in the broader conversation and it needs to be there. All the fantastic innovations and refinements to Linux and the related open source software need to be told.

My second mission is to do my best to network within the Community to the best of my ability to continue to improve and refine the openSUSE documentation through the Wiki to make openSUSE even more accessible for anyone interested.

It is my ambition to assist in understanding how to work with openSUSE as clear as possible. I want to make the learning process of the openSUSE Project as enjoyable as possible. openSUSE should have the best, clearest, easiest to understand and approachable Wiki out there.

My third mission is a selfish one. It is to make openSUSE the go-to distribution for all things in the engineering and manufacturing industry. Linux has been creeping into the industry more and more, and it only makes sense that openSUSE should be the distribution of choice for the home hobbiest, small and large businesses alike.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Not only are Leap and Tumbleweed technically very sound distributions, but the additional components — OBS, openQA and the Wiki — make it the ideal ecosystem to deploy a targeted spin of the distribution or series of meta packages to bolt onto Leap or Tumbleweed to serve the industry.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I will be open and accessible to openSUSE Members and the Community. I will remain positive and highlight all the good in the Project and the people within it. I will make a concerted effort to improve training and empower users to learn, grow, and own their hardware through openSUSE and it’s tools.

As a Board Member, I will do my best to network with the right individuals to bring about further improvements to the project. I will make it a point to uplift and edify the many Contributors and make sure they know how grateful I am, along with the Community for their time and talents. I want to ensure that openSUSE is the open, welcoming, and grateful community of which to be a part.

Whether I am elected to the Board or not, this entire process is a win for me. I am thrusting myself in front of the openSUSE Community, and in this process, I hope to get to know as many of the wonderful Contributors as possible. My hope is that I become more known, so that I may better Contribute to Documentation and make working with openSUSE even more enjoyable and individually empowering for all.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I have not made it a secret that I am a fan of old tech and especially Commodore.  As a teenager, I made a game for the Amiga in the 1990s called Gator Mania. It is a 2D platform side scrolling game.

I spent well more than a year programming in AMOS Professional where I had to create my own method of displaying the screen tiles with the limited graphics memory, file format for the game levels, level builder, did the pixel art (with the help of an artist friend) and animation and for the time, created the best (in my opinion) character physics I had experienced at the time.

I wanted to do more with the game, but the Amiga fizzled out on me and I sort of moved away from the platform.

Contact information

Email me AT CubicleNate
Email futureboy AT opensuse.org
IRC CubicleNate on Freenode or irc.geekshed.net
Telegram https://t.me/CubicleNate
Webpage CubicleNate.com
Twitter CubicleNate on Twitter

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Vinzenz Vietzke

January 25th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 10 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Vinzenz Vietzke

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

My name is Vinzenz Vietzke, but sticking with the much shorter “vinz” or “vinzv” is what I prefer. I’m 34 years old, live in a small town in southern Germany.

Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv

Like most German Linux users around my age, I made my first steps with S.u.S.E. back in the late 1990s. Over the years, I moved across various distributions and contributed to quite a few of them in different ways. My day job is product management and marketing at Linux hardware vendor TUXEDO Computers.

Starting with just one laptop running openSUSE, we at TUXEDO now offer around 20 different models plus a wide range of desktop PCs with Leap 15 pre-installed. Customers also get free lifetime support for their preinstalled system. Therefore, of course, our free phone/email tech support team need to be trained for openSUSE as well.

For this whole project, I was, and still am, in charge as the tech and project lead to “bring” openSUSE onto TUXEDO’s computers. I got in touch with oS, worked out how and when we get everything done.

In addition to technical affairs, I’m the pushing person at TUXEDO Computers to make our company step up with supporting openSUSE. As a result, since October 2018, we are officially sponsoring the openSUSE project.

We offer any of our models as demo and workshop devices at no cost and take care for the logistics and event booth support. Furthermore we’re sponsoring oSC19 in Nuremberg with demo and install fest machines.

Of course, these things are mainly financial efforts and company internal projects. Yet, to get openSUSE a wider reception, there needs to be someone coordinating, pushing, and taking care. That’s why I call my contributions to openSUSE mostly “meta contributions”.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

Working together with both the Board and openSUSE devs during the last year really was a blast. There were huge efforts, ideas, and helping hands everywhere. And, as I’m no developer myself, serving at the Board would be a way to give something back.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

Furthermore, I believe it’s important for the Community to have various candidates to pick from. And as I have the time I kinda feel obliged to at least offer my help.

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

From my perspective, the Board has two main roles: First and foremost, it is some kind of service provider. It serves the whole project as contact point for questions, projects coordination, and pointing in directions, etc.

This is crucial for the whole openSUSE Project and should never be changed, but merely extended if possible.

The second role might be named as “ideas sparking pot”. Most ideas coming from the Community are of a technical nature, which is entirely logical. Just, sometimes, there are things that the whole Project would benefit from, but no one sees them or has time to do so.

This is where the Board could jump in throwing sparks and giving input from someone being able to take a step back for viewing the bigger picture.

My role in this Board Team would both being approachable and helpful, for part one. But, also to give thoughts and ideas when needed, especially in the second part mentioned.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

I’ve been into Linux and open source communities for about 10 years now. Though I’m not a long term Contributor for openSUSE, I know how “things work” in such a big, diverse project, and how to handle this stuff.

If you want to get someone with no “Geeko glasses” on you should vote for me. Not that being deeply inside openSUSE’s Community is a bad thing! But I can bring in new perspectives, most of them related to end-users, Windows-ditchers, and the curious, but not tech-savvy, people. I both understand developers and tech people on the one hand, as well as people who are buying Linux preinstalled hardware with little will to tinker around.

This way I act as some proxy between those worlds which in the end might be good for everyone involved.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I am a professionally trained pre-school teacher, which one might find useful for mailing list threads.

Contact information

Email: vinz AT vinzv.de
XMPP: vinz@vinzv.de
IRC: vinzv@freenode

2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet Sébastien Poher

January 24th, 2019 by

Seven Candidates in Race for Three Vacant Board Seats

With only 11 days left to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

You can find out more about the Elections at the Official Wiki Page.

Meet Sébastien Poher

Intro/Biography

The Candidates were asked to give some biographical personal information, such as birthdate, age, their work, their openSUSE contributions, their hobby, and more, as they saw fit.

My name is Sébastien Poher, aka sogal or sogal_geeko. I am 35 years old now and live in France, between Lyon and Grenoble, where I work.

I am a GNU/Linux system administrator, but this is a second professional life. Before that I got graduated in logistics and transport and I worked as logistician in the civilian world and, during several years, in the French army. Right after that, I wanted to do something different and went back to school for 2 years in order to study system and networking administration.

Sébastien Poher aka sogal

During the last 3 years, I worked for the IT service in an archaeological company where we have been using openSUSE for years on our workstations and some servers. I recently quit and join Probesys, a small cooperative company.

My first contributions were done amongst a Debian user community, called Debian-Facile (french for “Debian made easy”), as well as translator for FSF news and bulletin inside the April GNU-Trad team.

I start using openSUSE (Leap) in late 2016 after switching from Debian that I used for some times but felt it did not fit my needs anymore. I was looking for a more balance and adaptable operating system. This is when I really and definitely fell in love with openSUSE. I start contributing in early 2017, thanks to the OBS, by packaging small utility software and I now maintain a dozen of packages.

I am also involved in the French openSUSE community. I started to write articles about openSUSE in the Alionet (the name of a French openSUSE users association) forum, I translate project news and relay them in several social medias. In the “writing” part of my activities I have contributed to the French openSUSE wiki. Last year I got elected as Alionet’s president and I am happy with it, there is quite a lot of work to do but we are a small group of motivated people and things are moving fine.

In 2018, I also held openSUSE booths during 4 important FLOSS events and sometimes make openSUSE Project presentations. Such events are a good opportunity to meet old and new users, but also volunteers of other communities such as Debian, Fedora, Mageia, LibreOffice, April and to have some cross-community chats.

I am also an apprentice drums player, I love stoner rock and metal music, craft beer, strangely flavored teas, mountain walks and vegan food.

Why you are running for the openSUSE Board?

To be honest, I had no plan of doing so in the first place. You may know that feeling “No… I can’t do it, I am not a highly skilled developer, just a small contributor, blablabla”. Then I saw the announcement, stating that there was not candidate yet. And I thought “What if there is really not candidates in the end? Will the project will suffer from it or no? As a project member, shouldn’t I try to help more?”.

2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi
2018-2019 Election Poster contributed by Aris Winardi

I do not have children, I have spare time, I like this project and think it is sane and fun. So why not keep on contributing in a different way? My inner self could not find any objection to it, so I applied!

What impact would you like to make as a member of the openSUSE Board?

If I get elected, what I would like to work on first is a periodic, user-friendly, newspaper. Not on how openSUSE is done: We already benefit from high quality, very technical, news about the development of openSUSE, Tumbleweed and YaST. But I think there is a room for news that answer the question: “What could a user do with openSUSE in everyday life? And what benefit could openSUSE brings to users who consider switching from another operating system?”

As a Project, openSUSE is not only Leap and Tumbleweed, there are other sub-projects in it that deserve to be under the spotlight sometimes.

There are good examples out there that can be inspiring :

  • The Fedora Magazine
  • The monthly FSF Supporter (translated each month by volunteers)

I will also be happy to get in contact with local users groups and see how they can be involved in a process of translation and relay of this news. And, the other way round, I would like to have the project communicate more about what local communities are doing.

Beside that, I do not fool myself: being a Board Member does not only mean having great ideas and being the super-hero that makes them real. A considerable part of the job is about less fun, administrative tasks such as writing tons of e-mails, organizing meetings, writing minutes and so on. That is sometimes an ungrateful job, but it needs to be done so that each and everyone in the project can focus on its own tasks.

Why should openSUSE members vote for you?

Well, because my sincere interest in openSUSE and my ability to deal with issues in a peaceful but steady and persistent way make me a good candidate. Through the diversity of previous experiences I had in professional and associative life, I have learned how to deal successfully with this kind of tasks.

The openSUSE Project is wide and diversified and I believe the Board should represent this diversity.

My various contributions show that I can be a good bridge toward the non-technical users sphere and that I have a clear view of what could be done to increase the openSUSE popularity amongst them.

What’s one thing people would find interesting about you that is not well known?

I was at the top of Mont Blanc at 8:00 AM on the 13th of August 2011 :) (and yes, I went there on foot).

Contact information

Email: sogal AT opensuse.org (to be preferred if you expect a quick answer)
on IRC under the nick ‘sogal’
Dispora : https://framasphere.org/people/d6a934c00f7b013456072a0000053625
Mastodon : https://fosstodon.org/@sogal
Twitter : https://twitter.com/sogal_geek

Questions and Answers With Candidates for openSUSE Board Elections

April 3rd, 2018 by

Elections for the openSUSE Board have been postponed until mid-April. Until then, the community can familiarize themselves with the candidates who are running for three available seats on the board.

openSUSE Community Members can engage with the candidates directly or on the openSUSE-project mailing list if they have specific questions for a candidate(s).

Candidates running for the openSUSE Board were each presented with the following questions:

 

  • What do you think is the best thing about the Project at the moment?
  • What do you think is the worst thing in the Project?
  • If you are elected as a Board member how are you going to address it?
  • What is one thing community members are unlikely to know about you?
  • How do you feel about openSUSE collaborating with other FOSS projects and
    what would be your first act toward there if you get elected?

 

Their full responses to the questions are listed below under their name, which is linked to their blog: (more…)